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  1. 5 points
    Hi all, so glad I found this site, so much history in one place. I was born at walkley in 65, moved to Bubwith rd Brightside where my mum was born and grandparents lived. From there we lived in a cottage in Roe Woods, my dad became one of the first 6 park patrollers, on motorbikes, in Sheffield while at Roe Wood. From there we moved to Shiregreen where mum still lives. Dad was born at the bottom end of Bellhouse rd. Have lived in a few places in Sheffield and now 20 years in Chesterfield. Looking forward to reading lots more and to dig up some of my own memories and photos to share with everyone. :-))
  2. 4 points
    Last year's thread and I rediscovered this 35mm slide which seems to fit appropriately into this one.Taken in June 1963 when rear loaders were favourite and steam locos much in evidence at Midland Station.
  3. 3 points
    Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12
  4. 2 points
    Hi Syrup Thank you for the news article clipping. It's very tantalising close apart from one minor detail the name in the article states G Lyon not J Lyon. However, the date and stables are spot on which leads me to believe Joseph Lyon worked at Sheffield Tramway Company. Joseph (27) married Emma(22) in 1869, the two witnesses are George (53) & Ann Lyon (55). His father is named Thomas so judging by the age gap George is probably Joseph's uncle. They come from a farming background in Lincolnshire so working together with horses makes sense. In 1883 George would have been aged 67 hence the article (oldest servant) makes it more probable that it was presented to George rather than Joseph, who was only 41 at that time. Joseph died (unknown) not long after aged just 44 and was buried at Heeley Christ Church on 2nd Jan 1887. So another connection to the article (he is now going to Heeley). I can only assume that the inscriber perhaps made an unlikely error with the initial on the trophy? I can't find a record of George & Ann having children hence the trophy must have been passed down to one of Joseph's two sons. I did find a very interesting post on this site on the STC and will make contact to see if any employee records still survive and hopefully will provide the proof that George & Joseph did work together. https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/154-sheffield-trams/ Again thanks for the clipping. John O.
  5. 2 points
    If my memory serves me well, it doesn't usually, I seem to remember that it was used as a stand for milk churns awaiting collection. I may possibly remember a fellow miscreant trying to get one of the lids off to quench a thirst but if pressed I would plead the UK version of the fifth amendment
  6. 2 points
    modern 'journalism' at its finest. Hide behind youtube and stir some s***. It brought the city together, made us very proud to be sheffielders and remembered the lads who paid the ultimate sacrifice. who plants the bedding plants and sweeps up from time to time is of little or no consequence. I dont see what youre trying to achieve by posting it to be honest.
  7. 2 points
    Anyone living in any of these houses may be interested in this postcard on Ebay. ------------------- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173604248815?ul_noapp=true Google Street View -------https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.3837307,-1.4973794,3a,75y,81.23h,90.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s24w0G3NbxJMMlYOd7eyZgw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en
  8. 2 points
    Probably of no interest to anyone else, but one of the photos here shows the location of my Dad’s bench, sited and dedicated to his memory for almost twenty years now...
  9. 1 point
    According to the writing under the picture it was Harold Lambert as the Lord Mayor and picture taken in 1966. The double door at the bottom when opened revealed a very small dance hall. We used to have a trio play music for the dancing after the speeches and prize presentation.
  10. 1 point
    Mr Daniel Doncasters Will. ( The Scarborough item is not related ) Sheffield Daily Telegraph 25 January 1913
  11. 1 point
    Hi boginspro, went to investigate the area of the well & pump for you. Re your 2nd photo:- just over the short bit of wall, a few feet down the pathway, among the grass & weeds, are 2 tall black pipes. One has a top on it, that is obviously to screw off to inspect something. Standing at that point with a copy of old photo in-hand, I think it could have been the location. I have left it with my friend up there, to try and get more info from the residents for you.
  12. 1 point
    Here are the old houses that were behind that trough, Unfortunately it is not a very wide view, I think this photo' was taken in the late 60's or early 70's. The houses and the well that fed that trough are shown on 1850's maps standing all on their own, no other houses on the road.
  13. 1 point
    talking of Paternoster Row/Brown St, there was another slight exposure further along, almost outside spearmint rhino, you can see it got in the way of the new pavement...
