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  1. Modern day recyclable & very useful tree.
    3 points
  2. On the carpark gates of the former (well they are closing it down) Sheffied Health and Social Care HQ on Woofinden Road is a plaque with the letters GWCH on it. Has anyone got any ideas? I have attached photos of the plaque, the gate lock which says something like "Hydes & ????? Sheffield" Your thoughts?
    2 points
  3. The restaurant at the junction of Harmer Lane and Pond St was a Civic Restaurant, one of several in the city built during WWII to provide cheap, nourishing meals "for the workers". I recall going there with my mother in what would have been 1946/47 and enjoying such "treats" as brown windsor soup. Another was later to become the car tax office in Eyre St near the Graves Art Gallery and there was one at the top of Boston St/London Road. Another was opposite the back of the City Hall in Holly Green. There must be many memories associated with these places. I don't recall the rest of that triangle being a timber yard. I rather recall it as something of a steel works. But I can not be sure. The piece of land shown as a car park remained an unsurfaced car park for several decades. I always had the impression it was a bomb-site. Across Pond St was another bomb-site surrounded for many years by tall hoardings. It then got swallowed up the the never ending expansion of the College of Technology/Polytechnic/Hallam University.
    2 points
  4. Circa 1954 https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/4008-os-maps-of-sheffield-and-district-1950s
    2 points
  5. That's not very clear. Images pinched from this site and posted on facebook tend to be crap, try this one 😁
    2 points
  6. Hi I believe my grandfather and his family lived in some old cottages in Ridgeway, either very close to where the Craft Centre is/was or could have been the buildings converted to form the Craft Centre - which I know is now closed. Granddad was born 1887 and the family are shown as living there on the 1901 census. Granddad was still at school on the census but I know that he became a farm labourer and worked perhaps at Fiddlers farm and Rhodes farm on High Lane before he joined the army in 1912. I remember when the craft centre opened there were some big boards which had pictures showing the buildings as they were before the craft centre project started - presumably/hopefully the pictures were of where my grandfather and family lived. Does anybody have any of the pictures or know or can suggest how I might get them? I know that Ridgeway village was in Derbyshire then - may now be in Sheffield if the boundaries have moved. Thanks
    1 point
  7. I've just seen this paragraph on "The Hustle" (a website that DuckDuckGo picked): "South America — a catch-all for what is now Latin America — was the inevitable target". Seriously, is "South America" now no longer a polite continent? Does anyone looking at a globe of world map not notice that there is a large chunk of land in the south of the Americas? Mad!
    1 point
  8. I loved the steps you speak of down from Arundel Street, as I did the Adelphi sadly I was to young to enter the premises but I do remember the newsagent on Tudor Street, it was here that most young lads of my age always hovered looking at the window display, looking for strategically place copies of **** & Span etc, , for our younger readers **** & Span was a girlie magazine of the time, full of nudes.
    1 point
  9. This photo taken from Pinstone Street, shows a carrier and his lad waiting for custom, the tower in the background is part of the ventilation system of the Albert Hall, the smoking chimneys in the foreground belong to the Yorkshireman Arms, soon to be raised to the ground under a false pretext.
    1 point
  10. There is an interesting cover on Westbourne Road, Glossop Road end, set in the footpath, if I still have the picture I will post it for you, I’m sure it was something to do with telephones.
    1 point
  11. The Brooke Bond PG Tips picture cards. We have the full book of The Saga of Ships. You tended to get loads of the same cards and often never got the full set before thy started another series. I have an inlay card that shows what you could get. I also remember Walls Sausages doing a set of 3D pictures of dinosaurs. We had a lot of sausages when that was on. Mum was in trouble if she brought the wrong make of sausages
    1 point
  12. Hi, I have been a member for years. Born 1955. Well traveled but I have lived in Sheffield all my life. Experienced nature lover especially expert in the birdlife around Sheffield. Parson cross, Hillsborough and town canter have been my stomping ground. I am a real ale fan and me and my wife have been in all the pubs open and closed in most areas around Sheffpeld. I have asked for information about Wadsley Bridge brick yard and quarry where I used to play in the 60s but so far to no avail.
    1 point
  13. "GWCH" George Woofinden Convalescent Home(s).
