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    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


    • Points

      14

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      6,945


  2. Edmund

    Edmund

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      10

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      1,820


  3. paulhib48

    paulhib48

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      10

    • Content Count

      48


  4. DaveJC

    DaveJC

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      9

    • Content Count

      38


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 22/12/20 in Posts

  1. I started work in 1955 at the Wicker Goods Station, Saville Street and can confirm that wagons such as these were still in very common use in the 50's. I also recall Bogies amongst them too - some I think were used by National Benzole petrol & oil company who were based at Lumley Street.
    2 points
  2. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were th
    2 points
  3. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  4. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    2 points
  5. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  6. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  7. Wow! That's got to be a now missing section of Bard Street, looking down over the top of High Street Lane. They'd be stood on a path in a bit of parkland today (or perhaps have long since slid down into the road depending on recent weather).
    2 points
  8. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  9. The church with the question mark is St. Andrew's, on St. Andrew's Road, now demolished, used to go to Cubs there in the '60's. Nigel L
    2 points
  10. The European cup, once lost, wss subsequently handed in at West Bar Police Station http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8709846.stm It was the most prized piece of silverware in European club football - but one night in a pub in the West Midlands, it went missing. Twenty-eight years later the story of how two teams of police officers played to win the European Cup can finally be told. Very few people knew about the disappearance and subsequent recovery of this famous piece of football silverware in Sheffield. A secret kept for the last 28 years. In May, 1982, Aston Vi
    2 points
  11. I well recall, periodically, spending Saturday afternoons in BGs sumptuous tailors shop, shown here. I was only a kid, 10 or so but even at that tender age couldn’t but be impressed at premises ...the spaciousness of the place - big soft leather couches, piles of expensive ‘coffee table magazines’ which probably cost a chunk out of an average working persons wage, though mainly directed at men in those days, so no ‘Hellos’ or ‘Beanos’ for long - suffering wives and kids waiting for husband or dad to be measured up, fitted, or whatever. Tea, Coffee provide in a civilised way - NO confounded, v
    1 point
  12. There has been an Assay Office in Sheffield since 1773, when local silversmiths, who resented the inconvenience of having to send their wares to London for hallmarking, joined with Birmingham petitioners to ask Parliament for their own Offices. Despite fierce opposition from the London Goldsmiths' Company, an Act of Parliament was passed, granting Sheffield the right to assay silver. Because the Select Committee which considered the petition had uncovered so many abuses by the existing Assay Offices, Parliament made sure that the new ones were more strictly controlled. The Act appointed t
    1 point
  13. Hard to believe we had at least two hospitals dedicated to chest diseases and a full time mass X Ray centre in Ellin St at the bottom of The Moor. (Winter St hospital; King Edwards, Rivelin and I seem to recall there was a dedicated chest unit somewhere around Queens Road/ Olive Grove area but also Nether Edge Hospital, Fir Vale and Lodge Moor all had chest units. My own father died of lung cancer in Lodge Moor.)
    1 point
  14. It was a beerhouse (on licensed) at the time of the auction referenced and until it's demise. I can't say definitively what happened to the licence at present (it falls within ongoing research), but can suggest a probable chain of events. The long term licensee left in 1880 and is known to have run other premises after that date. It is likely that he transfered out close to the time the property came up for let in the middle of the year, however, by September, when fixtures and fittings were advertised for sale, he was named as seller. The sale in itself doesn't necesarily indicate closure (i
    1 point
  15. https://www.picturesheffield.com/search&St_Nathanael_Church St. Nathanael's Church, Roebuck Road, Upperthorpe
    1 point
  16. As a sufferer of Acrophobia I can’t even imagine living in the business end of a high rise building. It’s nothing to do with council accommodation, I would feel just the same in a multi million pound penthouse, remember Richard Gere in Pretty Woman with Julia Roberts all but hanging over his penthouse balcony and him attempting to melt into wall farest from it, well other than for the Julia Roberts deficiency, that was me to a tee. I’ve often wondered if folk with my fears are identified by the council prior to being housed in such buildings, in the private housing market it’s easy, don’t
    1 point
  17. Yes, Looking across High Street towards Change Alley !
    1 point
  18. This set is around the end of Sheffield Road and Shepcote Lane, with some photos taken from top deck of Tinsley viaduct. 3rd one down is the transport cafe, next door to the Plumpers, now American Golf. If you look on Google maps aerial view, you can still see the ‘CAFE’ letters painted on the roof.
    1 point
  19. Answer in this thread, which surely must be connected? Huge coincidence if not?
    1 point
  20. FBT was based on Carlisle St. East AND Saville Street (Jncs Windsor St to Princess St) I don't recognise the building, but there WAS a similar building just on Harleston St, (?) where shear bl**es were made (Can't say that can we Neal?) Also look for bessemer house just townside of Harleston St, I'm sure that was FBTs too. I left in 1981.
    1 point
  21. Had a walk in attercliffe earlier and took these photos with comparisons
    1 point
  22. Castle Market from 1965 - remember this?
    1 point
  23. did me when i first saw them. brings back memories of being sat outside halfords as a kid in the 90s in my dads Peugeot 309. back and forth getting alsorts of parts because it was running like a bag of spanners 😄
    1 point
