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  1. Today
  2. SteveHB

    Richards knife.

    From the 1957 Kelly's directory.
  3. Yesterday
  4. boginspro

    Richards knife.

    I have put a few bits about Wostenholm / Wolstenholm / Wolstenholme on the Sheffield Ebay items section here --------
  5. On Ebay at the moment described as "1930 pages from ledger with letters and advertising and price list from George Wostenholm and sons Sheffield. With Scottish connection." and "Pages from old sheffield ledger of George Wostenholm & sons dated 1930/31 totals 4 letters and 3 advertisements and 1 postcard" https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543357592?ul_noapp=true https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/163543349893?ul_noapp=true
  6. Voldy

    Do You remember rabbits

    During WW2 we had a couple of holidays in Derbyshire at Calver Sough, one particular memory was when a cereal crop field was being harvested. The cutting started and went in decreasing circles whilst guns at strategic points waited for rabbits being driven out into the open. At this point you will no doubt remember that Flanagan and Allen song "Run rabbit, run rabbit, run,run,run"! which started "On the farm every Friday,on the farm it's rabbit pie day". We certainly ate our share of rabbit in those days, chickens were far too valuable to be slaughtered other than at Christmastime. I also remember the sight of the affect Myxomatosis had on rabbits around 1953/54 whilst on National Service,it no doubt put many people off for a long time and hugely reduced the trade, hence the Chinese option referred to in SteveHB's post above.
  7. RLongden

    J Stead & Co.

    Obviously pre-Tippex days, as the poor lass in the typing pool couldn’t spell ‘Thornton Road’ correctly either? Nice to see list and chain discount pricing. With over 30 years in purchasing of industrial supplies, it was always slightly baffling that we would buy say nuts and bolts at list -25% -10% -73% and in pre-computer days, working out a stock order of 100+ lines was a pain in the backside!
  8. Last week
  9. SteveHB

    Do You remember rabbits

    Early 1970's I worked for one of the Boldocks, a well known Sheffield family in the wet fish & poultry business, so obviously we sold rabbits. You would think that a rabbit was just a rabbit, which it is, but we sold two sorts of rabbits, the fresh unskinned that was seen hanging in or outside the shop, you would ask for it to be cleaned and portioned, part of could be bought or the whole animal. The other rabbit was a bit less known to customers and the public, they came frozen and boxed from China, they came skinned and cleaned with an intact body, except for one thing, the frozen imports came with no head. The imports were often the clean rabbit portions seen for sale on the sellers slab, so no head, no fresh rabbit. No idea if this still applies today.
  10. Organgrinder

    Old Brewery Tap / Merry England/ Under the Boardwalk

    It was the original Black Swan but known to everyone as the Mucky Duck.
  11. Voldy

    Hello from Cornwall

    Here is an extract from the 1950 OS survey Meersbrook Park in June 1963.
  12. SteveHB

    Do You remember rabbits

    When I was very young (late 1950's - early 60's) my father had an allotment in the Farm grounds off Granville Road, there were lots of rabbits living in the railway embankment and the fields within the grounds. Dad used to set wire snares and catch them, rabbit stew was a regular meal in our house.
  13. The Merry England bar was under the Black Swan, it used to open late in the evening when the Black Swan closed.
  14. History dude

    Do You remember rabbits

    They had rabbits hanging up in the meat and fish market of Castle Market in the 60's and 70's. Still with fur on!
  15. southside

    J Stead & Co.

    J Stead and Co became part of the Balfour Darwin Group in 1961! The Plumbing firm I worked for carried out the plumbing maintenance for the group and during the long cold winter of 1963 i think I worked at most of the group's premises. The Sheffield Forge and Rolling Mill at Millsands and a Wire Mill at Kellam Island. Andrews Toledo on Neepsend Lane. Wardsend Works on Penistone Road and a Stockyard on Livesey Street. A Forge and Rolling Mill at Beeley Wood and the Fitzwilliam Works on Sheffield Road, Tinsley.
  16. rover1949

    Old Brewery Tap / Merry England/ Under the Boardwalk

    That's the place but not the original name.
  17. Lyn 1

    Do You remember rabbits

    I had a lovely white rabbit called Snowy as pet until my dad got hungry...........Worst part was thinking the rabbit was lost and I ate some too. Think I was in my teens when I found out.
  18. Here’s a photo of the Old Brewery Tap. Perhaps this will be familiar to some? http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;t09575&pos=139&action=zoom&id=130741
  19. rover1949

    Old Brewery Tap / Merry England/ Under the Boardwalk

    There was definitely a separate bar underneath the Black Swan around 1967-68, we used to meet there from Bridge St bus station. I think it was called the Sidewalk at the time but could be wrong.
  20. lapsed blade

    Do You remember rabbits

    There was a shop on London Rd were they hung in the window and their heads were covered by a brown paper and the blood would drip on the counter,quess what I'm having for tea
  21. I understand the former pub under the 'Black Swan' is due to reopen at some point this year as a sports bar. Does anyone know if it opened when the Black Swan was built in the 60s or only opened in 1976 when I believe it became the Sam Smith's 'Old Brewery Tap'...if so what was the downstairs used for before this?
  22. Trying to trace biological father's origins. I think he was born in early 1940s and grew up on the Manor estate, where he was raised by his grand-mother. DNA research has shown that he must have been part of the Ashton family (and Lindley?) who worked in the cutlery industry at the end of 19 century and lived in Eccleshall area. Possible name Ian Mills and mother's name was Helen? Many thanks for any help! Emma
  23. Kalfred

    Richards knife.

