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  1. Because River Don is the major river of South Yorkshire and flows right across it from the extreme west to the extreme east I have always had an interest in its source. The location of the latter is somewhat complicated by the fact it is dammed very early in its course by the Winscar reservoir which is about 6 miles west of Penistone. However, careful inspection of a large scale map shows that the Don, as a stream, flows into the reservoir's western arm (see pic 1) and its source being just over a mile further west from there at SE 119 027 (see pics 13 & 14). By the time the Don flows into Winscar numerous streams have already converged into it including one from "Don Well" (see pic 6) which is situated at SE 133 027. Despite its name the well cannot really be thought of as the source because the Don is already a significant stream (see pic 5) before it reaches that area. Furthermore the quantity of water flowing into the Don from the well is relatively insignificant, or it was on the day I visited (see pic 8). Arguably, because it is all a little subjective, the Don rises from an area of marshy ground around Withens edge and at that point it appears to be named Great Grain(s). Interestingly the aforementioned area is the watershed for the Don and the River Etherow (see pics 13 to 16) , the latter flowing in the opposite direction and eventually ending up in the Irish sea via the rivers Goyt, Tame and Mersey. The Don's eventual destination is, of course, the North sea so, in this area, drops of rain landing just a few feet one way or the other determines which sea they flow into 140 miles apart. It is not just coincidence that Holme Moss radio transmitter is situated less than 2 miles from this watershed (see pic 13) because transmitters are, ideally, situated at altitude to maximise their coverage. Holme Moss is purely a radio TX these days but when it was built in 1951 it transmitted TV (on VHF) over both sides of the Pennines, just like the Don/Etherow watershed does for water ! Also see : https://drtomsbooks.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/the-yorkshire-river-don-b.pdf Pictures (in rough geographical order E to W) : 1 - River Don entering the west end of Winscar reservoir 2 - River Don flowing down towards Winscar reservoir 3 - Confluence of Little Grain Clough (?) and the Don 4 - The River Don just downstream of Don Well 5 - Last confluence of the Don (or Great Grain) before Don Well 6 - Don Well 7 - Water rising from the marsh at Don Well 8 - Water from Don Well seeping into the Don 9 - Just down from the Don watershed, looking west 10 - Early course of the Great Grain 11 - Typical rising of a watercourse 12 - Great Grain as a brook 13 - River Don watershed facing WNW towards Holme Moss transmitter 14 - River Don watershed facing east 15 - River Etherow watershed facing SW 16 - River Etherow watershed facing SW (note Holme Moss transmitter to the right).
    7 points
  2. I think the Swift Tool Set was introduced by Spear and Jackson in the early 1950s.
    2 points
  3. A few pics from my recent visit
    2 points
  4. Im sure there are many memories of the old Tinsley Yard. It's heyday was slightly before my time, although I do remember going to the last few open days growing up. The Sheffield District Railway is a fascinating story. Some of it still used. Some of it left waiting to maybe one day be reclaimed and some of it wiped out. Ironically, it's been in the news this week that the Meadowhall Rd bridge may be taken down.
    2 points
  5. Mabel Brooke ran the sweetshop / tobacconist shop. She was there in 1939 (with husband unemployed clerk Cecil) and still there in 1957 (Kellys Directory). But by 1969 it was in the hands of M. Staniland, a confectioner according to Kellys, so must have boarded over the Brookes' name. Cecil died in 1983 and Mabel in 1995.
    2 points
  6. Hi again duckweed. I have found a mention under Norfolk Park that simply says :- " between 1912 - 1954 Bowling greens and tennis Courts were added " I am waiting to hear back from a lady who lives at Norfolk Park, and is on the Res Assn, she is most informative, so will let you know if I get any more details, regards Heartshome.
    1 point
  7. Came across this on an auction site, may or may not be connected? www.easyliveauction.com/catalogue/lot/-lot-508/
    1 point
  8. My suggestion is William Swift, a little mester, who operated from 139 Crescent Road, Walkley (later named Walkley Crescent Road). He died 21st January 1886 and didn't advertise anywhere so far as I can see. He employed one of his sons, Elijah, as a blade forger plus one other man part time. Elijah died aged 32 in 1889.
    1 point
  9. Hursts are Woodland, which Scurfield doesn't grasp in his map. I think he tends to rely on the later map by Fairbank to place any woods. But by the time of Fairbank the trees had been ripped out of the park and the field system put in place. Stone Hurst especially was extensive and seems to have been lined with Holly Trees on the top on what is Hutter Hill, or what later became Elm Tree Hill. The Holly trees extended out of the park all the way down to the place still called Hollinsend today. A traveller even commented on them around 1700. Skelton's lodge became Park House farm right on the boundary. And she also had Buck Wood, called Berrystorth wood back then. The Conduit Plaine is now called Deep Pit and the conduit was Kirk Bridge Dike, which still runs through it. The plaines were open areas. And thanks to a quirk of fate we can get an idea what they looked like from Bradgate Park, which never had the landscape people working on this old park.
