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  1. I think the Swift Tool Set was introduced by Spear and Jackson in the early 1950s.
    2 points
  2. From a Daily Telegraph article about the Monument in March 1932: "Part of the ground has been made into a small bowling green; in another spot is an old cab shelter, now used as a meeting place for the old men of the district, who may be seen enjoying a game of dominoes or indulging in a weighty argument there; another attraction is an arch consisting of the jaw bones of a whale; and inviting seats are arranged along the walks. It is a place of rest and recreation"
    1 point
  3. I used similar knives as a shoe repairer in the 60's. They needed breaking in and were frequently sharpened, so soon wore down, but we tended to have a favourite which we would not like anyone else to use. George Barnsley do a selection of shoe repair knives though they look a bit posher than the ones I used. https://www.georgebarnsleyandsons.co.uk/shoemaking-repair-knives
    1 point
  4. Hi again duckweed. I have found a mention under Norfolk Park that simply says :- " between 1912 - 1954 Bowling greens and tennis Courts were added " I am waiting to hear back from a lady who lives at Norfolk Park, and is on the Res Assn, she is most informative, so will let you know if I get any more details, regards Heartshome.
    1 point
  5. Came across this on an auction site, may or may not be connected? www.easyliveauction.com/catalogue/lot/-lot-508/
    1 point
  6. My suggestion is William Swift, a little mester, who operated from 139 Crescent Road, Walkley (later named Walkley Crescent Road). He died 21st January 1886 and didn't advertise anywhere so far as I can see. He employed one of his sons, Elijah, as a blade forger plus one other man part time. Elijah died aged 32 in 1889.
    1 point
  7. Hursts are Woodland, which Scurfield doesn't grasp in his map. I think he tends to rely on the later map by Fairbank to place any woods. But by the time of Fairbank the trees had been ripped out of the park and the field system put in place. Stone Hurst especially was extensive and seems to have been lined with Holly Trees on the top on what is Hutter Hill, or what later became Elm Tree Hill. The Holly trees extended out of the park all the way down to the place still called Hollinsend today. A traveller even commented on them around 1700. Skelton's lodge became Park House farm right on the boundary. And she also had Buck Wood, called Berrystorth wood back then. The Conduit Plaine is now called Deep Pit and the conduit was Kirk Bridge Dike, which still runs through it. The plaines were open areas. And thanks to a quirk of fate we can get an idea what they looked like from Bradgate Park, which never had the landscape people working on this old park.
    1 point
  8. Good thinking HD. Here's the relevant page from Harrison's Survey of 1637, together with Scurfield's recreation of the lost Harrison map, and a later map of 1894, though the field shapes have changed. The Pond would have been in Pond Meadow (ref 14) though it is not shown on Scurfield's map. The buildings to the south east of the pond seem to be known variously as "Keeper's Lodge","Arbourthorne Lodge" and "Paddock Farm"
    1 point
  9. A few pics from my recent visit
    1 point
  10. This is nostalgic, i had forgotten many of the venues. I started my years as a glass collector at the Bucaneer, collecting hundreds of plastic "skiffs" to be washed and re-used. I progressed to be a bouncer there, hmmm funny as i was only 17, but being 6'3" my age was never checked. Also a bouncer at the Penthouse and earned extra money by doing the beer lift, there was no elevator at the Penthouse and had to hump 9 gallon kegs up many flights of stairs to the bar at the top. Bounced for many years at the Wapemtake and was there from when Bucaneer closed until end of 1977, when i moved to Australia. Typical Saturday in Sheffield when not working : Saturday lunch at Craisy Daisy, the when that closed, downstairs in side walk cafe for a cappuccino and MASSIVE scone. Then off to Penthouse for afternoon beer lift. Home, quick change, back into tow n start off at Stone House, then the Yorkshire man, then Lord Nelson, then the Wap for a few and some heavy music, quick trip to the Zing Vaa chinese then off to Joesphines for some soul. Then at some ungodly hour on Sunday morning getting the 73 circular bus to somewhere near home,
    1 point
  11. I've started a site covering the history of Norton Lees - I'd appreciate any information, photos, maps etc. to add. http://nickrobinson.info/nortonlees/
    1 point
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