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  1. Unitedite Returns

    Unitedite Returns

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      8

    • Content Count

      543


  2. Paolo Coopio

    Paolo Coopio

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      5

    • Content Count

      46


  3. Lysanderix

    Lysanderix

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      4

    • Content Count

      78


  4. Alastair

    Alastair

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      3

    • Content Count

      33


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 20/05/21 in all areas

  1. I took a wander around Bole Hill Quarry last week to have a look at the old railway and rock faces that have been left. Fascinating and eery place. Did you know that the stone from the quarry was used to build the Derwent and Howden Dams? It was lowered down to the railway at Grindleford via a steep incline railway and onwards to Bamford where it was then transported along another railway up to the dam building sites. https://youtu.be/qkoao3JjOLs
    2 points
  2. The largest congregation of Yellow Bins known. There are six visible in this postcard
    2 points
  3. Built at Gorton, in 1914, to works number 435, Class 04, No.63624, (Shed No. 41A, Darnall), stands near Tinsley South Junction Signal Box. The view is looking towards Tinsley West Junction, with the extensive Hadfield and Co. Ltd., East Hecla Works on the left hand side. Taken September 1960. Copyright Retained. The locomotive would appear to be standing roughly where Meadowhall South Tram Stop stands today, although I am sure that some of our more technically competent readers could nail the spot exactly.
    2 points
  4. Correct, I told our Arry the same following im failing is ier national.
    2 points
  5. I genuinely cannot believe as to just how much this bridge has deteriorated over the past 43 years. See below, dated, 16/06/1977. I seem to think that the track was lifted in 1973.
    1 point
  6. I know that No.63601, a long time Frodingham locomotive is fortunately preserved and it is still a very impressive locomotive, but I know exactly what you mean. That was the first clean Class 04, that I've ever seen!!! None of the Class 04's that I saw around Orgreave, Woodhouse, Beighton, Killamarsh ever looked like that.
    1 point
  7. Can't believe how much history there is on this 5 mile stretch. So many listed buildings and structures. 5 disused stations on its route (including former goods stations) And one of the most interesting things was the old abandoned engine shed near Tinsley. Inspection pit still there.
    1 point
  8. I published part 2 to this story last night. Focusing further up the Hope Valley at Bamford.
    1 point
  9. If it’s a success they may do the same with the current one. 😃
    1 point
  10. BRILLIANT!!! been waiting to hear if it was getting the go ahead. It will be an amazing transformation, and bring back to life an iconic Sheffield building that well deserves some TLC. With preservation of some of its past historical features, it will be ever so interesting to visit and see it all finished.
    1 point
  11. Missed one:- GCR032; Meadowgate Lane, Beighton, Holbrook Colliery Junction-Looking South towards Killamarsh. G.C.R. Formation to L.H.S. and Holbrook Colliery Formation to R.H.S.; 09/06/1977
    1 point
  12. There seem to be few images of the Holbrook Branch which connected Holbrook Colliery with the Great Central Railway at Beighton, although the two lines, which ran together for some distance actually diverged physically just beyond Meadowgate Lane, then on the outskirts of Beighton. Today, both the Great Central Railway formation and the Holbrook Branch formation have been almost completely filled in at Meadowgate Lane and it is difficult, even for those that knew it well, to actually follow these two alignments. However, I trust that the attached images might resurrect a few memories
    1 point
  13. In 1966, as a 15 year old schoolboy, I saw Bob Dylan play at the Gaumont. It was his infamous "Blonde on Blonde" tour where, in the second half of the show, he strapped on an electric guitar and brought out The Band much to the displeasure of many in the audience who continued to boo until the end of the show. It was an historic moment both for me and for rock 'n roll.
    1 point
  14. Fascinating, as always, and thanks for ploughing through the mud and making this video.
    1 point
  15. I wasdown there from 1959 til 1971 (ish),😏
    1 point