    1 point
  10. Good thinking HD. Here's the relevant page from Harrison's Survey of 1637, together with Scurfield's recreation of the lost Harrison map, and a later map of 1894, though the field shapes have changed. The Pond would have been in Pond Meadow (ref 14) though it is not shown on Scurfield's map. The buildings to the south east of the pond seem to be known variously as "Keeper's Lodge","Arbourthorne Lodge" and "Paddock Farm"
    1 point
  11. The introduction to "Mothering Sunday" on Wikipedia explains how it evolved: So having been converted from a European religious observation it became an American "Motherhood and apple pie" type event and then slipped back across the Atlantic. Then, as Athy noted, the card manufacturers noticed a gap in the market and Father's Day was invented. In the '60s Dad was rather disapproving of "Mother's Day" as against "Mothering Sunday" and treated Father's Day as both Athy and Heartshome mentioned. Mum on the other hand rather liked childish home made cards and hearts from my brother and myself!
    1 point
  12. Although now one of our UK yearly celebration days, it actually started in America at the beginning of the 1900s,. The first one originally being held to honour Fathers who had been killed in a mining accident, as well as those who survived. It was a day also actively pressed for by a lady who wanted Fathers, to have their day in thanks, as did the Mothers. It's interesting how these things come about!!
    1 point
  13. I do remember Fathers' Day cards being introduced, perhaps in the 1970s or 1980s. My parents would have nothing to do with it: "It's just a commercial thing, not a proper religious festival like Mothering Sunday" was Mum's, and therefore the family's, official line. We did observe Mothers' Day, indeed woe betide us if we didn't.
    1 point
  14. Hi Athy. I have found some more intriguing info. - Apparently, European Catholics have been celebrating Father's Day since the middle ages, originally on St Joseph's Day 19th March. An annual day of Fatherhood, can be traced back to 1508, but it may possibly have started even earlier. Though our modern Father's Day idea is known to have started in America in the early 1900s, it was in 1966 Lyndon B Johnson declared that the 3rd Sunday in June would be known as Father's Day,. Then in 1972, Richard Nixon had it written in to the law. The UK had already taken up the idea. Apparently it started to gain popularity here after the 2nd World War, with the American influence, and by the late1960s it was well established. I do remember my Mum celebrating Father's Day when we went to my Grandad's, giving him his favourite Park Drive ciggi's and a bag of his favourite sweets, they were like large Fisherman's Friends. didn't half niff!
    1 point
  15. This is nostalgic, i had forgotten many of the venues. I started my years as a glass collector at the Bucaneer, collecting hundreds of plastic "skiffs" to be washed and re-used. I progressed to be a bouncer there, hmmm funny as i was only 17, but being 6'3" my age was never checked. Also a bouncer at the Penthouse and earned extra money by doing the beer lift, there was no elevator at the Penthouse and had to hump 9 gallon kegs up many flights of stairs to the bar at the top. Bounced for many years at the Wapemtake and was there from when Bucaneer closed until end of 1977, when i moved to Australia. Typical Saturday in Sheffield when not working : Saturday lunch at Craisy Daisy, the when that closed, downstairs in side walk cafe for a cappuccino and MASSIVE scone. Then off to Penthouse for afternoon beer lift. Home, quick change, back into tow n start off at Stone House, then the Yorkshire man, then Lord Nelson, then the Wap for a few and some heavy music, quick trip to the Zing Vaa chinese then off to Joesphines for some soul. Then at some ungodly hour on Sunday morning getting the 73 circular bus to somewhere near home,
    1 point
  16. I've started a site covering the history of Norton Lees - I'd appreciate any information, photos, maps etc. to add. http://nickrobinson.info/nortonlees/
    1 point
  17. Here is a great site for going back in time. You can change the size of the spy glass, move it about, move the map about. https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/spy/index.cfm#zoom=17&lat=53.38263&lon=-1.46640&layers=168&b=1&r=41 g
    1 point
  18. I'd be seriously worried about the cars on the right under the lamp post with most of the concrete missing! And before we have a spate of council bashing, this was a private road, so they weren't council lamps. 😁
    1 point
  19. Another view
    1 point
  20. I lived on Norborough Rd back in the 60's and remember all that area long before the motorway was built and where the filming of the FOUR LIONS was made on Sheffield Rd, that street ran on for some way, across the road was a bank, further down were a number of shops and post office, then along came the building of the motorway, on Saturdays we'd go to help the workmen doing odd jobs from cleaning their mess cabins out to odd job carrying, for 5 shilling it was well worth it, some very happy days spent in and around the area, Tinsley was one of the best places I lived at during my youth. The canal was always known as the 'cut', as youths we swam in it during summer, there were old bomb shelters further down towards Rotherham behind the works, happy days.