    I saw on line a nice image of a box and its 6 table knives that I thought some members of the forum might find of interest. I had a quick look to see if they would make a relevant addition to somebody else’s post. I did at first cause myself a problem by looking for “Wolstenholme George” in the search field but a helpful post I found told me the “e” at the end of the surname had been dropped. I looked carefully at my saved image again and saw I needed to be searching for “George Wostenholm” because not only was there no “e” but also no first “l”. Thus here I am with these, perhaps, less exciting knives but with a fantastic mini catalogue of some of the specialist items the company made. After trawling for my “G.W” on the forum I found I had a bit of confusion in my mind and felt a little bit of research was still needed. From our own forum I found the reference that “George Wostenholm, cutler's mark granted 22/12/1694” Then however it also seems that the Sheffield company of George Wolstenholme (born 1717 possibly) developed in 1745 though at Stannington just outside the City. George’s son Henry carried the business on until 1803 when George’s grandson, George 2, took over. The company moved to Sheffield, premises being called “Rockingham Works”, largely making razors and penknives. The difficulty of getting the “Wolstenholme” name on the latter’s small blades necessitated the shorter “Wostenholm” surname being generated. The 2nd George was in partnership with his own son George 3 in 1825 but died 1834 and the original George’s great grandson, George 3 carried on. Although I think there were too many “Georges” in this company, this George 3 installed the company into a new purpose built premises, Washington Works. This name was possibly chosen because of the large number of specialist knives that they sold to the USA. The reference below may be interesting. https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/3082-hibbard-spencer-and-bartlett/?do=findComment&comment=13410 The company became “Ltd.” in 1875 but George 3 appears to have died in 1876, leaving a widow and no children. A reference said that for the years 1876-1880 the company gave annual average dividends of 10% on average profits of £10203. Just before WWI a “Thomas Gilbert Wolstenholme” came to the leadership of the company and made changes to take the company further into the 20th century. Things did not all go totally smoothly and there was even a misfortune in that damage occurred to the “Washington Works” due to WW2 bombing. Below are a couple more images for “Wostenholm and Son”. We have the cutlery box as shown previously plus another box and markings on the different blades they contained. If you look at the close up of the 2 boxes you can see the manufacturer’s name is described differently. The greenish box with the “Tally Ho!” trademark on has the company name “George Wostenholm & Son Ltd” while the other box lid has the company name “George Wostenholm & Son’s”. This could be dating evidence for the 2 lots of knives. My original thought was that “& Son’s” must have been later but then I remembered my English grammar and worked out it was cutlery “belonging” to only one son. I think the “Ltd” with the “Firth Stainless” knives is the most recent item but they may in fact not be very far apart in age. In 1971 another big Sheffield player “Joseph Rodgers” took over “Wostenholm” but in 1986 that pair along with their trademarks were part of the “Egginton Group”. This might be an example of “what goes around, comes around”. The “Tally Ho!” mark was bought by George 3 in 1860 from “M.Hunter’s”, he with his father having in 1826 already obtained their knife famed “I*XL” (I excel) trademark and in 1843 he had bought “The Pipe Trade Mark”. That mark being the “oldest cutlery trademark on the Register of the Sheffield Cutlers’ Company” and granted in 1694. Funny that year appears familia! Now, if the old company’s history was confusing with “Georges”, then the 20th history seems no different to me. Along with the Egginton Group claiming “Wostenholm” history another company established 1993, “TGW International” claims the same history. This latter company had its seed in the Wostenholm’s concern nurtured from 1908 by the “Thomas Gilbert Wolstenholme” noted earlier. Hopefully the “Big Players on The Forum” can sort this out for us. Kalfred
  24. lapsed blade

    this is me

    make every day an adventure you don't know when its your last one
  25. lapsed blade

    this is me

    just a quick intro I was born and raised in Sheffield moved to Chesterfield after marring in 74 still got a brother and sister living in sheff would love to hear from anyone who attended Greystones sec Mod school early sixties or who was a member of the 34 Boys Brigade at Cemetery rd congregational church
  26. DavyAllan

    Sheffield v Glasgow

    Incomplete list here http://www.scottish-football-historical-archive.co.nf/representative-matches.htm
  27. Blackmacjay

    Do You remember rabbits

    Yes, I remember them well and, as far as I know, they were not rationed. Then, of course, there was that dreadful disease that killed most of the wild rabbits. At least, here in the USA, one can buy farmed rabbits but not as good as the old wild rabbits.
  28. peterinfrance

    greystones secondary modern

    I also attended Greystones. I cannot remember the dates but it was around 1957/8. a little earlier than you. I was only there for a short while before going to Rowlinson.
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