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  1. Edmund

    Edmund

    Sheffield History Member


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  2. leksand

    leksand

    Sheffield History Member


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      94


  3. LeadFarmer

    LeadFarmer

    Sheffield History Member


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      237


  4. Lemmy117

    Lemmy117

    Sheffield History Member


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 17/12/20 in all areas

  1. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  2. The church with the question mark is St. Andrew's, on St. Andrew's Road, now demolished, used to go to Cubs there in the '60's. Nigel L
    2 points
  3. The European cup, once lost, wss subsequently handed in at West Bar Police Station http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8709846.stm It was the most prized piece of silverware in European club football - but one night in a pub in the West Midlands, it went missing. Twenty-eight years later the story of how two teams of police officers played to win the European Cup can finally be told. Very few people knew about the disappearance and subsequent recovery of this famous piece of football silverware in Sheffield. A secret kept for the last 28 years. In May, 1982, Aston Vi
    2 points
  4. Old Maps did reply! They asked for the postcode! I gave them plenty of details when I first sent the request. It doesn't take to much effort to find Sheffield and then select the 1967 large scale map to soon see the blank sections! And it's the case that's it's not loading in, because you can see the watermarking of "old maps" on the white sections.
    1 point
  5. The downstairs part of Sheaf House accessed by the yard round the back was occupied by WH Smith Wholesale. They supplied most of the newsagents in Sheffield with newspapers and mags from there in the 60s/70s and maybe later. They also had a showroom where you could buy toys and stationery etc The postal address was : Sheaf House , Sheaf Street
    1 point
  6. Up hill and round the front between Corporation St. and Steelhouse Lane.
    1 point
  7. Hi guys, I wondered if anyone on here might be able to help with something (or know someone who can). I’m producing a documentary about John Burkhill aka the green pram man. In his interview he mentions that his wife had being diagnosed with cancer in 1992 and her final wish was to do the marathon and win a finishers medal, as she had never won anything before. John contacted the race organisers and got permission. He said that when they walked into the stadium, it was almost as though they’d won it. Everyone was cheering them on and he said his wife was the happiest he’d ever seen h
    1 point
  8. The result of the above in comparison to: Obviously Google Earth as a few limitations with angles and clarity —plus differences from things like focal-length of cameras, etc, but I think it ends up pretty close so Hallam Tower is definitely a viable candidate and I'm pretty convinced the photo was taken from there.
    1 point
  9. Direct line from the old Hallam Tower to the photo position...
    1 point
  10. I only have a very vague recollection of those buildings being up. The building next door (on the left in pic) is now flats and a very good curry house underneath, Seven Spices balti.
    1 point
  11. No that's the front of the Lescar, the snooker place is behind it, and Cowlishaw Road is the hill on the right going up from Sharrow Vale Road. I reckon it is from the Hallam towers. Nigel L
    1 point
  12. Yes, It is the same street but The door to Donna Hartley's fitness club was Just round the corner (opposite Dixons shop) between the top view and The Moor. It had no back door other than a fire escape because it wasn't at ground level. Donna Hartley took over the Gym which was previously known as The Gateway to Health and I used to train there in the 60's
    1 point
  13. I was told many years ago that the original Change Alley was where the money changers did their business, they were mainly Jewish and not allowed to ply their trade within the walls of Sheffield Castle. I’ve no evidence to support this but thought it worth posting.
    1 point
  14. In case anyone is wondering on the position of these 1980's pictures. I can take you through them. The first picture is platform 3 the top end with the lines in the foreground leading over the Wicker Arches. Between the column of stone and the red light signal is the fuzzy image of the signal box, which I mentioned that I had to avoid the signalman in my last post. Picture two and three is platform two looking down the other way to the above picture. You can see the remains of the bay platform or platform one which would not need to be accessed by the subway system or bridges. The ba
    1 point
  15. Incidentally I think the good folks of Woodseats and thereabouts owe a MASSIVE debt to Ray ? Brightman who must have been constantly out with his camera capturing what would have been mundane street scenes but have captured the changes over a significant period and comprise the bulk of Picture Sheffield’s catalogue
    1 point
  16. I’d sort of worked out it must be between very late 60s and late 70s and Edmunds photos verify that. I notice on the last pic that the building was Seashells cafe at the time
