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  1. Vulcan fly past at RAF Norton airshow, year unknown.
    2 points
  2. I now have some pictures to share with anyone interested, from the Town Hall opening 1897 following George Edwin Waddington being invited to attend....
    1 point
  3. I read somewhere that being under weight was one cause…perhaps our diet was deficient although I also read that our wartime and post wartime diets were “heathy”.
    1 point
  4. Chanced upon this while google mapping and remembered the thread. Obviously newer plant than that described in OP and unlikely to be the site either but perhaps further indication of the usage of what was seen all those years ago. This site (near Meadowhall, to the north of Blackburn Meadows) was at one point a slag heap, later used as a dump and it appears the plant is active in an environmental control role. This kind of site - scarred landscapes handed back to nature which often seems reluctant to take them back - is not uncommon around South Yorks. Large areas to the north of Hackenthorpe and Beighton have looked quite similar in the recent past and had gas discharge warnings (perhaps still do). Further afield I can remember walking through parts of the Dearne valley which bore striking similarity. Fingers crossed that the bump will jog somebodies memory.
    1 point
  5. I can’t remember just when I last saw a lad with a scab on his knees, I suppose with short trousers being abandoned sometime in the fifties, knees were offered some protection from falling and grazing or cutting them by being shoved into long trousers plus the fact kids seem to have stopped the rough and tumble of playing on asphalt or concrete. Scabs were a very rare thing on the little girls as a result maybe because of the different types of play, lads scroming trees and walls and girls playing with dolls and prams. I can’t remember not having scabby knees and shins right up to when I got my first long trousers at the age of eleven or so but I do remember the pastime of picking scabs, lifting the hard crust and invariably causing more blood to flow, the times my mother berated me for picking my damaged knees, I’ve never had cut knees, shins or elbows since my step into adolescence by way of my first long trousers, today’s children are dressed as adults as soon as they gain the ability to crawl, lads don’t bare their knees until football catches their attention and in some respect the same happens to girls, school games warranted bare knees but nowadays the play areas have soft surfaces, our children are not made of delicate substances they bounce back, scraped knees grow back, I often catch a glance at my knees and I have to smile as I have the scars to remember falling and ultimately getting scabby knees, ah, they were the days.
    1 point
  6. Sixty years ago this week at the age of 15 I started my plumbing apprenticeship course at the recently opened College of Technology on Pond Street. my apprenticeship was to last for 6 years. Up to the age of 18 plumbing apprentice's attended one paid day release class and two unpaid evening classes per week, then from the age of 18 up to 21 it was three unpaid evening classes, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, catching the bus home, getting changed and back down town to attend these classes became a bit of a chore, especially if I'd been working on the other side of town. The Friday evening class was in the old College of Technology on Tudor Way, just behind the Lyceum Theatre, classes finished at 9-30, and as there were no facilities for making a drink, the plumbing lecturer would allow us to go, a couple at a time to the Adelphi Hotel on Tudor Way (now the location of the Crucible Theatre) for a half of Stones bitter, the back entrance from the College workshops came out on Tudor Place, (the road between the Lyceum Theatre and the Central Library) a short walk along, then across what was at the time a car park, and into the tap room of the Adelphi Hotel. First day at college was a bit of an eye-opener for a lad who didn't do too well at school! especially when the plumbing lecturer handed out log tables and informed us that the math's lesson was to be followed by geometry, So much for leaving school !!
    1 point
  7. I believe the local community group have got the sign from the box. Nigel L
    1 point
  8. I went to Pond Street College of Technology 1960 to 1966 doing ONC & HNC in Metallurgy. All was in Pond St one day & one night a week except when I had to do 3 nights a week in 1962/63 when one night was spent doing maths at an old building on Bank Street. Enjoyed most of my time doing the courses!
    1 point
  9. Still there. The Roman Room was on Orchard Street late 60s, but not sure if it was the same location?
    1 point
  10. There was also Mr. Kites on Division St. right up Dev’ Green end. Also a couple on ‘Eccy Road’. May have found myself in Henry’s a handful of times, as at one time was part of the bar crawl. Never went to Mr. Kites, nor the ones up Eccy Road, as found them too pretentious in the mid-80’s and often frequented by the 10/- millionaires of the parish! “£10 for a small glass of the latest must-drink vino”…… Emperors new clothes if you ask me. £10 a bottle is pushing the boat out for me these days….. 😆
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. Just looked the word Wallah up and a Wallah was a native or inhabitant of a specified place. "Bombay wallahs"
    1 point
  13. On the same theme, someone at work was always asked to be "char wallah", someone who made the tea.
    1 point
  14. Wallah is the correct spelling. It’s like the spelling of Verandah which I believe is the correct way but the letter H seems to have been discarded.
    1 point
  15. Hia Richard. Old maps indicate that " GATE " was the area up off Burnt Hill Lane, left of Hagg Stones. Ok
    1 point
  16. Another term my parents used was the word “ Punkah” a punkah was a large canvas sheet hung from the ceilings of homes of well to do Indians and English high ranking civil service personnel and the Tommy’s stationed there in the 1800s, it was pulled to and fro by an Indian man or child to give a little breeze to give a little relief from the heat, both my parents used the word in relation to the large ears on people, I suppose she picked it up from her own parents.
    1 point
  17. In 1960 I was fifteen and I was six foot tall, so really starting work in short trousers wasn’t really an option, looking back I’m amazed that my school friends and my play pals wore these short trousers all through and every winter, now they get togged up like they’re going to the South Pole , I had a summer coat and a winter coat, it was the same one, a two button fasting jacket but in winter I did turn my collar up and I was wearing my dads shoes when I was twelve, the only winter protection I had was wellingtons, that had R and L stencilled on them so you couldn’t wear them on the wrong feet, I do know that long trousers for schoolboys was forbidden by law during the war and I suppose the wearing of short trousers became the norm until times and fashions changed.
    1 point
  18. This afternoon. September 12th 2021
    1 point
  19. The Bell Hotel pub in Fitzalan Square, pictured between the Classic Cinema and the Sleep Shop in 1971 Notice also the yellow bin outside the cinema - Sheffield used to have loads of those!
    1 point
  20. I've just had a read the thread on SF. After looking at the maps they had I managed to find the remains of the street on google earth and if I'm right its just out the back of Macro's car park. Looking at the map you can see the triangular rail junction and the bridge just above the street and on the google earth shot the same points can be seen and what looks like a green strip of bushes which I think must have been the street its self. I would love to find a shot of the street itself for my friend as he seems to have such fond memories of the place.
    1 point
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