    1 point
  14. Back in the 1960's whilst at University I had a summer job with a contractor working as a brickies labourer relining the furnaces, mainly at Steel Peech and Tozer. The furnaces were shut off for Works Week and we started work the following day. The reheating furnaces were still hot enough to melt rubber soled boots and we worked in pairs and could only stay in for a very short time before being pulled out and another pair sent in. Our job was to knock the bricks lining the walls onto the floor and the they were subsequently tossed out. Once cleared our job was to keep the brickies supplied with bricks. We worked 12 hour shifts but the rate of pay was top dollar and three weeks work would keep me all summer. No Health and Safety in those days.!! The worst job was relining the Electric Arc Furnaces. Prior to the bricks being lined, a bed of dolomite powder was prepared. This came as a fine powder and had to be packed using a cube of concrete on a rod. Every time the block came down the dust would puther up in your face - no face masks only handkerchiefs. As the Ganger in charge of us would frequently tell us "This is the University of Life"
    1 point
  15. Great information, many thanks
    1 point
  16. I doubt it so why would there be any graves there, in the 19th century the area was bounded by Alsop Field and the working town full of small industries from horn and bone merchants to grinders and cutlers, so if there were any graves I would be surprised.
    1 point
  17. I didn’t say the council dug it up but it’s under the remit of Amey but it’s quite obvious they do not monitor their contractors. As for replacements, there’s always , always more ordered than needed so you can see them in depots around the city or as seen they use any overstock by dumping them in other large fills, before any says how do you know my brother saw it on happen many times. The photo shows a garden constructed with unwanted stones, block paving etc that Amey were intent on just throwing away.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Yes they did. …armour plate, files, forging, castings, springs, rails, railway axles, railway tyres etc.They also had a steelworks in Penistone and they also built ships at Birkenhead.
    1 point
  20. Section from an an image in the Pond Street Bus Station topic.
    1 point
  21. A name I hadn't heard for many years. My only memory of it is that it had the last request stop before my 102 'bus pulled into Pond Street. I suppose that was for the convenience of people wishing, as I did, to catch the 'buses (54, 55, 60) which started from just round the corner, opposite the Midland station, or perhaps those who were catching trains. But I last used that request stop in the 1960s! ion.
    1 point
  22. If you or I lived there I’m sure we would try our best to find more about him, I may contact them by post to ask the question.
    1 point
  23. I took the attached pictures below for a project on the 5 weirs walk - the images were taken from Effingham Street looking towards Savile street. The weir was apparently constructed to provide water for the Upper and Nether Walk cutlers and grinders according to the internet, but I can't find any mention of these on the net. You can see the stone arch, presumably to divert the water to the mills. Anyone have any information on the cutlers or grinders who might have used this weir? thanks
    1 point
  24. In the late 70's I was a member of the WF , our group met at Thornbridge School. I can't recall a deal, other than enjoying a camping trip and being appalled at country dancing, which I think caused me to stop attending.
    1 point
  25. 1965. 156/160, Wm. Geo. Jenkinson Ltd., Plumbers, on right .. https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=;s21521
    1 point
  26. Jenkinson William George R P C. plumber &c. 43 Eyre Street. (1925 directory). Edit: Jenkinson William Geo., plumber, 43 Eyre Street. (1901, 1905 & 1911 directories).
    1 point
  27. Pepper Alley shown on the map has a remnant still surviving today alongside the Upper Chapel on Norfolk Street. The pictures show what's left today and as it looked like from Fargate.
    1 point
  28. Sparse it may be but is it not fascinating to recognize the same street layout of 1771 that most members of this group have walked? Chapel Walk linking Fargate to Norfolk Street... Gosh! 😍
    1 point
  29. Not sure whether this is the done thing but I've unearthed these pictures from my family collection that feature my grandfather, Charles Wainwright, who was a member of the society after he returned from service overseas...... The first two are from the 1947 production of Over She Goes..... the third of The Girl Friend.....
    1 point
  30. This looks like Swinton Street and Chatham Street junction just above Bridgehouses.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Happy memories Heartshome, I don’t think I ever saw my mother without her pinny in the house, I seem to recall the other mums near me wore either a wrap round or an tie back apron, seems they had to protect their clothes from the daily splashes from their home running life, todays lifestyle enables women not to bother about whatever residue and splashes landed on them, get changed and throw them in the washer that’s now the order of the day, my mothers wash day was Saturday as that was the only day she didn’t work. Times certainly have changed, washing done any day of the week by using the timer programme on the washers.
