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Showing content with the highest reputation since 22/07/19 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    If my memory serves me well, it doesn't usually, I seem to remember that it was used as a stand for milk churns awaiting collection. I may possibly remember a fellow miscreant trying to get one of the lids off to quench a thirst but if pressed I would plead the UK version of the fifth amendment
  2. 2 points
    I'm not sure what the item is, but I'm pretty sure it doesn't relate to the trams. The trolley pole of a tram is insulated all the way to the end, with only the small wheel on the tip being live. The 550V DC was then carried down a heavy cable inside the hollow metal pole, first to a circuit breaker, then to the lighting circuit and controllers and then on to the motors. The pole was turned either by the conductor pulling on a rope from ground level, which was permanently attached to the trolley head, or by using a seperate bamboo pole when no rope was fitted. What it may be (although I've never seen one anything like this) is a device for recovering a "grounded" tram. Grounding occurs when the wheels become electically isolated from the track, which forms the negative return for the electrical circuit. Besides stopping the tram, grounding can be quite dangerous as the high voltage DV tries to find the shortest route it can from the overhead wire to the tracks. If it can't pass through the motors etc and out through the wheels there is a very good chance it will pass into the body of the tramcar. If this happens, anyone standing on or near the tracks (particularly on a damp day) who touches the tram will likely complete the circuit and experience a 550V DC shock. If they were to grap a handrail the shock would likely make theior muscles contract, meaning they are unable to let go, so prolonging the peroid of shock. The official way the Tramway Museum at Crich deal with a grounding is for everyone aboard the tram to be kept aboard. One of the platform staff (usually the conductor) then JUMPS off, making sure their body entirely leaves the tram before any part of them touches the ground. Next, using either the iulated rope attached to the trolley or a bamboo pole which can be found at staategic points along the route, the trolley is hooked down off the wire to cut off the electrical supply to the vehicle. The tram is then pushed or pulled ontpo a cleaner bit of track, where hopefully it's no longer grounded when the power is restored. This can be checled easily by turning the saloon lights on. There are other simpler 'dirty' methods for dealing with a grounding. One involves jumping from the tram and then throwing a bucket of water under the wheels. The water is a pretty good conductor at these voltages and will also swill away some of the dirt from the rails. This trick usually works and was common in the days when fire buckets full of water were common place. The other method, and also the most risky, is to jump from the tram with the point iron in your hand. The point iron is a thing a bit like a crowbar that all trams carry for changing the points. Just infront of the tram you have to wedge the end of the point iron into the groove of the track, making sure it is in contact with good metal. Then, with a swift and positive motion, ram the other end of the point iron down across the fender of the tram, scraping off as much paint as you can as you do so. The theory is because you made the connection with the track first, when the point iron touches the tram the current travels down the metal bar to the track without harming the person holding it. However if you get it the wrong way around and touch it on the tram first, then you'll likely get a 550V DC whack! I knew a chap who made this mistake while on a special tram tour in Sheffield in the late 50s or early 60s, which ran over some disused and hence dirty tracks. He didn't remember much about the shock, but woke up on the opposite side of the Moor to where he started! Luckily he lived to tell the tale! The thing on the pole could be something for wedging in the track and then attaching to the tram. Or it may be something for holding down the trolley if no rope is fitted and it can't be tied to the rear fender, which is the normal practice.
  3. 2 points
    Hi Stu, that's a pity they not the right photo's. With the photo's taken with the bare ground around all those years ago, not easy to tell, as the Lodge can't be seen from among the trees now. I have informed Picture Sheffield that they are incorrect. I will do some more research for you, and ask my friend, who knows nearly everyone from way back around the area, if one of the families may have a photo. I understand that a family member of the farm, was a Redmires Game Keeper for a while, maybe he did some work for the Lodge. There are quite a few Old Maps showing the Lodge and the Green. Extra Information !!! - NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE - London Standard JAN 25th 1913 - Mr DANIEL DONCASTER age 77 of FAIRTHORN LODGE, REDMIRES, SHEFFIELD. Steel Manufacturer & Merchant. LATE of Messers; DANIEL DONCASTER and Sons (Limited ) - left bequests to Charities; net personality, £34,441 - £37,868
  4. 2 points
    Been back to the Strines today, so I photographed the hare, who had a bad Christmas that year.