    1 point
  21. The Leary sisters Left to right : Ethel Baker Leary , Ida May Leary , Doris Hilda Leary , Eva Maude Leary
    1 point
  22. Thanks for that SteveHB you must have a magic touch with Picture Sheffield. I wouldn't have fancied living in number 14, it would certainly follow number 16 (boarded up} into the river at some point. I'll bet the people who lived in that row didn't slam their front doors
    1 point
  23. Hi I have a mojo membership card which expired August 68, it was my mums and I was made behind mojo’s lol, wonder if this is anything you would be interested in
    1 point
  24. My observations are all from pictures of the station. I did sneak onto it one day in the 70's, via the loading dock area. My friend and I had to do it when the signal man at Number three box wasn't looking. We got on to platform two and three via the white steps that had been put in to let staff get onto the platform more easily. I suppose it was for the train crews of the goods trains that were still passing the station and change of crew. You can see them in the photo below with a nice shot of the hotel too. We only went on to see what it was like. It was remarkably still intact, we were too scared of going inside any of the buildings or down the steps of the subways. I didn't know there was a staff canteen. There are a number of buildings of odd design on the station in the photos I have seen. One is of a brick building, could this be your canteen? Then a green and white structure near the end of platform 4 and 5. What was that for I wonder? The last picture is a shot of holiday makers in 1962 crammed onto platform five! You can see the lights with the station name above them and a tannoy system.
    1 point
  25. In my job I travel (full time) the UK and visit villages, towns and cities. Go on any facebook group about ANY place (I have to do this as part of my job) and you'll get the older generation doing nothing but slating their local council, saying the council are responsible for the downturn of their town or city centre, that it used to be better in the old days etc etc Even amazing places - the places that you visit, love and admire - on their facebook groups - people whinging about their council. It's so tiresome That's just my opinion
    1 point
  26. It’s my opinion that our Council have somewhat limited powers over planning and are always aware that a rejected application can cost us a small fortune should it go to appeal. Similarly , they have little responsibility for development…depending largely on inward investment…..although ,recently, they acquired the Cole Bros building in a failed attempt to keep a John Lewis presence in our City centre and the old Court House saga is another example of the limitations Councils have. National Governments ,over the years ,have steadily eroded Council powers ….to the extent that “emasculated “fairly describes them. Gone are the days of Chamberlain in Birmingham and “Municipal Enterprise”…..and who knows what our Regional Mayors May achieve. Sheffield Council are not immune from criticism but ,in fairness, are under severe financial constraints ,yet they still do their best to manage a large City with its own problems …remaining from de- industrialisation over 40 years past.
    1 point
  27. Perhaps I am being a bit harsh on the council and they are investing heavily in the city centre with the Heart of the City project and they have announced plans for the regeneration of Fargate and purchased some of the buildings but I just feel that an opportunity has been missed to create an area for small independent traders to breathe some new life into Chapel Walk. I do not want to criticise the council and be seen as a 'whinger' and hopefully the current investment will help re-vitalise streets like Fargate and Chapel Walk.
    1 point
  28. Athy, If you're free the 11th and 12th June, why not come down to the Emergency Services Museum for the experience. The Guys and Girls would be happy to explain anything to you. They maybe classed as a bit 'off the wall', but they are very passionate about what they do, and love the history of Victorian technology. I think you would find it of interest and something quite different. I'm looking forward to it! Regards Heartshome.
    1 point
  29. It's because they are 'Unconventional' with their Fashion and Fictional Technology, and with Steam being their Power source, not electricity. I guess you could say it's because they 'go against the norm'. *( Just for a bit of extra info! The word STEAMPUNK is said to have been first used in a novel in 1987 by K.W.Jeter called MORLOCK NIGHT. He used it to describe genre of speculative fiction, where Steam not electricity drove technological advancements )*
    1 point
  30. Hi Athy. They're not the sort of punks you're thinking of with spikey green hair! Ha! Ha! Roughly! it's a Vintage style of Fashion and Design ideas, based largely on the Victorian era with a Modern Slant. Encapsulating Steam Power and Science Fiction, with a strong interest on the mechanics of Time Pieces. It makes for a very interesting event. Heartshome
    1 point
  31. Hello! As many of you may know, Leah's Yard on Cambridge Street was once a collection of industrial workshops that survived until the late 1900s. It is currently undergoing a £6m restoration and is set to open mid 2023 creating a unique heritage destination of local independent retailers, cafes and restaurants. We are very aware that Leah’s Yard has a long and rich history as a key part of Sheffield City Centre, and as part of the redevelopment we would like to uncover and share the stories that you all have. Whether you worked there yourself, know someone who did or visited Leah's as a customer, we would love to hear from you. If you have photographs from the time that you don't mind sharing that would be amazing too! These stories are essential to conserve the heritage and life at the heart of Leah's. We are also looking for more recent stories from when Leah's was used by independent businesses up until 2007. You can either message on here or email us for further information. Email: TAP@leahsyard.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leahsyard/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leahsyard/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/leahsyard
    1 point
  32. The hotel was built in 1862 and both the Manchester Sheffield and Lincolnshire and Great Northern Railways subscribed to it. It was always a stand alone structure and passengers from the station had to pass out via the ticket barriers to get to the Hotel. At one time it was very black with smoke and when they cleaned it up, they left a small patch to show how dirty it was once! I have been told that my grandmother Alice Appleyard worked as a cleaner there. The picture below shows it in 1969.
    1 point
  33. I look forward to seeing it, the original was brilliant and Robert Carlisle's Sheffield accent was spot on.
    1 point
  34. Thanks Page Hall-er. I will send them an email.
    1 point
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