    1 point
  17. We watched the full monty last bit and Realised this is a still from the film!
    1 point
  18. I lived opposite the camp on Raeburn Road, late 5Os when the maisonettes were newly built so had a grandstand view of what to a young lad, was a fascinating place. Yes definitely two ‘gate guards’ ; a wartime monoplane fighter ( I’d have said a Hurricane but bow to better recall of others. Similarly, I’d have said in camo colours but unsure now. Certain however that’s its small (jet fighter) companion was silver though couldn’t now state its type). Recall the ’At Home Days’. Also the active maingate/guardroom. I believe that the place even had its own (WAAF) band! My understanding was
    1 point
  19. I guess back in in 80s/90s I had a very interesting conversation with the old fella who ran what I think would be called a ‘Little Mesters’ workshop directly behind Morton’s (though I think unconnected ) where the flats complex now is. He was showing me some ‘serious’ and very expensive (non-Rambo!) hunting/survival knives which he was making and selling to selected customers only. He was situated on a narrow lane, first right down the lane in the photo, now blocked with a lamp standard and a grit bin. He said that a car load of ordinary looking guys dressed in jeans etc, had some months b
    1 point
  20. Whoops! Yes, it is obviously Abbey Lane, I don't know why I made that error. Possibly my early onset something or other. 20 Abbey Lane: 1904 - 1911 Joseph Evans, Company Secretary (tool firm) 1907 - 1915 George Sampson & Son Auctioneers, Valuers and Estate Agents (run by Harry and Edward Sampson) Harry was secretary of the Norton Show 1920 Abbey Garage - proprietor Walker 1925 Frederick Wood proprietor of Abbey Garage 1920 - 1939 S Higton & Sons builders, joiners and contractors, run by Charles and Thomas Higton. In 1939 Thomas Higton (bricklayer) wife E
    1 point
  21. I managed to sneak onto the station in the late 1970 via the cattle dock bay and used the white steps to get onto the platform. We had to sneak pass the signal box when the guy wasn't looking. It was bit more intact at that point too. It always fascinated me even to this day. I suppose it was due to the fact that it was very different to Midland Station. Being raised above ground and having the electric overhead wires running through it. The style of the buildings was different to the Midland and for someone interested in train spotting there was the possibility of seeing locos that didn't go
    1 point
  22. RichardB posted a photo in June 2009 of a street with terraced houses on one side and asked if anyone knew where it was. I have only just joined this site and seen it whilst researching Carnarvon Street where I lived as a child. I don’t know how to negotiate this site and display photos yet but I am 100% sure that it shows my house on Carnarvon Street. I don’t know if his question asking where it was has been answered, so my apologies if it has. I wonder if it could be reposted so that I might look at the answers. Thankyou
    1 point
  23. No, that building is Sheaf House at the railway station. The picture is definitely Olive Grove sports ground. The clubhouse was demolished some years ago and replaced with a more modern building. Used to go there for meetings when I worked for the council.
    1 point
  24. I understand that this scene was filmed in the early hours of the morning using some impressive lighting set up to simulate daylight which explains why there are no other people about and it's so quiet.
    1 point
  25. ROLL OF HONOUR CIVILIAN WAR DEAD SHEFFIELD 1939-1945 The list below details the Surname-First Name- Age - Date of Death or Injury -Place of Death or Injury Abbey Ada 77 yrs 12 Dec 1940 422 Springvale Road Abbott Thomas 40 yrs 12 Dec 1940 103 Bloar Street Addy Gertrude 56 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Addy Joseph 57 yrs 13 Dec 1940 9 Windsor Road Alcock Frederick 50 yrs 13 Dec 1940 34 St Marys Road Allen Mary 32 yrs 12 Dec 1940 High Street Antcliffe Arthur 10 yrs 15 Dec 1940 96 B
    1 point
  26. Well there are circa 70 in operation throughout the U.K. so there has to be a good reason why a city the size of Sheffield is unable to keep one open. Our son used to love his weekly trip to Sheffield Ski Village in the 1980’s, I recall it being both very well run and attended, answers on a postcard please.
    1 point
  27. My guess would be Balaclava Road. It's blocked off at the bottom end. The white line runs from the bottom of the ski slope, past the circle that was the gas holder and continues through the Infirmary Road Aldi. Balaclava Road is close by and the Council website shows planning permission granted for new buildings at Antiquity Ltd on this road.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Oh dear, this place has very painful memories for me. In 1972 I got a job with Trebor Sharps as a trainee sales rep with a company car (a maroon escort estate) and to celebrate I took some mates out in Sheffield. We went to the Mulberry Bush, Stonehouse, and Blue Bell as I remember, and we were stopped by the police down near Castle Market somewhere. I was breathalysed and took to West Bar. A doctor came and took a blood sample, I'd been on pints of shandy, but I thought the worst and was devastated at ruining my chance. After an awful two weeks I got a letter saying the test was negative a