  16. For quite a few years I worked by the canal down at the start of the Tinsley locks. In winter we had Ice breakers ( nicknamed the Kista Dan after a then famous Antarctic ice breaker) keeping the canal open . Normal traffic was mainly a regular procession of barges taking ferro-alloys to the canal basin. I once organised a shipment of nearly 200 tonnes of steel , by barge, to the docks at Hull. It was never repeated. as the incredibly slow operation of loading and waiting for the tides(!!!) was too disruptive of our normal operations...and the "big boss" forbade it!!!
    1 point
  17. I was there last week but you missed me. I wanted to take the steam train to halt but you have to pay for a whole compartment at £40 due to covid restrictions.
    1 point
  18. fantastic video- thanks for sharing.
    1 point
  19. This was a great airport and could have made a difference for Sheffield had it been run properly. I flew a couple of times to Schiphol with work and then used it on the BA London run when the trains went on strike - excellent sausage sandwich! Better though were the flying schools. I got my private pilot's licence out of Sheffield and the landing approach from the M1 was great, the other a bit less fun with the tight turn over the car warehouse, the roof of which, interestingly was the place to land if engine failed on takeoff heading southwest. Very much missed.
    1 point
  20. We Sheffielders know a fing or two,,,,The word is pronounced... s x i p (h) o l....so the blessed aitch aint pronounced...which is why we are economical in how we spell fings. 😏
    1 point
  21. Muffin still alive and well. This was him yesterday 25 May. 10p a go
    1 point
  22. There have been several references to "Schipol". Isn't it "Schiphol"? It's not like Sheffielders to drop their aitches.
    1 point
  23. I flew on the very first flight out of the airport. I was working in Estonia at the time and I connected with my Estonian Airflight at Schipol Airport. I used the airport a lot whilst it was operational.
    1 point
  24. Thanks both of you....I have walked along some of the way in the past....with, I recall, a few scary looking drops along the way .I still wonder at the iron bridge on the way into Killamarsh.
    1 point
  25. I thought that I would share with you, the attached image, in order to give some impression of the passenger services operating in and out of Sheffield Midland Station, at the turn of the Twentieth Century. Copyright Retained. Captured around 1900, the image, taken from Woodseats Road Over-bridge, shows an unidentified Midland Railway Class 890, 2-4-0, tender locomotive hauling a West Bound (Up) Passenger Service, possibly destined for Chesterfield, Derby and beyond, or may be, possibly destined for Manchester, along the Hope Valley Line. The extensive terraced housing along Rydal Road, N
    1 point
  26. There seems to be a few threads related to this...but without going through them all...the chap at 32 Vickers Road was Harry Dennis Smith and his wife Elizabeth, they were at the same address in 1919. From what I can see he did not come to Sheffield until after 1915, there is a record of him ( or someone of the same name, age and profession) being a Member of the Eltham Palace Masonic Lodge in London in 1915, In the 1911 Census he is living along with wife Elizabeth ( nee Irons) and son Harry (b1893 Beeston, Nottingham) at 15 London Rd, Bedford. Elizabeth is Harry's second w
    1 point
  27. Remnants of Watery Lane. Inspection chamber covers along the course of Watery Lane on what is now The Ponderosa which survive as markers of where the street was originally laid. I recorded them in the following order walking east to west and estimate them to be situated near the following positions in comparison with the old streets that also existed at the time. 1 = Watery Lane/Adelphi St/Fountain Square 2 = Watery Lane /Adelphi St 3 = Watery Lane 4 = Watery Lane near the junction with Hammond St. Watery Lane originally existed as a track that ran from Port Mahon
    1 point
  28. That's correct. I spoke about it in a recent post as I went in there frequently with my grandma and also my mum. To the best of my knowledge, the fish market was more or less the same fish market which was in use until the castle market was shut down and demolished and the new Castle Market built in the late 50's was incorporated into the front of it. My Grandma used to buy me pie peas and chips in the same little cafe at the back of the fish market that was still there around the millenium year. It nay not have conformed to the most modern standards but the place had characte
    1 point
  29. Wedding of Fanny Pottinger and Bernard Bagshaw Batt at 41 Oak Hill Road, Nether Edge Date:1900 Photograph taken at 41, Oakhill Road. The bride and groom are Fanny Pottinger and Bernard Bagshaw Batt. Is this bride and groom any relation to you?
    1 point