  14. 1 point
    Hello is I was trawling through Ebay’s scissors looking for a scissorsmith when I saw the scissors shown below. I was intrigued and I had to have a bid, all be it, ultimately unsuccessfully. I felt I must post a photo, as these grape scissors are certainly “Sheffield”. These mixed metal scissors are easy to date using the date letter associated with the hallmark on the silver finger holes. The unembellished letter “o” without a Monarch’s head, together with the crown (for Sheffield) indicates the assay at the Sheffield Assay Office in 1931. The maker of the silver part of the scissors is indicated by the “S.H.&Co.” but I will reference that later. We can see from the rear pivot area of the scissors that the blades are made of Sheffield England stainless steel and from the pivot front we a clear pictorial probable trademark with lettering below it. The “nest” with eggs in was the trademark of Sheffield’s Southern & Richardson and I think you will be able to “fill in the spaces” to confirm that makers name. These cutlery makers were known at the “Don Cutlery Works” from the middle of the 19th century and there are several images of knives spread around the forum. One of these did suggest the trademark was a “thistle” or has this been a mis-interpretation of the image on a much older and tarnished knife compared to these 20th century scissors. From a reference I think I read on line, technically, the grape scissors may not have been made by “Southern & Richardson” as in the 1920s that named company had been incorporated into a larger Sheffield concern and the latter continued with the trademarks. Hopefully the “forum” can clear this up. Returning to the “S.H.&Co.” maker’s mark now. The website www.silvermakersmarks.co.uk that I always confidently use for identifying British silversmiths, identifies the silver finger parts as having been made “probably, by Sydney Hall & Co”, and gives them an address of “Birmingham”. If there is other information regarding the maker please enlighten us, as there will be would be many interested to know. I hope there are others on the forum, like me, who like and wish they owned the grape scissors. Kalfred
  15. 1 point
    This is a very interesting topic SteveHB , hopefully members will add to it and it may take off like the drain spotting one did. I do remember a few wells and troughs but have no pictures of them so can I add, please, a couple from Picture Sheffield of two on Wharncliffe Craggs, a place on which I spent many an happy hour before I left Sheffield. The Dragon's Well and Wharncliffe Rock Water Troughs . http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s04193&pos=94&action=zoom&id=7711 http://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s04204&pos=1&action=zoom&id=7722
  16. 1 point
    Fulwood Termius, Canterbury Ave 501 looks brand new in this shot so I’m guessing that means it was taken in the late 40’s.
  17. 1 point
    Hello no spoons for me again today. Not all bad though. What do you think? The blades on these scissors are about 3 inches long. We see the "I.XL" mark clearly. On the the other side of the blade pivot area is a less clear mark that I believe says that the scissors are chromium plated.I supose dating the scissors is difficult, but they may well be from the same period as "SteveHB's" Kelly directories ad. Kalfred
  18. 1 point
    Circa 1890 map. https://www.old-maps.co.uk/index.html#/Map/435973/387740/13/100453
  19. 1 point
    Look and see what's on the far back wall, a violin, their trademark as large as life.
  20. 1 point
    Thanks for posting this, I've been aware myself of some of the 'differences' in Tony's memory of the event and of those who feel their noses have been put out of joint through all this. It's useful to have them brought together. I'm not a supporter of an honour from the Queen either and I suspect there will be the expected outcry when he doesn't, but the reasons you catalogue will be the reasons the Palace, or whoever, decide not to include him I suspect. I too enjoyed the fly past, who doesn't, and it was a great day for Sheffield. I'm concerned however that it had more to do with 'great' telly than anything else, along with BBC Breakfasts battle with ITVs alternative. There's no hiding the one-upmanship between Dan and Piers. A journalist bumps into an old man tending to a memorial with a great personal back story and bingo !!! No need to check it out. At some point people will start to get fed up with all this and the one to suffer will be Tony. It's what society likes to do for some reason - build someone up then knock them down? And where will the BBC be. You say in your report that Tony hasn't benefitted from any of this - well in many ways he has, it's quite painful to see some organisations fall over backwards to be seen to support him on the back of the BBC publicity - free pleasure flight, Upgrades to 1st class, Stars etc.... And I now hear that he's telling everyone the memorial is 'HIS' ???? and that he's upsetting certain members of the military by planting yellow flowers around it - I know I didn't think that was a problem myself until it was pointed out it's a symbol of cowardice in such circles. And please don't start me on that flag pole... the entrance to Butlins springs to mind.
