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  1. Wow Syrup thank you
    2 points
  2. 1955 apparently. Elliott, that's it, thanks.
    1 point
  3. That really is amazing, thank you! I could spend hours looking at these, very kind of you
    1 point
  4. Yes, quite common amongst the locals. I wonder if the salt in the air made the winds seem worse, we rarely got snow on the sea front, generally it started about half a mile inland or once the roads had a bend or two, just past us when I cycled in to work. Mentioning the salt, Dad's car after a few years needed serious corrosion attention on one side only, our road ran directly from the coast and so Dad always parked broadside on in the drive.
    1 point
  5. I came across this in Whitley Bay. When the Nor'easterlies set in there during winter the winds were coming straight from the arctic, and boy did you feel it along the sea front! I've never felt winds like them "down south", or inland for that matter; they weren't that strong, just biting cold.
    1 point
  6. No….was due to go in 2020….but the lockdown prevented it and we lost our deposit. Can’t say I was over thrilled by the hotels attitude.🤨
    1 point
  7. I never attended Sharrow Lane, but my cousin who was born in 1947 did. I believe that all her A Stream class passed the 11+ and half the B Stream in her final year at Junior School. It was a shame that I didn't has it certainly had better academic results than Shirecliffe which was a more modern school and also no longer exists!
    1 point
  8. I have never come across the expression…bit I like it!
    1 point
  9. Census Records available for Harmer Lane.
    1 point
  10. Walking along Pinstone Street yesterday, past where they have all the scaffolding up, and noticed the remnants of the old signage for the shop at the end. What did this used to be in the past?? Burtons perhaps?? Ive added a couple of photos for its location, the angle of the actual sign as it is now isn’t the best im afraid. Thanks
    1 point
  11. I keep wondering why some contributors spend so much time on the History Forum when it's clear that they don't like old Sheffield and seem to love all the latest modernisation. I find modern Sheffield a lifeless city centre and nothing like the bustling place that I used to love.
    1 point
  12. At the time of my birth, Dad was in the RAMC and saw me for the first time after WW2 had ended. We lived with my grandparents at the time with their back yard and big sliding green gate facing Sharrow Lane and I believe the Kays lived next door. At the other side of No. 3 on the Pegg's side, the Pexton family lived in the first house on Priory Road and it was their daughter who asked for a Green On. In 1952 when both my grandparents had died the tenancy passed on to my Aunt and Uncle whose surname was Ellis. In the bad Winter of 1947 our family moved to a new Prefab in Shirecliffe where we lived for almost 12 years.
    1 point
  13. I was born in Priory Terrace in 1943 and remember the Pegg's in that corner shop. A neighbour sent his young daughter in to pick up a Green Un and she politely asked Mr Pegg for a Green One please . Also recall a BeerOff on the opposite corner of Sharrow Lane run by the Morton's and Nolkes the Barber further down where I remember having my haircut for 1/- as a youngster.
    1 point
  14. This is my Mum in Bromley Street, in the late 50's/early 60's
    1 point
  15. I haven't seen a picture of the area built up to this extent. My Grandma was a Binney and said a relative ran a fish shop on either Pond Street or Harmer Lane.
    1 point
  16. Don't know if anybody is interested but here's the view from the top of the Five Arches down Herries Road towards the Wednesday ground.