  30. If Sheffield council ran York, all the medieval buildings would have gone long ago and tower blocks and other concrete monstrous buildings would have took their place.
    1 point
  31. Love these photos. Can't believe how much its changed. Interesting to see how different it looks with less vegetation. First pictures I've seen of the bridges before they were ruins too. Thanks very much for sharing these.
    1 point
  32. Thank you very much for posting your video. I really enjoyed watching the same. It’s a very long time indeed since I last visited the L. D &. E. C. R., and I am both, amazed and saddened by how much this long defunct line has changed so much in the past 40+ years. I have taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”. I hope that you can relate them back to the remains and locations shown in your video. LDE001-Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE003-Upperthorpe and Killamar
    1 point
  33. Hi I am Mike Anderson and was at Tapton from 1966 to 1971. I have attached a few photographs of my time there. More than happy for them to used.
    1 point
  34. That's my dad on the left, the bloke with the flat cap on 🙂
    1 point
  35. Smashing work of art! It highlights all the things me and my mates got up to in Bocking Woods (Chancet Wood) in the 50s. Climbing tree's, making dens, moulding touch burners out of clay from the river bank, making peashooters from the hollow stems of the Hogweed plant, drinking the spring water that trickled from an old cast iron pipe built into the hillside.
    1 point
  36. Both from Meersbrook Bank Methodist Chapel
    1 point
  37. Thought this photo of my mother in law might interest you.
    1 point
  38. How can we talk about inspectors without mention of Insp. Phillips ?! On coming off duty on the 82's / 88's ( 1960's ) at the top of Angel Street, the reasonable and accepted arrangement was for the next conductor to take the fares of passengers, usually quite a few, who had got on at the previous stop at the bottom of Snig Hill. This allowed for completing your waybill and putting the ticket machine away etc.between the two nearby stops so as not to cut into your break time, and so the arrangement was acceptable all round. However, it was often a case of.... 'Enter inspector Phillip
    1 point
  39. Over the years I bought records from Violet May from all 3 of her shops. I found her to be quite an individual character who had a great knowledge of the music she was selling. She could be awkward at times as she didnt suffer fools and had no time for timewasters. She would attend all the nusic concerts at the City Hall always looking her best, usually wearing a long dress and always smoking cigarette from a long cigarette holder. She was part of my education into Jazz music. RIP Violet `Bird still Lives` Happy Days! PopT
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. Thanks for the pic, I just tried to upload it but it said try later. I will. The piano - now there's a story. I don't think anyone would believe it without you being able to verify that the piano existed. It's a long one but I'll cut it as short as I can. Us who were in bands at the time had permission to use the music room at dinner time. This worked ok for a while until, as lads will do, we overstretched the mark a bit and the privilege was withdrawn. Undaunted we decided to use the bike sheds instead, which we did, but missed having the piano. Fred heard about a piano going fre
    1 point
  42. I was a Tram conductor in 1953 @ Tinsley Depot, moving to Tenter Street when Tinsley closed. I then applied to train as a Bus Conductor and eventually moved on to being a bus driver at Townhead Street (upstairs fron Tenter Street). Later on I was one of the first onemanners to work the Buxton/Manchester(48)/Bakewell (40)and Huddersfield(68) and was the first onemanner to test run the then new 'White Rose Express' service (X31..X32..X33) and then operated that for a number of years with the new high speed coaches. It became very very stressfull speeding up and down the M1 every day for a liv
    1 point
  43. I was in the lower 6th in 1971 and left in March 1972, as I thought I'd better go out an earn a living as I wasn't working very hard at my A Levels! I'm knealing up, 4th in from the right on the 2nd row. To my right I think is Barbara Smith, three to my left is Linda Mallinson and on the end, in the mini dress and looking rather coy, I think is Dorothy (surname escapes me for the moment). I remember Barbara Peck from your photo, though you were both obviously in the upper 6th and I was only in the 6th form for a couple of terms. Since I left I have hardly seen anyone I went to school with
    1 point
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