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    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


    • Points

      10

    • Content Count

      6,943


  2. paulhib48

    paulhib48

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      9

    • Content Count

      47


  3. DaveJC

    DaveJC

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      7

    • Content Count

      33


  4. RichardS

    RichardS

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      7

    • Content Count

      549


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/01/21 in all areas

  1. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were th
    2 points
  2. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  3. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    2 points
  4. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  5. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  6. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  7. Yes, Looking across High Street towards Change Alley !
    1 point
  8. This set is around the end of Sheffield Road and Shepcote Lane, with some photos taken from top deck of Tinsley viaduct. 3rd one down is the transport cafe, next door to the Plumpers, now American Golf. If you look on Google maps aerial view, you can still see the ‘CAFE’ letters painted on the roof.
    1 point
  9. Yes that’s where it was. Like it was never there!
    1 point
  10. Thankyou History Team, what BRILLIANT photos, they really capture the feeling of the era. Regards Heartshome
    1 point
  11. Had a walk in attercliffe earlier and took these photos with comparisons
    1 point
  12. Castle Market from 1965 - remember this?
    1 point
  13. Extremely hard one to choose. Loved Sheaf and Castle Market. But one place stands to mind is a second hand shop on Infirmary Road which I loved going to.
    1 point
  14. Old Maps did reply! They asked for the postcode! I gave them plenty of details when I first sent the request. It doesn't take to much effort to find Sheffield and then select the 1967 large scale map to soon see the blank sections! And it's the case that's it's not loading in, because you can see the watermarking of "old maps" on the white sections.
    1 point
  15. did me when i first saw them. brings back memories of being sat outside halfords as a kid in the 90s in my dads Peugeot 309. back and forth getting alsorts of parts because it was running like a bag of spanners 😄
    1 point
  16. The downstairs part of Sheaf House accessed by the yard round the back was occupied by WH Smith Wholesale. They supplied most of the newsagents in Sheffield with newspapers and mags from there in the 60s/70s and maybe later. They also had a showroom where you could buy toys and stationery etc The postal address was : Sheaf House , Sheaf Street
    1 point
  17. across from Halfords was Somerfields supermarket. and next to it was a discount clothing store called SR Gents if i remember correctly. here are some images i found a while back off a facebook group. i cannot remember the person who uploaded these images. so if the person is on here, i do apologise for posting these and if you wish for me to remove them, then i will do so. and here is a bonus, a pic of the old superbowl/jungle jims next to halfords.
    1 point
  18. It definitely was. Did my YTS there in 1987 and remember the bell in the lobby area...
    1 point
  19. Up hill and round the front between Corporation St. and Steelhouse Lane.
    1 point
  20. Hi guys, I wondered if anyone on here might be able to help with something (or know someone who can). I’m producing a documentary about John Burkhill aka the green pram man. In his interview he mentions that his wife had being diagnosed with cancer in 1992 and her final wish was to do the marathon and win a finishers medal, as she had never won anything before. John contacted the race organisers and got permission. He said that when they walked into the stadium, it was almost as though they’d won it. Everyone was cheering them on and he said his wife was the happiest he’d ever seen h
    1 point
  21. The result of the above in comparison to: Obviously Google Earth as a few limitations with angles and clarity —plus differences from things like focal-length of cameras, etc, but I think it ends up pretty close so Hallam Tower is definitely a viable candidate and I'm pretty convinced the photo was taken from there.
    1 point
  22. They appeared to have a very succesful fire engine breeding programme running on that patch of ground a few years ago.
    1 point
  23. Can confirm. Below, from a photo of 2019 of the area where they were, shows some of those yellow & black brick structures as seen in the last screenshot (with metalwork removed).
    1 point
  24. I think that may be a matter of semantics. I don't remember ever going in the Lescar, or coming out, through the "front" facing Sharrow Vale Road. The entrance from Lescar Lane could reasonably be called the front, in which case you are viewing the back and side. Instinctively I'd have placed Hallam Tower rather more easterly than it was (in relation to the viewed area) and might have expected to see the "front" of the Lescar to Lescar Lane from there. Perhaps this is similar to the perception makapaka had.
    1 point
  25. 1st on the old Rockingham Close, just off Rockingham Street (where Primark now stands): https://www.google.com/maps/@53.376801,-1.4738505,3a,75y,36.49h,81.31t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sHcjTTm0wGjZkHVqDGv_KjA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656 2nd, the other end of Rockingham Close (between China Red/the old Plug Box Office, looking at where Primark now stands): https://www.google.com/maps/@53.3765985,-1.473929,3a,37.5y,29.36h,91.42t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1siBFStLe0xdjt3DKvYbnMPQ!2e0!5s20120601T000000!7i13312!8i6656 I believe the other two are in the same area (the old Rockingham Close/now Primark —