    1 point
  30. No it was about a mile away, my mistake, High House Brewery would be a better guess. Henry James Dearden brewer High House Brewery 1854 directory
    1 point
  31. Hi. Some of this (if not all) was filmed in the workshops of Sanderson Kaysers on Newhall Road, Attercliffe. My dad worked there for 40+ years and was still there when filming took place.
    1 point
  32. Yeah just watched the film and heard him say that! "alright alright.. don't get t'benny on" I've heard it a few times in my life but not often and don't hear it at all anymore Not a Sheffield phrase I've ever heard used as part of everyday life?
    1 point
  33. Loved the film and was impressed by Robert Carlyle's Sheffield accent. But in the canal scene he used an expression I have never heard here; - "he's got a benny on" Anyone else use this?
    1 point
  34. Compleat is an archaic spelling of the word complete. Died out around the end of the 18th Century.
    1 point
  35. Nice, but not like Sheffield used to be at Christmas. We were so well known for our displays, coach loads of people travelled to our wonderful 'CITY LIGHTS', glorious from one end of town to the other. There were fantastic Grotto's in the stores, always a Santa's Forest somewhere! Loads of open street stalls selling everything you can think of, the smashing smell of MULLED WINE wafting around, sometime even real Reindeer. The experience all lifted with the sound of a Sally Army band playing Carols, and groups of children singing. The PEACE GARDENS as they were then wer
    1 point
  36. The major problem with the old Great Central was that its London extension served lots of "cabbage patches" and, having been built at great cost, scarcely ever made a satisfactory financial return. Its line into the capital had not a single level crossing and was built to the Continental loading gauge. Its best locomotives were second to none...as was its best rolling stock, signalling and safety measures Sheffield Victoria was doomed as soon as the system became part of the Midland Region....who had no time for another line into London... especially as freight and passengers returns we
    1 point
  37. Some of the crosses mentioned in this thread appear in this 1736 map of Sheffield city centre.. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    1 point
  38. Memory Dance: Local History History - Parks And Leisure Trailer (Ep 1) Parks and Leisure, showcases two home movies shot in the Peak and the Park (courtesy of the Andy Horsfield 60's archive), alongside a beautiful trip to a sweltering 1970s Sheffield Summer in the documentary, Free For All. Full broadcast begins 7PM, Wed 25 Nov 2020! Watch on Sheffield Live! TV (Freeview 7, Virgin 159, www.sheffieldlive.org/tv ) Stay updated by attending our online event > HERE < Another fantastic Sheffield Video! Watch video here 👉 Anyone remember the sweltering
    1 point
  39. When I first joined this brilliant forum it was just a new thing to me and I suppose it was for the other members too, but over time the forum has developed and come of age, the appearance and general lay out is very good, I especially love the old Sheffield coat of arms, a bit of colour in these dark times does bring some comfort to my old heart.
    1 point
  40. THE CRAZY DAISY NIGHTCLUB High Street Sheffield LOCATION High Street - Sheffield (red marks where the entrance used to be) STAFF DJ - Martin Manterfield (unfortunately he passed away) You had to go downstairs to the below street level late night bar. It was probably most famous for it being the venue that Phil Oakey from the Human League met Suzanne and Joanne and signed them up for the band ! PICS magdelaine - live @ the craisy daisy - 1975 Do you have any memories of the Crazy Daisy ? (no matter how hazy !) let us know, click reply and te
    1 point
  41. I see two women, in the middle of the road, dodging the low-flying reindeer. More numerous than seagulls on Bridlington sea-front they were. In those days, you used to get whole flocks of them, (women shoppers and reindeer), around Sheffield City Centre at that time of year. You don't tend to see so many of either these days. Jute coal-sacks - blooming awful things to carry when soaking wet, even more so when you had a lot of slack in the coal.
    1 point
  42. Has anyone noticed in the old photos of Sheffield shops, that quite a few had prices of goods painted on the outside wall, does this mean that prices were pretty stable? If it was today the painter wouldn't be at the bottom of his ladder before he had to up again to alter the price.
    1 point
  43. The more I look at it the more I think there's something else "underneath" the more obvious writing. This is what I'm sure is there so far. But what's behind I'm still trying to work out.
    1 point
  44. Was it Banners that had the tube system, Where you paid for your goods and the assistant put the money in a plastic container placed it in a tube and it sucked it through some pipes then returned with your change and receipt or am i thinking of some other shop??
    1 point
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