    1 point
  33. Having just watched the movie I was confused about the school and thought it a bit strange why somebody from either Arbourthorne or Parson Cross was going to a school in Mayfield Valley! Although there was a sort of school there, it certainly wasn't like that one! But having seen the film I could understand why the school was fictional. Homophobic bullying and a teacher telling kids they can't do what they want to do after school. The real school would have been closed down and that teacher sacked! But it was based on a true story!! So somewhere out there is a Sheffield school like that which does allow homophobic bullying and might employ teachers like that. The question is which and is it the only one?
    1 point
  34. I see that the map was engraved by Thomas Jefferys (c. 1719 – 1771), "Geographer to the King". He was a noted engraver working on both sides of the Atlantic and specialising in maps. See the Wikipedia article. He also did the engravings for an encyclopaedia of which I have one of the four volumes: "A Society of Gentlemen. A New and Complete Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. The second edition, with Many additions, and Other improvements. Vol. 2 (D-K). 4 vols. London: W. Owen, 1763." The originals are beautifully sharp and clear and as far as I can tell very accurate.
    1 point
  35. This time of year brings back fond memories of going caroling with my mate on Christmas Eve, coming home to the smell of bakeing, seeing mum standing at the kitchen table in her pinny rolling out pastry for the mince pies she was making, dad would always retreat to the White Swan for a pint on Christmas Eve. Didn't have a pinny! though my wife did buy me an apron for our first Christmas in 71, with the wording I'm the best cook in this house and I've got my wife's permission to say so, didn't have a turban but i did have a flat cap!😊
    1 point
  36. Turbans were usually worn in the workplace.
    1 point
  37. We still have many glass baubles on our tree. Some dating back to the 1950's perhaps earlier! Old glass baubles are now quite valuable. Some were that old that colour came off leaving just a see through bauble. But when I was a kid I painted them with some Airfix paint. Of course many over the years got broken by either falling off the tree or a cat attack! We had plenty of those that had pressed in shapes on one side. But these were often so thin, they broke inside. We have lots of the smaller ones left, the bigger ones being more vulnerable to damage. Like the occasion when my cousin was sat in-front of the tree one Christmas and we were playing a new auction game called "What Am I Bid". There was a small wooden mallet in the game and the auctioneer was my cousin, so as he was saying "going, going, gone..." He lifted the mallet up and hit one of the larger baubles on the tree, which shattered all over the place! In our family the trimmings went up 12 days before Christmas and stayed up 12 days after. Some people don't even wait that long to take them down. Here's a few of them!
    1 point
  38. Yes Lockerbrook Farm , sorry about that but it was a long time ago.
    1 point
  39. The place above Derwent is still thriving and managed by Woodcraft, although any group at all can book this modern 30+ bed hostel, fully equipped for outdoor activities.- called Lockerbrook Farm, not Thornbridge. Stunning views, away from it all. There are still lots of local WF groups in the city, meeting weekly and organising activities and outdoor trips, and have been continuously. Needed now as much as ever, to promote our connections with and enjoyment of nature and with each other, and help us grow into responsible and caring adults.
    1 point
  40. That was Thornbridge Farm
    1 point
  41. Was in Woodcraft folk late 70s at Hackenthorpe . Used to love the hiking on Sundays and camping at Oughtibridge and Thornbridge Farm
    1 point
  42. IIRC, it was originally called 4 Lanes, and was next to Butterworth's bike shop. It was about the only place you could get snap late at night, because a lot of taxi drivers used it.
    1 point
  43. I haven't lived in Sheffield for 46 years but remember Chapel Walk. We often used to go down there on a Saturday morning and I had a friend who worked at Cann's the music shop. I also remember taking part in services and concerts at the Victoria Hall at the bottom of it. It's brought back many happy memories hearing about it again!
    1 point
  44. Just found this picture of the Albert Hall amongst my mother-in-laws old photos - it says it was taken just after the fire
    1 point
  45. 1 point
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