  21. 1 point
    This country used to equip the railways of the world. My first machine commissioning job in Asia was in South Korea. One of the British men stopping in my hotel was overseeing the assembly of 200 underground trains exported from GEC Manchester. The new trains were to improve the Seoul underground ready for the Seoul Olympics. Having thrown our industry away we have to import trains now.
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    Fascinating reading. I had read other articles about the Charfield crash but not these. My grandfather was apparently a ladies' man and I suspect that his failing to give his proper name was for such reasons. I like the fact that in the above article, he is referred to as a young man when he was 46 at the time.
  26. 1 point
    Edmunds George, beerhouse, 61 Grimesthorpe road, bottom corner of Danville Street opposite Tea Gardens hotel = Danville Inn / Hotel Ward Willie Leon, beerhouse, 62 Grimesthorpe road top corner Buckenham Road. = Buckenham or Buck Inn / Hotel Norton Simeon, beer house, 123 Grimesthorpe road top corner of Earldom Road. = Normanton Arms And this map possibly shows a public house on the opposite corner of Earldom road to number 123. = 152 Grimesthorpe Road, beer-off licence only, transferred in 1926 from Albert Roper to Edward Conroy. (photo on Picture Sheffield, in 1970, corner of Earldom Road, when it was the premises of Sydney Green, money lender)
  27. 1 point
    The Green Man was a Public House (Bar) and ‘held the licence’ means he was the publican or landlord. 1890 map of the area with The Green Man ⭕️
  28. 1 point
    From 1893 to 1895 Jarvis Milner held the licence of the Green Man at No 23 Broad Street.
  29. 1 point
    Thanks for posting that - though it appears to refer to a covered driveway where the carriages and horses can wait, rather than the cabmen's rest room shown in the photo.
  30. 1 point
    Here is the 1901 Census for William Henry - he was at the Beeches childrens home on Barnsley Road: Here's a 1905 map showing the Beeches: and part of one from 1890: Here's the Beeches (in the trees) from an aerial photograph taken in 1935: Link to information about the Beeches (Lyn may well have additional knowledge about the Beeches): The Beeches was occupied by Thomas Collinson (Assistant Overseer and Collector of Poor Rates for Brightside, also Clerk of the Burial Board) and family until his death in January 1897, when the Guardians of the Poor attempted to rent it out. It later became (amongst other things) a nurses' home for the City General Hospital. The Southampton was moored on the River Humber at Hull - link here: http://www.childrenshomes.org.uk/TSSouthampton/
  31. 1 point
    I know that feeling, we were twice split up from friends and neighbours when they pulled our houses down in the area. It would have been great had they considered more renovation / modernisation instead of demolition for this and many other parts of Sheffield.
  32. 1 point
    Recognise any of this scene?
  33. 1 point
    Lets try and get it sorted out. The main pictures are of Woodbourne Hotel who played in the Attercliffe Alliance League. There are 2 sets of medals on display - being runners up in the Attercliffe Alliance Charity Cup and the runners up of Division "B" of the Attercliffe Alliance League in season 1920/21. The picture obviously was taken outside the pub as can be seen by the sign on the right-hand side of the pub. There was a Woodbourne Road WR (Wesleyan Reform) team that played in the Bible Class League. To play in the Bible Class League, the team had to be connected to a Church or Church youth club. Pub teams, like Woodbourne Hotel, were not allowed in the Bible Class League. The Attercliffe Alliance league started in 1917/18 season as the Fowler League (Named after the person that started it) For season 1918/19 it changed its name to the Attercliffe Alliance League, before dissolving at the end of the 1922/23 season. The Attercliffe Charity Cup started in season 1917/18. At the end of the War, it was a prime time for the setting up of Charity Cup Competitions with the Darnell Medical Aid and Tinsley Charity Cup being two other local competitions that started that same season. The Alliance Charity Cup ran until 1940/41. Like so many other Football competition, the loss of players to the war effort saw the end of the Competition. It would be nice to know if the cups played for in the Attercliffe competitions are still around somewhere.
  34. 1 point
    We found these photos in my grandmothers old photos whilst researching the family tree. The first one is 1920-1 the others are earlier . We have no idea which football team it is (they seem very well dressed for a pub team in those days) or who the people in the photo are. Any help would be very much appreciated Thank you Tania
  35. 1 point
    No, I just did a lot of "suet" in the 60s&70s. I spent my career at Sheffield's "premier" depot north of the city. W/E.
