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  1. eldomsmith

    eldomsmith

    Sheffield History Member


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  2. Lemmy117

    Lemmy117

    Sheffield History Member


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  3. tozzin

    tozzin

    Sheffield History Member


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  4. Sheffield History

    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 27/09/20 in Posts

  1. This conversation sounds like an audition for the Teletubbies.
    3 points
  2. I have access to some old photo's related to transport in Sheffield. These were in a pack and look like all from same sequence - they all have the same stamp on the back, one has "Sheffield Transport" written in pencil on the back. They could be from Queens Road but that is little more than an educated guess The last image piqued my interest. It has what looks like a mini version Tower of London at the back. Does this mean they are NOT Sheffield? I did see a post from Arif here Pic of Walker and Hall which has a vaguely similar building to the right of Walker and Hall. So where is this? I
    2 points
  3. It was chucking it down!!. Mum and dad took me to see the parade and we stood on the Moor in front of British Home Stores, which as the doors were set back offered a bit of shelter. I remember the lights on the illuminated trams going past and being soaked. Apparently I told dad I wanted to be a tram driver, he told me not to be so daft, but then again I was only three years old. Fast forward thirty odd years and I joined the tramway museum at Crich, and eventually got to be a tram driver, and got to drive the Last Tram I had seen that night.
    2 points
  4. In it's application for licence it was stated to contain "46 bedrooms and on the first floor were commercial, dining, smoking, and coffee rooms, and on the ground floor a first-class luncheon bar had been fitted up. The furniture and fittings of the house were of a most superior character and had cost £3,500. The site had cost £3,400, the building £5,000."
    1 point
  5. There were two Imperial Hotels in Sheffield in 1897, though your artefact does refer to the one on Castle Street. It was a relatively short lived establishment, first licensed in 1874 as a "first class hotel". During WWI it was used (and seemingly taken over) by the Ministry of Munitions. The licence was not renewed in 1918 after it had ceased to operate as a licensed premises in September 1917.
    1 point
  6. On the far left of this 1905 picture. (C) Picture Sheffield --- https://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s14170&pos=19&action=zoom&id=16993
    1 point
  7. 1 Castle Street. In 1881 William Shaper and by 1901 Thomas Browning. (Kelly's and White's directories) 1881 1901
    1 point
  8. In the wealth of Sheffield Transport photos' are these two showing great photo's of Sheffield Trams. Does anyone have any info on where these two images are from? One is of interest in particular as it would have been my Tram home from wherever it is to Intake!
    1 point
  9. It must be Sheffield Transport canteen on Castlegate, I had many meals in there, but over 40/50 years ago, those ladies cooked some fine food but non of the modern foreign stuff.
    1 point
  10. A short video about the church here.
    1 point
  11. OK not strictly buses/trams, here are a couple of photos from a large transport archive showing inspection of a taxi at East Bank Garage following a collision in 1965. They are Sheffield Transport originals so a record of the incident. Also text from rear. Hope they may be of interest.
    1 point
  12. Another picture for this topic Pond Street Bus Station 1951. Rear of photo is included for interest
    1 point
  13. These images show Sheffield Transport images of a bus crash on Leopold Street - date unknown. I've included the notes on the back of each photo This may be 1965
    1 point
  14. Tomorrow (8th October) marks the 60th anniversary of the closure of the first generation tram system, and the last tram in the closing procession, Roberts car no. 510, is now at the tramway museum at Crich in Derbyshire. While won't be in service tomorrow, it will be outside the depots for photographic purposes. I will be driving one of the two trams in service, if you visit, come and say hello. Nigel L
    1 point
  15. All six uploaded to your site.
    1 point
  16. Ecclesfield Road near Chapeltown
    1 point
  17. Er no, the furthest I’ve been is Glaslough in Co Monaghan.
    1 point
  18. I wrote about this question to a friend of mine who has a long-established cutlery company, Pinder Bros, (https://www.pinder.co.uk), in Sheffield. Here is his reply: "Dear Jonathan, Most interesting. ‘Pinro’ was a trademark we used around 60 years ago for the company’s value range of cutlery. We did have a football team after the Second World War for around 10 years. Please pass information on where possible. With kind regards, D A Pinder OBE DIRECTOR"
    1 point
  19. They know what we want. So yes, more student flats it will be.
    1 point
  20. Closure started with withdrawal of the Express passenger services in 1960. The last bit was the service between Rugby and Nottingham and that finished in 1969. Only the Chiltern services out of London to Aylesbury remain. After several false starts work on the channel tunnel finally started in 1988, so well after the GC closed.
    1 point
  21. Thnaks Syrup - thats it !!"
    1 point
  22. Next block of student flats coming up?
    1 point
  23. From that video it looks like the digs are over and they are not going to dig the entire site. So lots of questions will go unanswered. And the future? Well it looks like some kind of theme park, but not in the park sense of things, more like the technology park in Attercliffe, with commercial projects on the site, even a a funfair! The archaeology hidden away to protect it. Rather like the findings of previous digs, not on display, but stored in vaults, with access to university professors only and the like. Having looked recently on a 3D computer display with glasses that you put on yo
    1 point
  24. The Council of Europe funded 'Drainspotting' project that I won earlier this year has begun. We have six months to find and log as much as we can of Sheffield's historic pavement features. Our app enables people to photograph and GPS plot their finds and we will draw up the maps showing the locations of the important finds, how many are left, and what that tells us. Anyone interested in being involved I'd love to hear from you! streetheritageresearchgroup@gmail.com https://sites.google.com/view/streetheritage/the-street-heritage-research-group https://w
    1 point
  25. Inspired by your diligent work, we may all be in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars... (probably a Wilde misquote)
    1 point
  26. A picture of an oil painting of Sheffield General Infirmary viewed from around Port Mahon in 1798 and an interesting 1826 map of the area drawn just before the whole area was developed.
    1 point
  27. In an earlier review of Hospital requirements it was proposed to build a new hospital for the south of the City. 190 acres of land was acquired at Coal Aston under the Public Health Act of 1875 and, in a strange twist of fate, the proposed Sheffield Airport was then planned to be built there. By 1933 priorities had change...and the War intervened . Neither was built...the land being used for municipal housing. As an aside, the Northern General is a rambling "Ponderosa"...confusing to the occasional vistor and guaranteed to increase blood pressure if attempting to park a car!😉
    1 point
  28. I had my tonsils out there in 1949 age 5; go in morning & out by tea time having been told to eat ice cream ! I recall anasethetic being dropped onto mask over my nose plus a glass jar with liquid in it on window ledge which looked as though it had tonsils floating inside it ! My wife was a student nurse living at the Nurses Home called Centenery House there from 1964 - 1966. We went in the underground tunnels to go from block to block when it rained.
    1 point
  29. From memory it was very much a “dance music” sort of place. in the 90s I remember there seemed to be 3 types of club catering for 3 groups 1. the dance crowd 2. the indie crowd 3. the cheesy pop crowd i think I went in once and didn’t stay long!
    1 point
  30. Here's a great video by a real train driver filmed by him, with explanations of the route taken this year. With unedited passage through tunnels and yes Totley Tunnel. The only time he stops the video is waiting time at stations. Things to watch for include the speed signs, especially into Sheffield. Plus how quickly the train accelerators. When he stops the train in a station, the driver has to know when to apply the brakes. There's nothing telling him now stop for the next station.
    1 point
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