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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/07/20 in all areas

  1. 2 points
  2. 2 points
    Is it Twitch Hill Hall? There's a Twitch Hill in Horbury, but I don't know of any reference to Crookes.
  3. 2 points
    Hi all. I have written a biographical piece on my great-great grandfather, PC Thomas Clifford of Derbyshire Constabulary, who was posted to the area of Sheffield's border with Derbyshire in the early 1880s. This has now been published online, as a freely downloadable pdf document, by Derbyshire Family History Society (DFHS). The piece is 82 pages with as many period images, and takes about two hours to read. Many members of the community which PC Clifford patrolled were culters, and others wandered down from the city to drink in the pubs over the border. I therefore devote a significant amount of space to them. In case anyone has any use for links to the pdf, such as adding to a web page or sharing in other ways: The page where DFHS have placed the link to open the pdf - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/member_downloads.php?catid=6 Direct link for the pdf itself - https://www.dfhs.org.uk/filestore/PC_Thomas_Clifford_1880-85_110.pdf To navigate from the DFHS homepage, select 'Data & Downloads', then 'Downloads Area', and the link 'PC Clifford' appears under 'File categories (Public)'; this opens the page on which the link to the pdf appears I lived in Brimington on the north edge of Chesterfield in the mid-1990s when I worked in Sheffield, just off Ecclesall Road. Best wishes, John Clifford
  4. 1 point
    Hi all, On a recent trip to Darnall I spotted these two buildings in the main shopping area. They look like they've seen a bit of history in their time. Have they always been shops? Do we know anything about the history of these buildings?
  5. 1 point
    It’s a sad street scene though eh? In the Google street view, the only buildings visible are (left to right of shot) Amusement Arcade Charity Shop - RSPCA (closed) Dobsons (hooray!) Bookies (Paddy Power) Old Bank -Nat West was it? (closed) Charity Shop - Sally Bash Cake Box (hooray!) My Nan lived on the Triangle estate and I remember walking hand-in-hand down Handsworth Road (or sometimes through the bottom of High Hazels Park) to this shopping centre. It was buzzing with shops of all trades, full of life and wondrous place for a little lad. The chippies were legendary also and I might have been treat to a small bag of chips, to take home to my Nan’s, back up the hill on the 52 bus, as she couldn’t juggle me and the shopping bags! 😁 I pass by sometimes and sadly it’s a pale imitation of how it used to be, but symptomatic of most village / suburb centres now I suppose?
  6. 1 point
    Research in my tram books tells me the Handsworth tramway extension was opened in 1909 as far as Finchwell Road, and the Darnall spur was opened at the same time, in the early days used by alternate cars, but I suspect not for long.
  7. 1 point
    Yes, good shout. I can see the tracks on the maps I posted a while ago. I also just noticed on the old photo of the building with the “OXO” advertisement on the gable end, you can just make it out on the current maps on street view (top image)..... unless it’s my eyes playing tricks and/or wishful thinking?!
  8. 1 point
    The chip shops were on the other side of the road, do you remember Lomas's, their fishcakes superb
  9. 1 point
    Nice to see those buildings still there, they were certainly there when I was a child in the war. There was a little used tram terminus in the road at that point. There is a picture on the Crich Tram Museum site with a tram standing there and the left hand building in the shot. (I don't think I have permission to put it on here). I don't know when the tram spur was covered over, but the trams finished altogether in 1960.
  10. 1 point
    Hi SteveHB, saw a photo of a good stone TROUGH on Ughill Wood Lane, Bradfield
  11. 1 point
    I think this is my favorite explanation. There was no essential need for a bridge but building one would have certainly made for a grand entrance and indeed elevated perspective to the newly demarcated estate plots. As Edmund points out above the bridge doesnt go over the river but I acknowledge that that it could have added a challenge to cross although Sheffield was well in to culverting season by this point. So on that basis of what Rover says I would see the bridge as a means by which the new residents of this area could literally elevate themselves above the other existing residents by making such conspicuous and no doubt grandiose entrances and exits to the estate. It must have added to the desirability of the place.
  12. 1 point
    Schedule of street name changes in 1886
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    SHEFFIELD CITY CENTRE | A walking tour of Sheffield City Centre, Yorkshire, England - Filmed in 4k SHEFFIELD CITY CENTRE | A walking tour of Sheffield City Centre, Yorkshire, England - Filmed in 4k Watch it here on our new Videos section 👉 SHEFFIELD CITY CENTRE | A walking tour of Sheffield City Centre, Yorkshire, England - Filmed in 4k
  15. 1 point
    Seems no one has anything to say on this, so here's my take on it. Assuming World War 2 hadn't happened and the railways hadn't fallen into such a dilapidated state, and Labour didn't win the election, they Big Four would probably have survived, at least for a while. By the 1950's travel was changing, with an increase in road freight competition and the rise of the private car. Could the companies have competed any better than BR? Railways had to compete on a national scale as far as freight went, to keep the long haul stuff and let local distributors deal with the town areas. The trouble with the smaller depots like Darnall and Attercliffe was they were incredibly labour intensive, and costs were rising, so pushing the traffic onto the roads where fewer people were involved , hence lower costs. With the onset of containerisation new facilities would have to be built, but would each company want to go to that expense? Tinsley was already pretty redundant by the time it opened as the freight traffic had changed in just a few years. The electrification scheme started by the LNER would probably have been extended to London, there was originally a large order for the EM2's which was cut back to just seven, so it was obviously on the cards. How long the companies would have lasted is another matter, falling passenger numbers, falling freight loads, all due to road traffic, would probably have led to amalgamations and takeovers, and assuming the Government didn't get involved, we would probably end up with a couple of large private companies, like First and Stagecoach. Non profitable routes would have to be cut (just like local bus services are these days), so some rationalisation would be inevitable. It's difficult to say if Sheffield Victoria would still be with us today, there are so many variables, remember its staple traffic was coal, and that's gone, passenger numbers from the intermediate stations wouldn't be high enough to keep it viable so we are left with just the through traffic from Sheffield to Manchester. The alternative via the Hope Valley has the stone and cement traffic to keep it viable, so the Woodhead would probably been closed, but probably not as early as the 1980's. It's all conjecture, and others may have a different take on it.
