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  1. Hello I just finished writing the code for this Watermills of Sheffield page, it's an interactive map showing all the locations of the watermills listed in the book 'The Water-Mills of Sheffield' by W.T. Miller published in 1947. Tap on a mill for its name, and tap on the name for the description from the book. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/history/watermills/ I've written it for use on a mobile phone, for when you are out and about, and on this the GPS can be used to show your location. It will also work with a desktop PC. Thanks Karl.
    4 points
  2. A cement train jumped the points at Midland Station at the North end on the 11 November. Seventeen Wagons came off the rails and one turned over ripping the wheels out of the mounting! Somebody filmed it the same day
    2 points
  3. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9F_9ck-uOgc https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9F_9ck-uOgc
    2 points
  4. Never heard of one in Sheffield,most well known one is in london.
    1 point
  5. UK Grid Reference Finder https://gridreferencefinder.com/ "High Bradfield SK273 937" https://gridreferencefinder.com?gr=SK2730093700|SK273_s_937|1&t=SK273 937&v=r
    1 point
  6. Certainly. The top and bottom lines read Mystery Datestone #___ & <<sheffieldhistory.co.uk>> in a font which uses rotated and reflected numbers and various manipulated symbols to represent roman lettering. The central line also reads Mystery Datestone (or misŭtori deit'sŭtōn) in katakana, one of the Japanese lettering formats.
    1 point
  7. Since 1973 Sheffield has had its own local steam society / club which is concerned not with rail but more with road steam and traction engines. The "Sheffield and District Steam Society" was formed in 1973 and has put on a steam rally almost every year since (floods prevented an event in 2007!) In recent years the name has changed to "Sheffield Steam and Vintage Club" to emphasise its interest in other aspects of local transport and not just steam. The early rallies were held at Oakes Park until a dispute with the council over Sunday trading forced them out of the City to Walesw
    1 point
  8. https://www.derelictplaces.co.uk/main/industrial-sites/35780-whirlow-mill-sheffield-january-2018-a.html?s=d05c1aa546c874aeb1cfa35f141e1d93
    1 point
  9. Went for a lockdown walk yesterday to a couple of the locations shown on your water wheel app. We walked up through Ecclesall Woods past Rycroft Mill, not a lot to see there! carried on up to Whirlow Bridge, had a look around the excelent Whinfell Quarry Gardens, before taking the footpath past the Whirlow Wheel and Mill Pond. The path follows the Limb Brook (originally called "Fenny Brook") up the valley to where the Brook rises at Ringinglow Came across a bit of info about the Wheel on this derelict places website. https://www.derelictplaces.co.uk/main/industrial-sites/35780-w
    1 point
  10. This area has changed a lot since this photograph looking out over Abbeydale Golf Course was taken in 1928! You can make out Hemper Lane heading towards the village of Greenhill, it also shows that the field layout hadn`t changed much since W&J Fairbanks drew the plan of the area in 1804. The property circled on Hemper Lane is numbered 34 on the Fairbanks plan. Over to the bottom left is Beauchief Hall and stables, recently developed into luxury properties. The Lane heading uphill towards Hemper Lane, once a private drive serving the Hall, is part of an ancient byway that went on
    1 point
  11. Could the knife handle be made of "Xylonite". This was a cheap replacement for ivory and normally had no striations or markings in it. It was a form of celluloid and highly inflammable but was easy to mould into small objects like handles. It's been around since Victorian times 'so not much use in dating the knife. My mother's family mostly worked for Walker and Hall and "xylo" fires were commonplace. It was basically the same material as the old cinema film base and that burnt down many a cinema projection room. If left near a lit cooker hob or open fire it readily caught fire with an alarmin
    1 point
  12. I'm sorry, but you can't really use Bagley Dike as a main Sheffield river to then create 2 hills out Wincobank and the Roman Ridge. Otherwise you would have to start using other lesser tributaries Like Limb Brook and Abbey Brook to carve up the hills. Take the 6 rivers and there are 7 "uplands" in-between them which contain many different hill names. Mapping from OS Open Data copyright 2020.
    1 point
  13. The book by T Walter Hall is now available online or for download. This is useful to be able to zoom in on, as the paper copy maps are small reproductions. Fairbanks of Sheffield - T Walter Hall
    1 point
  14. Technically, probably not a very good try! Well, I've passed under that hundreds of times and never seen it so can understand why its not so obvious - especially if you overestimate the crypticism. Can also now see why the thread has, perhaps, lost some of its Hype?!
    1 point
  15. Orchard Square! Have a watch of this wander through before Lockdown happened... Watch here
    1 point
  16. OK not strictly buses/trams, here are a couple of photos from a large transport archive showing inspection of a taxi at East Bank Garage following a collision in 1965. They are Sheffield Transport originals so a record of the incident. Also text from rear. Hope they may be of interest.