    1 point
  17. The Brooke Bond PG Tips picture cards. We have the full book of The Saga of Ships. You tended to get loads of the same cards and often never got the full set before thy started another series. I have an inlay card that shows what you could get. I also remember Walls Sausages doing a set of 3D pictures of dinosaurs. We had a lot of sausages when that was on. Mum was in trouble if she brought the wrong make of sausages
    1 point
  18. The will of this man was written in 1761 and proved in 1767. It suggests that he was of some wealth with investments in Worrall, Sheffield Park, Storrs Bridge, Bradfield and Middlewood. The list is worth itemising with one item in particular benefitting from further scrutiny. · Revenue at Middlewood · Estate at Worrall (messuages, lands and tenements) · Part of Cutlers’ Wheel at Storsbridge · Farm at Bradfield (tenant right) · Dwelling houses, lands and tenements in Sheffield · Farm in Sheffield Park The Cutler’s Wheel at Storrs Bridge appears in lease transactions in the records of the lands held by the Duke of Norfolk. They are detailed in a PhD thesis submitted by Julia Hatfield in 2002[1] and draw upon documents held at Sheffield Archives. The first from March 24th 1719-20 provides the following details[2]. Jonathan Sanderson, a tailor of Bradfield, and Enoch Drabble, a cutler of Langhouse, took a lease of Norfolk land in 1719-20 to 'take a convenient place upon the River Loxley in or about the place called Stubbin Pit being about a quarter of a mile above Loxley Wheele now in the occupation of Christopher Broomhead and William Ibbotson for the building of a new wheel with one or two ends and as many troughs as they shall think fitting.’ A second transaction followed on 20th March 1741-2[3] when the wheel was let to Jonathan Sanderson, a grocer of Bradfield, and Enoch Drabble, a cutler of Brookside in Bradfield; it consisted of two ends and eight troughs. Hatfield has the lessees of 1741 as the sons of the original two men. That cannot be so, at least in the case of Jonathan Sanderson. Although the occupations are different and the signatures also differ, neither point need be crucial, especially with twenty years between the two leases. A further transaction is evident for Jonathan. Listed as a shopkeeper of Bradfield, he took a lease on a garden at a yearly rent of 3s on 25th March 1745[4]. His signature here is similar to that from 1741-2. Critical, however, is the information about a son, of whom see below. The testator of 1767 mentions three daughters, one of whom has the unusual name Tamar. That allows for her to be identified as the girl baptised at Bradfield on 22nd June 1721 who married Thomas Hattersley at Silkstone by licence. They married on 20th September 1740. Jonathan’s wife was named as Sarah and the other daughters were Anne Hobson (entitled daughter-in-law) and Martha Furnace. Tamar’s baptism date would suggest that Jonathan had married Sara Parkin at Bradfield on July 14th 1717. Martha’s baptism probably followed on 16/6/1725 but a record of her marriage is lacking; a baptismal record for Anne is also lacking. She may be the Ann Saunderson who married George Hobson at Bradfield on 14th October 1731. If so, that might give further thought to her attribution as Jonathan’s daughter-in-law. No sons are in evidence and the transfer of benefits to daughters supports the notion that there were none living. One son appears on the pedigree of the family in FMG vol ii p737, however. He was the Rev. Jonathan Sanderson, provided with a birth year of 1719 and a death date of 18/4/1747. Jonathan was a minister at Rovel in Northamptonshire and had married a Durrard of Leicestershire. That information can be changed and supplemented. Jonathan was very likely the son of Jonathan who was baptised at Bradfield on 13/3/1717-8. That date fits well with the marriage date for the parents – July 1717. Furthermore, a biographical sketch of the minister was written by a kinsman, Benjamin Hobson of Great Driffield[5]. It states Rev. Sanderson’s birth year to have been 1718; his father was a grocer of respectable means and the family worshipped at Stanington under the ministry of the Rev. S Smith. According to Hobson, Jonathan senior had one son and two daughters. Hobson tells us that the young Jonathan eschewed an apprenticeship and continued his learning under the tutelage of Rev. Wadsworth, a successor to Timothy Jollie in nonconformist tradition. In due course, he attended an independent academy in London from 1737 and from then went to Rowell on 16th February 1739-40. He was ordained on 3rd June 1741. Hobson clearly knew little of Jonathan’s wife, whom he had ascertained had the surname Durrad and came from Leicestershire. A marriage record from Rothwell (aka Rowell) gives the date of their union as 11/3/1742-3; they married by licence. Her forename was Mary. Hobson states that Jonathan and Mary produced a child (no sex or name given) that died in its infancy. Jonathan’s life was of no great duration after his marriage: he became consumptive and died in April 1747. Tamer and Martha receive some mention in Hobson’s work alongside many more references to Jonathan’s parents. Letters between family members are quoted extensively. They