  24. across from Halfords was Somerfields supermarket. and next to it was a discount clothing store called SR Gents if i remember correctly. here are some images i found a while back off a facebook group. i cannot remember the person who uploaded these images. so if the person is on here, i do apologise for posting these and if you wish for me to remove them, then i will do so. and here is a bonus, a pic of the old superbowl/jungle jims next to halfords.
    1 point
  25. Going to cheat and have 2. Central Library - went every few weeks on a midweek evening with my parents and was left to wander round by myself. The marble and high ceilings always fascinated me and it had a particular smell and atmosphere about it. Spent many a happy hour looking at the pictures in the railway books. Sheaf Market - Was taken in there from about 5 years of age (probably earlier but can't remember it). The bustle and range of shops made an impression on me. In the centre by the steps were 2 static childrens 'rides' one of which was a lifeboat that if you put a coin in w
    1 point
  26. No that's the front of the Lescar, the snooker place is behind it, and Cowlishaw Road is the hill on the right going up from Sharrow Vale Road. I reckon it is from the Hallam towers. Nigel L
    1 point
  27. It was the centre of Hell In December 1940!
    1 point
  28. Hello, it is the Covid Christmas Eve ( looking to God and Science for it to be "THE" and not just "A" Covid Christmas Eve). There is nothing on TV that I feel is remotely entertaining, so I thought I will have a look at the on line catalogues for a few upcoming auctions, with the desire for interesting spoons! Do you think that was sad? Have a look at the picture below. Some kind of medicine spoon, 9 inches long and look, "Made in Sheffield" and in "Watts Plate". Never heard of "Watts Plate, research? For me anyway and there could be something for the "spoonophobes" later. Assuming
    1 point
  29. Change Alley does not appear on the 1736 Gosling map. Leonard Webster (Town Trustee 1744-73 and landlord of Kings Head) cut up the bowling green of the Kings Head for building plots, and made the throroughfare called Change Alley. That name is used to describe a way into the yard of a large inn. Although Jewish travellers and journeymen visited Sheffield from the 1650s to buy silverware and cutlery, it was not until 1786 that there is evidence that Jews lived in the town. Isaac and Philip Bright from Biarritz (1786). Jacob Gehrwin (1787) and Abraham Gershon (1797) were the first to live
    1 point
  30. I’d sort of worked out it must be between very late 60s and late 70s and Edmunds photos verify that. I notice on the last pic that the building was Seashells cafe at the time
    1 point
  31. Whoops! Yes, it is obviously Abbey Lane, I don't know why I made that error. Possibly my early onset something or other. 20 Abbey Lane: 1904 - 1911 Joseph Evans, Company Secretary (tool firm) 1907 - 1915 George Sampson & Son Auctioneers, Valuers and Estate Agents (run by Harry and Edward Sampson) Harry was secretary of the Norton Show 1920 Abbey Garage - proprietor Walker 1925 Frederick Wood proprietor of Abbey Garage 1920 - 1939 S Higton & Sons builders, joiners and contractors, run by Charles and Thomas Higton. In 1939 Thomas Higton (bricklayer) wife E
    1 point
  32. Yes. Remember the Slammer in the 70s . I had friends who worked at the Town Hall and it was considered a cool, trendy place to dine Attercliffe style. Very basic menu and limited choice served in large white bowls, I think. It was very unlike the Vesta Beef Curry I’d been buying as a curry connoisseur a few weeks previously.
    1 point
  33. I managed to sneak onto the station in the late 1970 via the cattle dock bay and used the white steps to get onto the platform. We had to sneak pass the signal box when the guy wasn't looking. It was bit more intact at that point too. It always fascinated me even to this day. I suppose it was due to the fact that it was very different to Midland Station. Being raised above ground and having the electric overhead wires running through it. The style of the buildings was different to the Midland and for someone interested in train spotting there was the possibility of seeing locos that didn't go
    1 point
  34. Hi yes I remember the Low Drop it was a little pub in the middle of a load of steel firms I used to work as a wire drawer at a firm called Arther Lee & sons and used to call in there for a couple of pints after shift happy days
    1 point
  35. Well north west, but definitely towards Manchester.
    1 point
  36. No it was about a mile away, my mistake, High House Brewery would be a better guess. Henry James Dearden brewer High House Brewery 1854 directory
    1 point
  37. Yeah just watched the film and heard him say that! "alright alright.. don't get t'benny on" I've heard it a few times in my life but not often and don't hear it at all anymore Not a Sheffield phrase I've ever heard used as part of everyday life?
    1 point
  38. Must say in my life time it's always looked much the same ,from the exterior that is. Much demolition/dismantling was done in the past with materials being reused for new construction in the area.
    1 point
  39. I stand corrected, my spelling skills are nothing compared to those of my dancing. 😜
    1 point
  40. The major problem with the old Great Central was that its London extension served lots of "cabbage patches" and, having been built at great cost, scarcely ever made a satisfactory financial return. Its line into the capital had not a single level crossing and was built to the Continental loading gauge. Its best locomotives were second to none...as was its best rolling stock, signalling and safety measures Sheffield Victoria was doomed as soon as the system became part of the Midland Region....who had no time for another line into London... especially as freight and passengers returns we
    1 point
  41. This map was posted on Twitter by the 'Picture Sheffield' website. I hadn't seen it before and thought others might be interested in browsing it. Apologies if it has been posted before. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    1 point
  42. Some of the crosses mentioned in this thread appear in this 1736 map of Sheffield city centre.. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    1 point
  43. According to the technical info released with the movie the locations given are:- Burbage Rocks, Derbyshire, England. Gleadless Valley, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Heavygate Road, Crookes, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Millstone Edge, Derbyshire, England. The Vine Pub, Cemetary Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Thorpe Marsh Power Station, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. Plus a couple more I noticed Tinsley cooling towers(RIP) Fox & Duck, Sheffield Road Tinsley The Country and Western nigh
    1 point
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