  5. 1 point
    Hi John I have found this article that may help your quest a little. Sheffield Daily Telegraph 12 April 1883
  6. 1 point
    Hello Adrian , this one is by Atkinson Bros but looks like it may be the same pattern and said to be a scarce pattern British WW2 two blade Army clasp knife that were produced by several manufacturers in small numbers during WW2. Full description here ------ https://www.fieldserviceantiquearms.co.uk/british-ww2-army-2-blade-clasp-knife--refd1865-2164-p.asp
  7. 1 point
    Hi everyone, I was just been given an army type knife and just this moment removed enough rust only to find the cutler you have been discussing, Joseph Eliot &sons, was looking for info on it and Sheffield history came up , not sure what the age of the knife is at a guess I would say 1940,ISH.but would like some opinions on that please. Thank you.
  8. 1 point
    Good evening Syrup, Thank you so much for posting the press cutting naming Pc Lewis - fantastic stuff! This is the sort of stuff that helps to bring these old photographs to life and remind us that these were real people living their lives in an age when life was harder than many of us will ever experience. Steve
  9. 1 point
    I've seen a photo of some flats & shops on Duke Street that I never knew existed having lived in Sheffield all my life (1963) .Does anyone know when these buildings were erected and demolished?
  10. 1 point
    Embassy Court flats, built in the mid 1930's. http://www.picturesheffield.com/;s26150
  11. 1 point
    Hi Folks, Now available as a podcast. Link to listen here - http://smarturl.it/MyLifeInTheMosh All the best Roger
  12. 1 point
    I was at Nether Green school. One afternoon a week we had to go down to Hunters bar school for woodwork classes. My mother went to Hunters Bar school as a junior. The attached photo could be the pupils celebrating the end of WW1 when she was there.
  13. 1 point
    Was in Town today, so spent some time looking at the stones around the Cathedral, did not come across Martha Pass, but I did notice that a few of the stones were partialy grassed over.
  14. 1 point
    I think that 'Mrs' is actually 'Mos' = Months I suspect the middle bit is abbreviations and is the same thing in each except that in the first entry it's not quite so abbreviated. A guess: line 1 frm labr ?farm labour/labourer lines 2&3 flabr ?same but more abbreviated I can't think what the last item is - _ide Where was this convict held/living? Hugh
  15. 1 point
    Workman's Boarding House No. 78, 80, 82, Pond Street. Court No. 10, at rear, left
  16. 1 point
    Thanks for these Syrup. It's a real shame that there weren't any photographs to accompany the articles. It would have been the jackpot!
  17. 1 point
    Last one. Sheffield Independent 01 August 1933
  18. 1 point
    Fairthorn Lodge to let rent £60 per year. Sheffield Daily Telegraph 31 May 1927
  19. 1 point
    Fairthorn Lodge and Farm to be sold by Auction. Sheffield Daily Telegraph 10 April 1915
  20. 1 point
    Mr Daniel Doncasters Will. ( The Scarborough item is not related ) Sheffield Daily Telegraph 25 January 1913
  21. 1 point
    I have found a few articles in the newspapers that might help in a small way. Mr and Mrs D Doncaster, meeting two hundred Guests in a tent in the beautiful grounds of Fairthorne Lodge. Sheffield Daily Telegraph 17 August 1909
  22. 1 point
    Picture sheffield image links - http://www.picturesheffield.com/search&keywords=Keywords Fairthorne_Lodge Map showing both Fairthorn Lodge and "Fairthorn Green/Fairthorn Farm". Revised: 1914, Published: 1924. https://maps.nls.uk/view/101600175
  23. 1 point
    Hi Stu, bit of info for you:- Father Daniel Doncaster b 1908 Sheffield - Mother Maria (Mallinson) b 1812 Daniel Doncaster b 29-11-1834 Upperthorpe, Sheffield - 1868 Married Mary Jane Miller ( she died 6-11-1916 Edinburgh) CHILDREN - Edwin Daniel D b 1872 Sheffield and Norman Miller D b 1874 Other address Green Bank, Victoria Road, Sheffield He died at Fairthorn Lodge - 7-10-1912 - and is buried in Christ Church, Fulwood HOPE THIS HELPS YOU Extra Information!!! Go to PICTURE SHEFFIELD - put in Fairthorn Lodge there are 2 PHOTOGRAPHS really good ones to.