    1 point
  26. I would say the shots were almost certainly taken from above the Ski Village site (around the Parkwood Springs viewing platform, Mountain Bike track area).
    1 point
  27. I was told many years ago that the original Change Alley was where the money changers did their business, they were mainly Jewish and not allowed to ply their trade within the walls of Sheffield Castle. I’ve no evidence to support this but thought it worth posting.
    1 point
  28. I’d sort of worked out it must be between very late 60s and late 70s and Edmunds photos verify that. I notice on the last pic that the building was Seashells cafe at the time
    1 point
  29. We watched the full monty last bit and Realised this is a still from the film!
    1 point
  30. Yes. Remember the Slammer in the 70s . I had friends who worked at the Town Hall and it was considered a cool, trendy place to dine Attercliffe style. Very basic menu and limited choice served in large white bowls, I think. It was very unlike the Vesta Beef Curry I’d been buying as a curry connoisseur a few weeks previously.
    1 point
  31. The guy who ran the train set up was confined to a wheelchair as I recall, the kids absolutely loved him, he was a real star, great memories.
    1 point
  32. Birch Road traced a straight route northwesterly from Stevenson Road to Faraday Road and the original Crown sat at the eastern junction (of Birch & Faraday). Though the north-western end was enclosed by the works expansion noted above, and subsequent. Birch Road's earlier, full course remains evident in later maps. Bessemer Road coexisted with Birch Road whilst the latter was at its full extent (as the article you quote from suggests). As an educated guess I'd say the bulk of both roads sprang up through the early to mid 1870s. The death of Hopkinson at the premises would rather indic
    1 point
  33. I managed to sneak onto the station in the late 1970 via the cattle dock bay and used the white steps to get onto the platform. We had to sneak pass the signal box when the guy wasn't looking. It was bit more intact at that point too. It always fascinated me even to this day. I suppose it was due to the fact that it was very different to Midland Station. Being raised above ground and having the electric overhead wires running through it. The style of the buildings was different to the Midland and for someone interested in train spotting there was the possibility of seeing locos that didn't go
    1 point
  34. Must say in my life time it's always looked much the same ,from the exterior that is. Much demolition/dismantling was done in the past with materials being reused for new construction in the area.
    1 point
  35. Andrew's was, perhaps, the only place in our City where one could buy many of the books used at school. Yes, Lyn, another wonder of our childhood which provided us withe means to do things without the "benefit" of electronics and technology. The Methodist Bookshop was another place where "bookworms" could indulge themselves before going into Cann's.
    1 point
  36. Lived at No.7, which is the house to the left of the gennel at the side of the van. That is in fact my dads old van. Spent many a Sunday off to Brid and Skeggy in that. Dare say the kids playing on the pavement are me and my brothers, I must have been about 5 when that was taken. Behind the camerashot, in the the right hand corner, was a scrap yard. Halfway down the road,on the right hand side was the rag and bone mans house. To the bottom of the road, fronting Broughton Lane, was the corner shop.
    1 point
  37. When I first joined this brilliant forum it was just a new thing to me and I suppose it was for the other members too, but over time the forum has developed and come of age, the appearance and general lay out is very good, I especially love the old Sheffield coat of arms, a bit of colour in these dark times does bring some comfort to my old heart.
    1 point
  38. I see two women, in the middle of the road, dodging the low-flying reindeer. More numerous than seagulls on Bridlington sea-front they were. In those days, you used to get whole flocks of them, (women shoppers and reindeer), around Sheffield City Centre at that time of year. You don't tend to see so many of either these days. Jute coal-sacks - blooming awful things to carry when soaking wet, even more so when you had a lot of slack in the coal.
    1 point
  39. I remember it well, it was twentyfive to three on a wet January day! I'd just parked my mk10 jaguar at the top of King Street. The Christmas lights are still up. The bus shelter must be leaking cos the woman at the front of the queue still has her brolly up. Either that or the wind's whipping up Angel Street and blowing into the shelter and spoiling her hairdo! The coal man with the Thames Trader has finished for the day. Walsh's is still Walsh's. :-)
    1 point
  40. According to the technical info released with the movie the locations given are:- Burbage Rocks, Derbyshire, England. Gleadless Valley, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Heavygate Road, Crookes, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Millstone Edge, Derbyshire, England. The Vine Pub, Cemetary Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Thorpe Marsh Power Station, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. Plus a couple more I noticed Tinsley cooling towers(RIP) Fox & Duck, Sheffield Road Tinsley The Country and Western nigh
    1 point
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