  16. 1 point
    There is also a Twitch Hill in Hope. I found reference to a Twitch Hall Farm in newspapers from late 1880s to 1920s. The postcard seems to show a collection of buildings rather than a 'hall'.
  17. 1 point
    Its a strange one this one. Bernard's father according to the marriage cert was a John. There is a Bernard Mannion baptised in Sheffield with father John in 1860. Obviously doesn't have to be this particular one and it doesn't fit the death age given on the gravestone. I found the Bernard Mannion mentioned above having done 12 years in the army, he lists his place of birth as Dewsbury. I can't seem to find anything else that I could say for sure is this chap. It's an interesting hunt though.
  18. 1 point
    Thanks Guys Here`s the 1898 map of Norton for you LeadFarmer , also the pump at the top of Cobnar Road
  19. 1 point
    Anyone interested in the Darnall Staniforths, I've transcribed the 1860 publication Staniforthiana, which documents Thomas of Darnall, and later Liverpool: http://staniforthfamily.com/Staniforthiana.html
  20. 1 point
    A question that seems perfect for this thread. Would Victoria Station still have been here if the big four railway companies not been nationalised in 1948? My take on it would be yes it would be still here. The LMS and LNER would have been in competition still with each other. The LNER had the better and faster route to Manchester and there would have been no need to get rid of the over duplication of routes. Plus being private companies the Conservative party would have let them compete with the private road haulage firms and would have been more willing to invest in improvements, rather than moaning about how much public money was being used to top up the national railway system. LNER before the war had already made investments in the electrification scheme, so they would have continued to invest in electrification probably faster than British Rail did. The route to London from Victoria was much better than the Midland's. And I suspect the electrification scheme would have gone all the way to London King's Cross. In many way Nationalisation of the railway was disaster for it. Since it meant that someone looking at the whole system could see where two stations serving one place wasn't cost efficient. And even though the rail unions wanted it, they would have thought different I think if they could have seen how many staff lost their jobs because of it. And they lost jobs not because lines lost money. But because one person could view the entire system. And also the National system was easily undercut by private road transport arguing that the British Rail had more advantages over them. When they knew how to bypass them. Had the four railway operators still been running the system, they could have got as much investment as what the road lobby did. And things like building road bridges over the Humber without having a railway on it too, would have been unlikely to have happened. But BR could have never argued the case, since it would have been seen as asking for more public money to invest in the bridge scheme. Because Victoria had a good connection route with the suburbs of Sheffield that emerged later at Halfway, Mosbrough and Killamarsh, I believe that improvements to the stations, including a new one for Halfway itself would have taken place. Especially as the main line to London also would have still used the route. This would have cut the traffic down using the main roads into Sheffield, which was the argument for the expensive Supertram Scheme. Thus eliminating Supertram. Whereas under BR keeping the route open, when the London link had stopped, wasn't economic. Indeed running trains out of Midland station going North then diverting South would have been silly. And London trains coming down from the North from Rotherham and Leeds for example, again would not making sense turning them around to go via Nunnery Curve to get them back on LNER line to London. Ending up for the need of Supertram from Halfway to Sheffield. I rather doubt the Tinsley marshalling yard and depot would have been built though. The two railway companies would have looked at the long term economics of the scheme. Darnall depot would have continued in operation for the LNER and the Midland would have used the one at Attercliffe. The people at British Rail were thinking on a national scale for the movement of freight. Whereas the private road operators were on a local level on that subject, responding to what was needed by private companies. I suspect the four railway companies would have done the same. So would have built yards on the demand that was there already.
  21. 1 point
    Thanks for the photo', it's nice to see a few Darnall buildings that have not changed too much from my time round there (50/60 years ago) . From memory and including the building just shown on the right it was a row of smaller but very useful shops. On that part of Main Road there were shops selling virtually everything, plus a couple of good chip shops, pubs, and the club.
  22. 1 point
    Moorhead Crimea Monument in Sheffield City Centre
  23. 1 point
    Since the first post you quoted was written, I’ve joined the Traffic Dept at Crich and become a conductor. We use the Tardis in summer to store bottled water in for the crews to grab a drink in between trips. This summer (my first season) it has been packed out down there and the tardis has had many admirers. Some one mentioned, a few weeks back, that they though it was the last of its kind in existence.
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