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  3. History dude

    OLD SAYINGS

    LOOKING THROUGH ROSE TINTED GLASSES The correct version being Rose Coloured Spectacles, which first appeared in Tom Brown at Oxford (1861) by Thomas Hughes. TRUTH WILL'OUT IN THE END is Shakespeare. He's responsible for many of the sayings we still use. The first example of 'dog's dinner' that I have found in print is from The Miami News, October 1933: And on a bus top at a 57th St. traficc halt a youth from the sidewalk called to a young caigaet-smoking lady at the rail: "What you doing sitting there all dressed up like a dog's dinner?" Pie In The Sky is a American song from 1911. Lord and Lady Muck came about around 1900 from Australia.
  4. Yesterday
  5. Heartshome

    OLD SAYINGS

    Ok, rope aside, there are more sayings I've remembered :- RED SKY AT NIGHT, SHEPHERDS DELIGHT. RED SKY AT MORNING, SHEPHERDS WARNING. - MEN DON'T MAKE PASSES, AT GIRLS WHO WEAR GLASSES. - OAK BEFORE THE ASH, THERE'S GOING TO BE A SPLASH. ASH BEFORE THE OAK, THERE'S GOING TO BE A SOAK. - IT'S THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM. - DON'T MAKE WAVES. - YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU. - HE/SHE HAD A GOOD INNINGS. - HEN PECKED HUSBAND. - CHILDREN, SHOULD BE SEEN AND NOT HEARD. - AS GOOD AS GOLD. - LOOKING THROUGH ROSE TINTED GLASSES. - IT'S JUST PIE IN THE SKY. - SHE'S A RIGHT DOLLY DAYDREAM. - HE THINKS HE'S LORD MUCK. - A RIGHT FLASH HARRY. - A RIGHT FANCY MADAM. - A RIGHT GUTTER SNIPE. - PULLING THE WOOL OVER YOUR EYES. - BENDING YOUR EAR. - PULLING YOUR LEG. - PULLING A FAST ONE. - AS STIFF AS A PARSONS COLLAR. - WHAT GOES ROUND, COMES ROUND. - IT'LL COME BACK AND BITE 'EM. - TRUTH WILL'OUT IN THE END. - SALT OF THE EARTH. - CLIMBING THE LADDER OF SUCCESS. - DRIVING ME ROUND THE BEND. - DRIVING ME UP THE WALL. - AS HAPPY AS A PIG IN MUCK. - A RIGHT DOGS DINNER. :- have you got more you can add ? It is amazing how many sayings we use without realising it.
  6. rover1949

    OLD SAYINGS

    Not convinced about the hangman theory. I prefer the naval connection regarding 'money for old rope', which is similar to the expression 'learning the ropes'. On the old sailing ships every rope had a specific function and needed to be of a certain length. When they became frayed the rope would be cut up and any usable short lengths sold on at the next port. Frayed bits could well have ended up as oakum but intact rope would still have had some value.
  7. lysander

    Channing Hall, Surrey Street

    It was regularly used by street questionnaire/public opinion survey merchants. I went in with the promise of sampling a new beverage. It was bl**dy awful and I never , ever saw it being sold in shops.
  8. lysander

    OLD SAYINGS

    Henry was being almost "kind " to Anne. English axe executioners were renowned for being butchers by comparison with their sword wielding French counterparts.!
  9. Does anyone know what this building has become? I did hear it was now a mosque but that may not be true? I worked there in the library in the early 1990s. What an elegant place it was then!!!!
  10. When I attended St.Patricks Church Youth Club, Sheffield Lane Top, in the mid to late 1950s we would sometimes go over to dances at St.Charles. Other times it would be to dances at St.Thomas More at Parson Cross and at at a little chapel on Herries Road, now a funeral directors.
  11. Sheffield History

    Eyam Plague Village in Derbyshire

    I went on the bus So easy to get there/back from there Via Chatsworth Estate too - lovely!
  12. Last week
  13. History dude

    OLD SAYINGS

    Not baked beans. More like our broad bean only tougher. "He hasn't got a bean". Would be the form. A sort of bean soup was the mainstay. Executioners were not employees, but self employed. The head's man axe was his own. So was the rope. He would have got a fee for doing the deed. The victim also paid the executioner to show it was not him doing it personally. Henry VIII, even brought in a swordsman form France to chop Anne's head off. The executioner for Charles the 1st is believed to come from Sheffield. I suppose they had to travel about it. Since there can't have been a lot of people who could do the job, or even wanted it. Plus despite what we might think even a regular thing. Convicts didn't get paid for making rope or doing anything with it. So how would the expression get it's meaning of easy money to the public at large? Interestingly enough most of your spellings for Sheffield words actually come from the older forms of English. Some even Old English. It wasn't till Doctor Johnsons Dictionary came out that many of the spellings of modern words came about and he standardised them. For example in Old English you could not say is it time "to wake up". Instead it was "wacken". Commonly used in Sheffield as: hasn't tha wacken up yet? What we might call "accent" is just the remnants of old languages left over and not used anymore in the mainstream.
  14. sevans