demonstrate that Tamer was the elder sister with Martha a younger sibling. With only three children mentioned as offspring it is understandable that Hunter believed the Hobson marriage must have been to one of them, rather than apparently to Anne. The exchange of letters points to Tamer having been ill but recovered by 24th June 1737; another to Tamar contains advice to always consult her parents, keep good company and not talk to scandalous persons etc.. It is unclear whether this is simply brotherly advice or an attempt to keep her on a straight and narrow path. The latter might be a possibility as this letter implies she might be in or around Worrall, designated as abounding with bad company! A man marrying in 1717 was probably born in the last quarter of the seventeenth century. The number of options from local parish records is small although one cannot disregard either the possibility of an outsider or a lost record. · Son of John, baptised at Bradfield 10/4/1685 · Son of Clement, baptised at Ecclesfield 6/3/1689-90 · Son of Jonathan, baptised at Wickersley 10/11/1692 The father of the first of these perhaps finds reference elsewhere. He was John Sanderson, of The Gate, Bradfield, and a taylor. A son of his named John was apprenticed as a cutler in 1686. Whilst only circumstantial in providing a link, one should not ignore Jonathan’s given profession of taylor in 1720, nor indeed the mention of holdings at Worrall. Tamer died a widow in 1785 and was buried at Bradfield on 15th December. The only Jonathan known to have died between 1761 and 1767 was buried at Sheffield on 30th December 1766. That fits very well with testator’s will being proved in May 1767. It may well be a record of his tomb inscription that was recorded from the Nether Chapel, Sheffield. The inscription recorded is fragmentary and gives the year of death in December of an unknown year before 1768 (the next burial recorded). The rest of the stone has inscriptions to members of the Jennins and (mainly) Hobson families, hence the possible connection. [1] Continuity and Change in a Pennine Community - Stannington 1660-1900, p88 [2] Ibid, citing ACM S 376 I, Sheffield Archives. The copy can be found on page 133. [3] Ibid, citing ACM S 377. The copy can be found on page 148. [4] ACM S 377, p90 [5] A Biographical Sketch of the Rev. Jonathan Sanderson, Formerly Minister of the Gospel at Rowell, in Northamptonshire: B Hobson, London, 1810 (Google Books)
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. I do realise that the items in the photos are situated in Eckington but the street does hold a Sheffield postcode, anyway back to the plot, the crucibles that have been utilised as part of a wall after their working life in the local Iron Works had been reached, the Iron Works was partially demolished for a road scheme to go ahead. Could someone enlighten me what was the name or the owners of the Iron Works and if any photos could be found of the once local industry in its working life would be excellent, I was just visiting Eckington but what an interesting place it really is.
    1 point
  21. Though there aren't that many, I thought I'd mention the used crucibles on top of the dividing wall between the house front gardens of 7 & 9 Brinsworth Rd. Catcliffe (photo taken from Google Street View). As they're mounted between decorative concrete blocks, could they have been put there in the 1970s?: I do fear for these crucibles as they look as though they could be removed and broken up at anytime!
    1 point
  22. Thanks Lysanderix and that's what I was going to suggest to Tozzin, as I have lived here for over 40 years and was told several years ago that they probably came from the old forge. It's a good example of recycling, which fits in nicely with today's trend. Here are 2 images I took today of the used crucibles in a ramshackle excuse for a wall at the top of Ashley Lane, Killamarsh (pic 3); obviously built with more luck then judgement! Still, it has lasted a long time. The other (pic 1) is incorporated in a sandstone wall, which although not facing the prevailing winds, has suffered badly from degradation. The houses look Victorian to me.
    1 point
  23. This keeps getting raised every now and then. All the Webb sewer lamps were decommissioned in the late 1960's their gas supply being cut off. They didn't burn the sewer gas, they burnt ordinary town gas, the action of the heat rising vented the sewers, hence they were all over the city. Sometime in the 1990's four of them were restored to working order in the Nether Edge area, partly funded by the local community and partly by the council. It was a hell of a job to get them re-connected to the gas supply, the gas companies didn't want to know, safety issues etc. but eventually it was sorted and I believe the gas was for free. The one on Brincliffe Edge Road has a particularly interesting history being painted red white and blue in 1977 to celebrate the Queens silver Jubilee. Nothing official of course, it was painted by renegade Radio Hallam presenter Roger Moffatt who lived nearby. Amey got the contract to maintain the lighting in Sheffield in 2012, they came in and swept all before them, so the writing was on the wall for the sewer lamps.