  24. 1 point
    Yes, the red line you have marked is where the steps were, although, they were in a straight line, all the way up to the (then) back of the Lyceum.... marked in your map as Grand Circus. The number of times I have raced up those steps, after getting off my bus in Pond Street, in order to get to the Gaumont, Cinema House,Hippodrome,Palace,etc, in time for the start of the picture.
  25. 1 point
    An updated list of Surviving vehicles acquired new / second hand or loaned to SYPTE. Surviving South Yorkshire PTE motorbuses Single-deckers 80 KCR 108P Leyland National 10351/2R / Leyland (ex Portsmouth) 79 KSO 74P Leyland National 10351/2R / Leyland (ex Grampian) 11 AAK 111T Leyland National 10351B/1R / Leyland 1075 FWA 475V Leyland National NL106L11/1R / Leyland 22 KWA 22W Leyland National NL116L11/1R / Leyland 76 B976 DWG Dennis Dorchester / Plaxton (B674 GWJ) 41 C41 HDT Dennis Domino / Optare 53 C53 HDT Dennis Domino / Optare Single-deckers hired during 1981 crisis 1972 GAT 180D Leyland Panther PSUR1/1 / Roe (hired from Kingston upon Hull CT 3-4/81) Single-deckers hired for trials and evaluation 1004 GNC 276N Seddon-Lucas / Pennine (hired from GMPTE) Bendi-buses 2006 CRM 927T Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2009 FHE 292V Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2010 FWA 450V Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2013 C113 HDT Leyland-DAB /Leyland-DAB Double-deckers 377 LWB 377P Ailsa B55-10 / Van-Hool McArdle 388 LWB 388P Ailsa B55-10 / Van-Hool McArdle 1647 XWG 647T Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1655 XWG 655T Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1696 CWG 696V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Alexander 1707 CWG 707V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Alexander 1756 CWG 756V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1861 JHE 161W Metrobus DR104 / MCW 1781 JKW 281W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Alexander 1790 JKW 290W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Alexander 1831 JKW 331W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Marshall 2120 KKU 120W Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2214 NKU 214X Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2260 SDT 260Y Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2298 A298 XAK Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2317 A317 XAK Dennis Dominator / Northern Counties 1918 A118 XWE Metrobus DR104 / MCW 2414 A414 YAK Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2361 B361 CDT Dennis Domiator / East Lancs 2450 C45 HDT Dennis Dominator / Alexander –hybrid trolleybus 2457 C877 JWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2462 C882 JWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2479 D479 OWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2489 D489 OWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander Double-deckers hired during 1981 crisis 1964 PBC 98G Leyland Atlantean PDR1A/1 / ECW (hired from Leicester CT 3-6/81) 1938 WHN 411G Bristol VRTSL6G / ECW (hired from Lincolnshire RCC 4/81) Double-deckers hired for trials and evaluation 500 TOJ 592S Metrobus DR101/2 / MCW (hired from MCW – famous five) 530 NHG 732P Leyland Titan B15 / Park Royal (hired from Leyland – famous five) Surviving SYPTE Support vehicles M51 DSA 987 AEC Matador Recovery (previously Salford City Transport)
  26. 1 point
    Hi sorry only just seen this It would have been around 68 to 70 .The leaders were a married couple who had a son a little older than myself I would have been 10 or so I can't recall the families name unfortunately
  27. 1 point
    Couldn’t tell you about the 60’s, but I was there (Junior school side) in the early 80’s. Head teacher was Mr. Wilson. Also remember Miss Carter, Miss Holmes, Mr. Berry (music), Mr. Powys, and Mr. Smith.