  36. 1 point
    It may be just me, my eyes are not what they were, but on some posts/comments I struggle to read them without zooming the page. I just wondered if the default font size could be increased slightly, I understand that this can be done using the size button when posting or editing but members with good eye sight will not think of doing so.
  37. 1 point
    Well done RLongden! Found this (Ecclesall Corn Miller's House) https://friendsofmillhousespark.org/corn-mill-project/the-mill-story-part-14/ interesting history.
  38. 1 point
  39. 1 point
    Reading some background info on Birley East Colliery, I suddenly made the connection with this thread! Funny how threads and stories criss-cross on this site? Still a grest read is this book and a 3 hour flight passed by quickly
  40. 1 point
    I knew the area in the 50' and 60's but can't remember that being there (doesn't mean it wasn't mind) even though it was at the top of High House Road which now seems to have vanished.,. I have so far failed to find an early picture but the Picture Sheffield image below shows the building to the right of it with the archway was still there in 1979. Both are shown on the maps of 1905 and 1950's. The drain cover can still be seen on the modern Google image, I wonder if it was cut down to that castellated building when the building with the archway was demolished.
  41. 1 point
    Volume One of the book Ribble by T. B. Maud contains the following ".... in July 1973 it was agreed that Ribble would take over the 'local' express services between Manchester and Bradford (X12) , Barnsley (X19) Sheffield (X48) and Mansfield" Although no specific date is given by implication some time during the month of July is presumed as when Ribble replaced North Western Road Car..
  42. 1 point
    These were certainly a feature of my early days in Sheffield. The bubble gum machines in particular! I have rescued a few over the years, one for bubble gum, one which gave out Kit Kats (best not used on a hot day), and a couple of old cigarette machines which I found in the Orchard Square when they were pulling it apart for redevelopment. Hard to imagine how a tin box full of fags could survive on a wall these days. I did take some snaps recently as they've been in my garage for years. See what you think!
  43. 1 point
    Was down at Crich last week. 510 was being moved late in the afternoon and is looking very smart.
  44. 1 point
    Osbert was my great great uncle, though I never met him, but passed the shop on hundreds of occasions without knowing he was a relative. Osbert Skinner was born on 19th August 1885, and baptised 7th October at Highfield, the 5th and youngest son of Charles Skinner. In 1891 Osbert was living with his parents at 24 South Street Moor. He was a watchmaker by 1901, at South Street working for Charles. His older brother Arthur was a keen cyclist (he was financial secretary of the Upperthorpe Cycling Club in 1892) and passed on his enthusiasm to Osbert. In July 1893 the Independent published an advert selling a cycle: "Referee, Clincher pneumatic, splendid condition, balls throughout including head, very little used. Skinner, Jeweller, Sheffield moor" and in 1895: "Before buying machine call and see '95 pattern new patent detachable Brake: best value in Sheffield Skinner Jewellers, Sheffield moor". In 1907 Osbert rode an unpaced race from Sheffield to Bridlington gaining a gold medal in a time of 5h 16min. The book of 1908 says this was his first appearance in the medals. He also won a gold standard medal for 50 miles on the road in 2h 52min 12 secs. in 1907. In 1908 he set a district record of 189 3/4 miles for a 12 hour time trial, and a district record of 2h 35 for 50 miles. This would appear to make him the 1st winner of the "Sharrow 50". As well as these 2 gold medals he also won a gold watch for the best performance of the year and a gold chain for the 25 mile club handicap. The 25 mile handicap may still have been a track race at Bramhall Lane as mass start road racing was strictly taboo with the police at this time. In 1911 Osbert was an own account Watchmaker living at 54 St Marys Road with parents Charles and Ada. On Sunday 4th June 1911 Osbert lost control of his bicycle coming down Baslow Hill and stayed at the Wheat Sheaf Inn recovering for three days (see newspaper cutting. Whites Directory of 1911 shows him at 112 Ecclesall Road. Osbert married Antonie Ferdinandine Friedrichsen on 12th September 1912 at St Augustines. Antonie was born in German South America in 1888, the daughter of a widowed German Sausage Skin Dealer Ernst Friedrichsen, in 1911 living at 61 Ranby Road, Endcliffe, but at 20 Cowlishaw Road at the time of the marriage. Their son Ernest Osbert was born on 3rd February 1915, and he died aged 88 on 6th May 2003 at 23 Hoober Avenue (a jeweller). Osbert enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps on 9th February 1917. He was