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  1. Today
  2. tozzin

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    My Aunt Kate, born in Dublin, use to say to her sons when they released noxious gas , “ go out side and freshen up “ such a beautiful lady.
  3. peterinfrance

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    I just remembered another little gem Blowing off. As in "is that you blowing off?" Passing wind !
  4. Hopman

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    I'm basing my theory that my French teacher spent some time in India from his knowledge of Urdu. Each Wednesday morning the "Dustbin Wallahs" would come (the bins were right outside the classroom) and empty them. There was even a mock Latin verb: Bango, bangere, bangi, bangum.
  5. I believe that my uncle Walter Morton may have been landlord of this establishment at some time. Possibly 30s or 40s. Does anyone have any paths they could go down to find out for me? Would be most grateful!!!
  6. fentonvillain

    E.Friedrich & Son Ltd, German Butcher on the Wicker

    Looking at your previous posts we may well have been in the same profession but at rival stations
  7. Thank you Jake's Grandad Do you know if his father ran it before him ??? Do you anything else about them ??
  8. Yesterday
  9. Loads of local people used to buy electrical items from Halls. Going into post office for family allowance then across road to Halls to pay on weekly. Tom used to run the shop in the 80s, if he had not got the item you wanted in stock he would get it for you. My daughter used to go to school with his son Andrew.
  10. Sheffield History

    Human League

    Here's a photo i'd not seen before anywhere It's a bit out there this one isnt it!
  11. Last week
  12. MartinR

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    @tozzinI'm sure you're right. I can't say I'd ever use the term myself, but I can recall older masters at school using the term. Possibly picked up during National Service?
  13. MartinR

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    The OED's take on the word is "pertaining to or connected with", hence nao-wala (boatman) or Dilli-walla (inhabitant of Delhi). Examples given include Agra Walla (from Agra 1776), bangy-wollah (a porter who uses a bangy or yoke 1810), howdah-wallah (an elephant which carries a howdah 1864). By 1785 in was being used in English as Patriot-wallahs, Suffolk wallah (1853) or big-ship wallah (1917).
  14. tozzin

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    I suppose it depends on how old you are to have heard it, I heard it quite regular in the very late forties and early fifties, after my parents died so did the “ Punkah Wallah” phrase, sad in some respects for me anyway.
  15. Lysanderix

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    I was always led to believe the term Wallah came into the English language from soldiers returning home from service on the Indian sub continent.The tv series “ it ain’t half hot ere ,Mum”….popularised the term Punkah wallah . I must confess I have never heard the term used in our local dialect/ phrases.
  16. Markbaby

    E.Friedrich & Son Ltd, German Butcher on the Wicker

    Loved their Tomato Sausage as a kid!
  17. tozzin

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    Just looked the word Wallah up and a Wallah was a native or inhabitant of a specified place. "Bombay wallahs"
  18. Lemmy117

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    On the same theme, someone at work was always asked to be "char wallah", someone who made the tea.
  19. tozzin

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    Wallah is the correct spelling. It’s like the spelling of Verandah which I believe is the correct way but the letter H seems to have been discarded.
  20. Athy

    Local sayings from yesteryear!

    They were called "punkah wallahs", not sure of that spelling, perhaps "wallers", and I can remember "waller" being used in Sheffield to mean "worker" or "operative", for example when I was at junior school our class teacher called the milk monitors "milk wallers".
  21. There are some wonderful aerial photos of the area on britain from above from shortly after the war. Below is snipped from a 1948 series detailing the Twist Drill Works & environs. Britain from Above: https://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/en/image/EAW018795
  22. Heartshome

    Where is / was The Gate, Bradfield?

    Hia Richard. Old maps indicate that " GATE " was the area up off Burnt Hill Lane, left of Hagg Stones. Ok
  23. ajsimp

    The Grocers

    Hello Steve, That`s great, I think you are probably correct. Thanks Alan
  24. As a young boy living opposite the 'Dormer Drills' clock on Cemetery Road, I occasionally attended the nearby and now demolished, Congregational Church's Sunday School as well as a once weekly, early evening 'gathering' (only when the weather was too bad to play 'kick can' on Pearl Street and mainly with lads, who along with myself, were pupils at St Matthias C of E School). My one undying memory of the place is the bullet holes, kindly left by the Luftwaffe on one of their raids during the Sheffield blitz, that had punched through some of the North facing windows and the corresponding holes evident on the internal walls. As you can imagine, being young these tangible reminders of hostilities were the stuff 'Boys Own' dreams were made of and when left unsupervised, our attempts to retrieve the embedded bullet remnants using pen knifes etc had little success. Sad to say that's all I can remember about the place!
  25. AndyS

    Ellis Ward & Co?

    Hi Tozzin, Many thanks for your reply and the detailed info. I'm really sorry for the extremely long delay! in my notifying you of my appreciation but my original email address was terminated in 2003 due to the provider closing their customers accounts and therefore I didn't receive any notification and therefore assumed that no one had replied to my posting. I'll now revisit my family tree to see if I can make any sense of the details you've provided - I do have the Strafford's of Shepperd St [Shepherd St] (1841 census) details noted on my tree but the Isaac Ellis & Sons Ltd item may be the lead I've well been looking for.
  26. Lysanderix

    George Turton, Platts & Co

    As an old rolling mill buff it might interest those with a bent for recycling to know that Tinsley Rolling Mills produced thousands of tons of 3”x 3/16” rail key strip for both Turton Platts and their competitors in this market …Toledo Woodhead. All of this was rolled out of old scrap bullhead rail which was slit into 3 parts with the centre portion being rolled into small flats…especially for “rat traps”and the rest being rolled in a 12”double duo mill into key steel. As bullhead rail began being replaced by flat bottom rail the clip was redesigned into the “Pandrol” fixing using round silico-manganese spring steel bars….as used in most modern car coil springs.
  27. TINTAGEL CASTLE Said to be the home of King Arthur, with the wizard Merlin living in cave in the cove below the castle English Heritage have built a bridge across to it that was genuinely one of the most terrifying walks I've ever done - I was physically shaking and feeling sick all the way across Then there are cliff edges that are so open people were crawling on their bellies to look over the edge of them instead of just staying away Then there's the amazing King Arthur statue in the middle of nowhere, the cliff walkway, the beach, the camelot hotel overlooking the castle and more What an incredible amazing, stunning place
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