    1 point
  17. Have done a selective overlay of the 1930's map onto a 1920's base to illustrate the features evident in the second photo, plus the apparent sightlines. That's a brilliant spot. The camera really foreshortens the distance to the buildings. Used to run up there fairly regularly and never knew why that stretch of Abbey Lane had the odd road layout.
    1 point
  18. The former 'The Wybourn' pub, Cricket Inn Road, 1848. Although whether that is the date of opening/construction the pub experts will be able to tell us...
    1 point
  19. The Old Heavygate Inn, Crookes, 1696.
    1 point
  20. I think the second picture is Abbey Lane, not too far from where the reserved track starts at the Beauchief end. The houses in the background to the right are the first pair of semi-detached houses on Folds Lane (still there but modified, with newer houses added between them & Abbey Lane) and the house to the left of the tram is The Folds, now replaced by the housing on Beauchief Rise. Clearly the photo was taken before houses were built along this stretch of Abbey Lane. The only image I can find which supports my thinking is this aerial shot from Picture Sheffield which is looking th
    1 point
  21. Unfortunately not! There was no such thing as legitimate betting or gaming in pubs or beerhouses at that time and it was quite common for licensees to be pulled up in court for allowing it to occur. That said, this was clearly seen to be a very severe case and the sum fined was very high (I think it is probably the maximum they could have fined in the circumstances). There were consequences beyond the fine too. Your Great Grandfather would almost certainly have had a "letter from the brewery" (Worksop & Retford) following the conviction giving him notice as there would be no chance th
    1 point
  22. ...and he looks as if butter wouldn't melt in his mouth: Here's an aerial photo taken in 1951 - Acorn arrowed (Britainfromabove.org.uk):
    1 point
  23. Hi, I'm new to the forum Joseph Morton was my paternal great grandfather and finding this post cleared up a family tree mystery. I knew he lived at 20 Burton Road and that he ran a pub called the Acorn but always assumed it was the other Acorn (288-292 Shalesmoor). My great aunt told me that they lived in the pub though so I couldn't work out what was going on. Now I know - there was another Acorn on Burton Road and it was a beerhouse not a pub. I wonder if there are any old photos of it? I noticed on Google Maps that it's now a nice looking coffee shop. I've added a phot
    1 point
  24. The station was opened, without ceremony, on 1 February 1870 and the first down train to arrive was the 06.15 from St.Pancras. The local press commented; " We have witnessed more fuss over the opening of a drinking fountain". Contemporary descriptions describe "rock faced wall stones...tool dressed and in the style of architecture...Grecian with Gothic headings>An iron and glass roof above the four 700ft x 30ft platforms was supported on 42 columns and a 105ft footbridge was provided. Two open docks were built at the north and a single covered dock at the southern end. Three signal boxes we
    1 point
  25. The Nunnery (1868 commencement), Manor and Manor Wood pits were owned by the Duke of Norfolk, as was the “occupation” or private road called Lovetot road, or Bacon lane. The Duke’s office possibly had a plan to run a spur off the existing coal tramway, along Lovetot road and over the canal to serve the Baltic, Fitzalan and Effingham steel works, and the Attercliffe Steam Corn Mill (though that burned down in 1863). The stillborn plan was probably nailed in its coffin when in 1878 the Midland Railway gained permission for changes to improve their network – this included: “stop up so m
    1 point
  26. This question arose from consideration of another recently bumped topic, in which the former terrace on Lovetot Road, behind the Woodbourne Hotel, came up. Why is it that there are two substantially detatched, but aligned, parts of Lovetot Road? I don't think there is any indication that the road can have existed prior to the canal, in which case the two parts can never have been connected. However, was there ever an intention to connect them? It seems from mapping of the 1890's that there was an extension of the road to the canal edge on the northern side in that era and perhaps some provisio
    1 point
  27. A little eastward of the intersection of West Street & Rockingham Street, with the Rockingham Lane (correction: Bailey Lane - photo taken from RHS of West St) intersection not far behind the photograph. Number 79 West St - Smith & Snape (painters) evident behind the left hand side of the arch.
    1 point
  28. A very imposing looking archway here to signify the visit of King Edward and Queen Alexandra to Sheffield Tram tracks running along cobbled stones and looks like an industrial area Anyone know where we are looking at here exactly?
    1 point
  29. They visited Sheffield in 1905 to officially open the original University. They also visited a number of local steelworks and I believe the photo is taken on Brightside Land near Hawke St on the occasion of their visit to Vickers Sons and Maxim.