an Instrument Repairer and Wireless Mechanic with 101 Squadron, serving in France from January 1918. No 101 Squadron formed at Farnborough as part of the Royal Flying Corps on 12 July 1917 and was deployed to the Western Front in August as a night bombing unit equipped with F.E.2b aircraft. Its main task was to carry out night attacks on German railheads and airfields. The Squadron flew during the battles of 3rd Ypres in 1917, and throughout the 1918 German Spring offensives on the Somme before supporting the final allied attacks on the Hindenburg Line. Before his transfer to the R.A.F. from the R.F.C. his rank was A. Mech. 2, Trade:- Instr. Repairer, and once in the RAF Air Mechanic 3rd Class (Inst Repairer), His pay was 2s. 0d. Terms of Enlistment:- Duration of War . In March 1919 the squadron returned to the UK and it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The last known entry in the telephone book for Osberts Watchmaking business was 1978 - he was aged 93. His wife Antonie died on 8th February 1978 and Osbert died 3 weeks later on 5th March 1978, leaving £55,463 to his son Ernest, who was living at 112 Ecclesall Road. Ernest was still running the business in 1982 where he was photographed by Sheffield Newspapers, possibly on his retirement.
  45. 1 point
    Yes .i think it is .sorry for the very late reply.i have just recently brought 2 more Richard knives which are only 50-60.mm in length.both are of the same design but I believe the s/s version is newer than the other.single blade and what appears to be a pen . The false M.O.P. knife has a pen in it if that's what it is.the S/S version unscrews whilst the M.O.P.one doesn't. So.my question is what is it supposed to be pen or scribe.?.thanks for looking.
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    This book will be posted over the next posts
  48. 1 point
    Firth Park and its Surroundings Bell Houses demolished c 1925 - I am currently researching local history and collecting material with a view to writing a book about the Firth Park area and its surroundings. Firth Park did not exist before the opening of the actual park in 1875 and was totally rural. Since then the whole area around has changed rapidly over the years, more so in the last 40 or 50 years. If you any information, photographs, memories or stories you would be willing to share with me about the past, please get in touch. This can be about school, work, play, church, the way we lived, housing, the people we knew or simply some story or memory handed down. Photographs can be copied by myself and returned to the owner if required. The main area of coverage will be Firth Park, Page Hall, Fir Vale up towards Firs Hill, Longley, Sheffield Lane Top, up towards the Flower Estate though anything of particular interest just outside these areas may be included. If there isn't sufficient material for a book then everything collected will be deposited in the Local Studies Library in Sheffield so it isn't 'lost'. Thanks
  49. 1 point
    Hello and a very warm welcome to Sheffield History. Before I continue let me first say that this site is free to use, will always be free to use and you will never be charged a penny to use it - either now or in the future - I feel it's important that websites don't charge visitors and so sheffieldhistory will always cost you absolutely nothing. Everyone has memories - and they are even better when they are shared ! This site was born on February 11th 2007 - after we found ourselves remembering more and more of the things that used to stick out in our minds about Sheffield that just weren't around anymore. We spent time looking them up on the internet and feel that there should be more Sheffield history and memories out there on the net. Sheffield's city, culture and people are fascinating and the history of the city has moulded all that. Here on the site we celebrate everything about our great city and it's history, along with the people that made it what it is. "Whatever happened to....." In the various sections you will find everything from old nightclubs and pubs, people, celebrities, music, the football, and of course your chance to look up all the people you may have not been in touch with for years and years ! Most of my memories are from the 70's and 80's but we need people of all ages to get posting their memories The site is fun, friendly and completely free of charge to use and all we ask is that you contribute your memories or help us out with our research by posting information that you might know in one of the threads ! *NOTE - AS A GUEST YOU CAN READ THE SITE BUT WILL NEED TO REGISTER AN ACCOUNT TO POST OR SEE THE PICTURES THAT ARE POSTED ON THE SITE (it's free and takes 30 seconds !)* To register click here - http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/i...Reg&CODE=00 CLICK HERE TO CONTACT THE ADMIN TEAM
  50. 0 points
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