    Old Photos of Gleadless

    Replying, very late, to Athy. I’ve just stumbled across the forum again. Some of the names you mentioned as being in your class I knew too, though I think we were not in the same class. John Hall had a younger sister, Mary, who was in my class. Susan Morrell was a couple of years older than me and lived near the bottom of Ridgehill Avenue. Alec Dorling was in my class. He went to King Ted’s with John Clark and John Repon. More names from my class: Neil Dalton, Jeffrey Lake, John Youle, Richard Palnt, Sheryl Lewis, Jane Needham, Cynthia Gould, Anne Stevenson, Ann Brown, Pauline Hill, Barabara Ward, Elaine Gibbs, Elizabeth Coy. The hut on the left behind Miss Metcalfe was Mr Iosson’s class with the bank to the stream and park behind it.
  15. RLongden

    Channing Hall, Surrey Street

    I remember Channing Hall in the early 80’s, when there always used to be a ‘Clearance Sale’ of electronic goods, lighters, watches, that kind of stuff, which had billboards that used to entice you off Fargate. WHAT A LOAD OF TAT IS WAS! I remember being suckered in several times and having a wander around, thinking “do they think we’re stupid or what”, before walking out, with my hard-earned still intact..... nice building though.....
  16. Thorntons girl

    Sheffield history fair

    You are very welcome Peter, you will really enjoy it, there is so much to do!
  17. RLongden

    Beighton School

    Is that Reignhead, built in 1989, or Brookhouse, built probably more than 100 years prior? I’m guessing Brookhouse, as in the 60’s, Reignhead was farmland.....
  18. RLongden

    The Yorkshire Grey Pub

    Picture Sheffield never fails to deliver....... http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?&searchterms=Yorkshire_grey&action=search&keywords=all%3BCONTAINS%3B%Yorkshire_grey%%3B#rowNumber6
  19. RLongden

    OLD SAYINGS

    .... as in “wheers tha bean?” or “bean theer, dun that, got t’shut”.... Medieval diets for the rich and poor, but not even a mention of a tin opener, never mind a bean?! http://historylearning.com/medieval-england/food-drink-in-medieval-england/ Also, was the hangman’s rope his to sell? I would have thought he was an employee of the authorities ordering the execution and therefore no more an owner of the rope, than an executioner owned his axe? There are as many references to ships caulking as there are hangman’s souvenirs, but I know which one I’d put my money on?!...
  20. southside

    OLD SAYINGS

    Elbow Grease! or as they say in Sheffield. Geeit some elboor
  21. History dude

    OLD SAYINGS

    I do know that many of the sayings with "bean" in them originate due to the fact that during the medieval period the bean was a major source for everyone's diet. So it was very common. And therefore cheap!
  22. History dude

    OLD SAYINGS

    Doubt it. The rope wasn't sold to relatives, but to those who went to see executions. It was a way for the executioner to make some money. It was very popular to watch executions and the memorably from them was worth quite a bit of money. Hence the saying which means "easy money".
  23. tozzin

    OLD SAYINGS

    I thought this was a saying about buying old rope that was unpicked by workhouse inmates and convicts , the result was Oakum, these bits were used for caulking the decks of wooden ships. I would have thought that the family of hanged criminals didn't have " Two ha pennies to rub together" and to be reminded by a piece of rope that was used to hang a family member would only bring sadness.
  24. History dude

    OLD SAYINGS

    Money for old rope - was the money that the hangman got from selling bits of the rope of the victims he hanged.
  25. History dude

    Bastardy cases

    I should also have said that the cases were generally brought to the attention of the Parish officials by the need of the parish not wanting to pay out poor relief, not by the mother trying to claim support from the father. In fact the mother would have found the whole thing as strangers passing judgement on her, which in most cases they were! Sometimes these cases would also occur if the mother died leaving any children to the parish to deal with. And the local population believed the father to be still alive and had abandoned the mother and children. In some places these "bastardy returns" as they were called were highly prised and they went over the top to collect them! It really cut the amount given in parish relief if you could find a father to pay for them!
  26. Contact the archives and they will give you the information you require. I know that you have to write for permission but the address I have is from 2011 and could be out of date now. Angela
  27. southside

    Bastardy cases

    Hi Thorntons girl. There could be a clue in your relatives name. My Father and Grandfather were both registered with name of the Father left blank. But both my Father and Grandfather were given the surname of the Father for second christian names by their Mothers.
  28. That old style road sign! They don't make them like that any more!
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