    1 point
  30. Sheffield Midland Railway Station - Dated circa 1900/1910?
    1 point
  31. This is how it looked prior to demolition of houses, Multiple Acting Flux was the low building the cemented bit of wall at the base of the gable end is still visible, the stone building is I presume the edge of the wall part brick next to the castle type building. https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s25339&pos=25&action=zoom&id=27783
    1 point
  32. The pub has now been demolished and the well building is visible from Langsett Road.
    1 point
  33. Another picture for this topic Pond Street Bus Station 1951. Rear of photo is included for interest
    1 point
  34. These images show Sheffield Transport images of a bus crash on Leopold Street - date unknown. I've included the notes on the back of each photo This may be 1965
    1 point
  35. All six uploaded to your site.
    1 point
  36. Think this is the one https://goo.gl/maps/jF9BdUH794QmssSj9
    1 point
  37. Excellent, "JonathanF", here it is for all who wish to search, Pinder Brothers of Sheffield used the trademark "Pinro". Kalfred
    1 point
  38. It was chucking it down!!. Mum and dad took me to see the parade and we stood on the Moor in front of British Home Stores, which as the doors were set back offered a bit of shelter. I remember the lights on the illuminated trams going past and being soaked. Apparently I told dad I wanted to be a tram driver, he told me not to be so daft, but then again I was only three years old. Fast forward thirty odd years and I joined the tramway museum at Crich, and eventually got to be a tram driver, and got to drive the Last Tram I had seen that night.
    1 point
  39. Closure started with withdrawal of the Express passenger services in 1960. The last bit was the service between Rugby and Nottingham and that finished in 1969. Only the Chiltern services out of London to Aylesbury remain. After several false starts work on the channel tunnel finally started in 1988, so well after the GC closed.
    1 point
  40. Joining in a bit late here - only just joined the group! As others have said, these are indeed GPO cable joint marker posts, dating from the Victorian, Edwardian and Georgian reigns. There are many remaining around the country, yet they are under-reported and (I think!) under-appreciated. Like many people, it was only on my "local" walks during lockdown that I first noticed these, and it took some detective work to rule out fire hydrant, benchmark and various other options. I've now set up a website dedicated to these relics, at gpo-markers.derektp.co.uk where I give some historical backgrou
    1 point
  41. I have some details, he was my Grandmothers nephew. I just wondered if there was anyone as I have a picture of an article in the Star about him attending Buckingham palace to receive the DSC from the king. I also have a photo and am not sure if it is him, I believe it is but cannot verify it as I cannot get the name from the number on the collar.
    1 point
  42. I'm not related but as this family came from my side of town I picked out a few points, which you may already have: A school record from SheffieldIndexers, giving his date of birth: Batty, Joseph (Student, dob 09 Dec 1917). Parent or guardian name(s): Joseph (~), of 163 Channing Rd. Admitted to Marlcliffe Rd Mixed Council School, Wadsley, as of 26 Aug 1929, until 23 Dec 1931, reason for leaving: Over age. Previously attended Walkley C. His birth was not registered until the next quarter. The index lists his mother's maiden as WILKINSON. His parents mar
    1 point
  43. The Linen dept at Fowlers was my next place of work after Atkinson's. Wanting a job nearer home, I was told Fowlers were looking for a linens junior. As it was the dept I was trained in, it was the perfect job. I was there early 1970s, the dept buyer was Mr Ford, he was small, a bit bossy, and had a little top lip moustache, which earned him the name of 'little Hitler'. The other senior sales was a lovely old chap Willis Haslam. He used to be a Traveller, but retired and came to work on the dept. He was full of fun and a real windup, used to play allsorts of tricks on the staff, It wasn't unus
    1 point
  44. Not really familiar with this miniature engine at all At appears to be in 3" scale (thats 3" to the foot, or if you prefer, quarter size) It also seems to have the look of a Burrell single cylinder agricultural engine of about 6nhp. The miniature is not full completed as its boiler lacks its lagging and cladding as well as its final coat of paint (typically green on this sort of engine). The engine is being prepared for steaming. That extension on the chimney which is forcing smoke out sideways from the top is a "blower". This is a small electric fan, often powered from a car bat
    1 point
  45. This engine is Fowler works number 15462 made by Fowlers of Leeds in 1919, registered for the road as AD 9162 and carrying the name "AJAX" (The ancient Greek hero, not the cleaning powder). It is a 7nhp (nominal horse power) A9 class road locomotive weighing around 12 tons. It is owned by Mr. Middlewood.
    1 point
  46. Dave I have a friend who I met through a local forums photography group, he's a very keen photographer and he did make a visit to the steam rally. These are a few of Paul's photos that he very kindly gave the permission to post up on here. all photos taken by Paul Buckley
    1 point
  47. quote name='Gramps' post='26445' date='Nov 1 2008, 03:39 PM']I bet he's chuntering about the old buses not having wheelchair access Many people of my age will remember steam waggons in use on the roads in the late 1940s - especially the brewers drays. Not sure which was the more exciting to a small boy - a horse-drawn dray or a steam dray. I once saw a photo of a steam tram, but it may not have been a Sheffield tram, being used as a snow-plough I think; and I remember my grandfather taking me to some works in Attercliffe where he did his apprenticeship to show me a steam-driven tilt ha
    1 point
  48. Acorn 20 Burton Road Open 1887 Closed 1912, Span became a Boys Club 1887 Francis Harrison 1898 Joseph Morton [ beerhouse ] 1903 Joseph Morton
    1 point
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