  28. 1 point
    According to Sharrow Cycling Club records Osbert Skinner's address in 1910 was "24 The Moor". Whilst Osbert beat J.G. Shaw's first 100 Sharrow record by 8 minutes a week after Shaw had set it up the future would be Shaw's. Perhaps it was his 1911 accident on Baslow hill that ended his cycling career? From 1911 racing success was in the hands of J.G. Shaw, J. Crookes and A.C. Baynes (Stainless Stephen). Shaw was to be hailed as "Sheffield's Greatest Long Distance Cyclist" by The Sheffield Telegraph. Shaw's 24 hour record would stand into the 1940's. In the Sharrow 1914 - 18 Roll of honour there may be a misprint because it records "G. Skinner Royal Flying Corps" From the above I assume it should be O. Skinner.
  29. 1 point
    Osbert was my great great uncle, though I never met him, but passed the shop on hundreds of occasions without knowing he was a relative. Osbert Skinner was born on 19th August 1885, and baptised 7th October at Highfield, the 5th and youngest son of Charles Skinner. In 1891 Osbert was living with his parents at 24 South Street Moor. He was a watchmaker by 1901, at South Street working for Charles. His older brother Arthur was a keen cyclist (he was financial secretary of the Upperthorpe Cycling Club in 1892) and passed on his enthusiasm to Osbert. In July 1893 the Independent published an advert selling a cycle: "Referee, Clincher pneumatic, splendid condition, balls throughout including head, very little used. Skinner, Jeweller, Sheffield moor" and in 1895: "Before buying machine call and see '95 pattern new patent detachable Brake: best value in Sheffield Skinner Jewellers, Sheffield moor". In 1907 Osbert rode an unpaced race from Sheffield to Bridlington gaining a gold medal in a time of 5h 16min. The book of 1908 says this was his first appearance in the medals. He also won a gold standard medal for 50 miles on the road in 2h 52min 12 secs. in 1907. In 1908 he set a district record of 189 3/4 miles for a 12 hour time trial, and a district record of 2h 35 for 50 miles. This would appear to make him the 1st winner of the "Sharrow 50". As well as these 2 gold medals he also won a gold watch for the best performance of the year and a gold chain for the 25 mile club handicap. The 25 mile handicap may still have been a track race at Bramhall Lane as mass start road racing was strictly taboo with the police at this time. In 1911 Osbert was an own account Watchmaker living at 54 St Marys Road with parents Charles and Ada. On Sunday 4th June 1911 Osbert lost control of his bicycle coming down Baslow Hill and stayed at the Wheat Sheaf Inn recovering for three days (see newspaper cutting. Whites Directory of 1911 shows him at 112 Ecclesall Road. Osbert married Antonie Ferdinandine Friedrichsen on 12th September 1912 at St Augustines. Antonie was born in German South America in 1888, the daughter of a widowed German Sausage Skin Dealer Ernst Friedrichsen, in 1911 living at 61 Ranby Road, Endcliffe, but at 20 Cowlishaw Road at the time of the marriage. Their son Ernest Osbert was born on 3rd February 1915, and he died aged 88 on 6th May 2003 at 23 Hoober Avenue (a jeweller). Osbert enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps on 9th February 1917. He was an Instrument Repairer and Wireless Mechanic with 101 Squadron, serving in France from January 1918. No 101 Squadron formed at Farnborough as part of the Royal Flying Corps on 12 July 1917 and was deployed to the Western Front in August as a night bombing unit equipped with F.E.2b aircraft. Its main task was to carry out night attacks on German railheads and airfields. The Squadron flew during the battles of 3rd Ypres in 1917, and throughout the 1918 German Spring offensives on the Somme before supporting the final allied attacks on the Hindenburg Line. Before his transfer to the R.A.F. from the R.F.C. his rank was A. Mech. 2, Trade:- Instr. Repairer, and once in the RAF Air Mechanic 3rd Class (Inst Repairer), His pay was 2s. 0d. Terms of Enlistment:- Duration of War . In March 1919 the squadron returned to the UK and it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The last known entry in the telephone book for Osberts Watchmaking business was 1978 - he was aged 93. His wife Antonie died on 8th February 1978 and Osbert died 3 weeks later on 5th March 1978, leaving £55,463 to his son Ernest, who was living at 112 Ecclesall Road. Ernest was still running the business in 1982 where he was photographed by Sheffield Newspapers, possibly on his retirement.
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    I remember the dancer he was called Mighty Melvin
  32. 1 point
    Searched where, and what I could MA, I have a tendency to go along with your suggestion of 'Smithfield'
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