    1 point
  24. Indeed. And the Peggs were quite charitable in that respect. On Fentonville St we had a corner shop on the corner of Stemp St which was a godsend for my mum. The opposite corner was a chipshop. At the bottom of Stemp St on Langdon St there were shops on each corner . (I recall one was Margerison's), There was Mrs Britland at the bottom of Croydon St and on the corner of Langdon St/Mackenzie St Mrs Dronfield's off licence dispensed beer in jugs. She was also disposed to a slate. There was Nora's chippy half way along that block and another shop opposite Mrs Dronfield. What choice! But really there was no choice. For most of my childhood sweets were rationed, just like bacon, sugar and many other commodities. Lockdown due to Covid has nothing on the hardships of wartime and post war Sheffield. But, hey ! I'm 79 and still got all my marbles (not literally, I gave that up when I was about 10 yrs) and I have nothing but happy memories of Fentonville St and Sharrow, Sharrow Lane School and all of my peer group of that era.
    1 point
  25. Hi Fentonvillain, That's a very interesting observation. The directory's, Kelly's etc, for the 40/50's show how many small 'frontroom' shops there were in the Sharrow, Highfield, Lake District area. People didn't tend to have cars or fridges so they counldn't go very far or could keep food fresh, many things had to be bought on a daily basis. We lived on Buttermere Rd (Lake District) in the early 70's and it was interesting to note how many shops have been converted into houses by then. I talked to some of the older people who had lived around in the area from the 40's and they said a lot of the 'frontroom shops' allowed You to take items on 'tick' and You paid Your bill on Thursday or Friday when You were paid. It was very much a 'cash economy' - How things have changed! Wazzie Worrall.
    1 point
  26. The drainpipe at the side of the signs was fitted by me when I was an apprentice plumber in 1959.
    1 point
  27. Have a look at this survey, it includes a map of 1789 which I take to be associated with the Inclosures of Common and waste land at Ecclesfield. The Fairbanks were involved in creating many of the inclosure plans and Sheffield Archives may hold them under either Ecclesfield Inclosures references or under Fairbanks references (probably all been put under the Fairbanks reference ACM/MAPS) Archaaeological Survey Oughtibridge
    1 point
  28. I recall shopping at the Bungalow Stores with my mother in the late 1960s and early 1970s and it seemed old-fashioned even then. I recall a counter down each side and one across the back. A throwback to the old days. I also remember an old lady who served there and my most vivid memory is looking at cardboard tubes of Smarties through a glass case. I recall my mother bought me a tube and sat me on the wall outside while she continued shopping. Probably because I was misbehaving. The Bungalow Stores was eventually demolished, probably in the late 70s, and replaced with a private dwelling which is distinguishable for having pillars outside. With a twist of fate I eventually bought the bungalow next door which, I'm informed, was occupied by the owners of the shop. As I type this I'm in the exact position of the the original main door to my house which led the short distance next door to the Bungalow Stores. The door was switched to the other side of the house presumably when the Bungalow Stores was flattened. In the years since I've found an old Walls Ice Cream sign while digging the back garden which was most likely from the old shop. The only remaining feature of the shop was the dividing wall at the front which I sat on in a lifetime past. With a heavy heart I had to have this replaced two years ago as it was in danger of collapsing.
    1 point
  29. From the Court Rolls of George Earl of Shrewsbury. (From A descriptive Catalogue of Sheffield Manorial Records, Vol 2 compiled by T.Walter Hall)
    1 point
  30. The Old Queen's Head is the place referred to above as The Hall in the Ponds.
    1 point
  31. Gleadless Common in October 1971 and January 2008 The main changes are on the left although it doesn't look it as the house and telegraph pole are both clearly the same. However the old farm (out of view) has been done up, the school fields have been barriered and beyond a whole new small estate of houses has been developed.
    1 point
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