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    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


    • Points

      11

    • Content Count

      6,948


  2. leksand

    leksand

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      7

    • Content Count

      96


  3. RichardS

    RichardS

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      7

    • Content Count

      549


  4. paulhib48

    paulhib48

    Sheffield History Member


    • Points

      7

    • Content Count

      48


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 16/01/21 in all areas

  1. The time captured in one small paragraph, my Dad took me into the fish market on Saturday Afternoon for a plate of cockles or mussels, the place was heaving so I had to hold his hand all the time we were in there otherwise I could be swept along with the crowd, it was the only place I’ve ever seen a deer hung up ready to be butchered. All gone, Sheffield is a shadow of what it use to be, the Market is a poor substitute for what we lost. I hate the supermarkets, I would much rather see the small independent shops, grocers, butchers, green grocers, clothes shops, shoe shops, toy shops but their
    2 points
  2. I started work in 1955 at the Wicker Goods Station, Saville Street and can confirm that wagons such as these were still in very common use in the 50's. I also recall Bogies amongst them too - some I think were used by National Benzole petrol & oil company who were based at Lumley Street.
    2 points
  3. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were th
    2 points
  4. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  5. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    2 points
  6. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  7. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  8. Wow! That's got to be a now missing section of Bard Street, looking down over the top of High Street Lane. They'd be stood on a path in a bit of parkland today (or perhaps have long since slid down into the road depending on recent weather).
    2 points
  9. I know this is from a few months ago but I've only just come across it. I worked at Ralstons for a couple of years in the early 70s. Hard, mucky work but have some good memories
    1 point
  10. Full film up here on my vimeo alongside all other Sheffield Film Co-op titles https://vimeopro.com/alexglenwilson/sheffield-film-co-op digitised from original material with blessing of SF
    1 point
  11. I well recall, periodically, spending Saturday afternoons in BGs sumptuous tailors shop, shown here. I was only a kid, 10 or so but even at that tender age couldn’t but be impressed at premises ...the spaciousness of the place - big soft leather couches, piles of expensive ‘coffee table magazines’ which probably cost a chunk out of an average working persons wage, though mainly directed at men in those days, so no ‘Hellos’ or ‘Beanos’ for long - suffering wives and kids waiting for husband or dad to be measured up, fitted, or whatever. Tea, Coffee provide in a civilised way - NO confounded, v
    1 point
  12. There has been an Assay Office in Sheffield since 1773, when local silversmiths, who resented the inconvenience of having to send their wares to London for hallmarking, joined with Birmingham petitioners to ask Parliament for their own Offices. Despite fierce opposition from the London Goldsmiths' Company, an Act of Parliament was passed, granting Sheffield the right to assay silver. Because the Select Committee which considered the petition had uncovered so many abuses by the existing Assay Offices, Parliament made sure that the new ones were more strictly controlled. The Act appointed t
    1 point
  13. Hard to believe we had at least two hospitals dedicated to chest diseases and a full time mass X Ray centre in Ellin St at the bottom of The Moor. (Winter St hospital; King Edwards, Rivelin and I seem to recall there was a dedicated chest unit somewhere around Queens Road/ Olive Grove area but also Nether Edge Hospital, Fir Vale and Lodge Moor all had chest units. My own father died of lung cancer in Lodge Moor.)
    1 point
  14. The only happier times I can remember are before Park Square Roundabout was built 😉 !!
    1 point
  15. Not sure about "Her parents were called Robert and Edith (nee Bowen)." and born 1887? Edith was born 15th of either Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr 1889. The 1939 Register is badly written and transcribed. Edith's birth was registered in quarter 2 1889 her mothers maiden name was Lee, she was baptised at Carbrook on 15th May 1889, daughter of Robert and Sarah Ann Laver. Edith's marriage certificate age agrees - she was 26 in 1915. Her father Robert Laver married her mother Sarah Ann Lee at Wath-upon-Dearne on 14th October 1872 - he was a widowed coalmine engine tender, son of Thomas Laver, als
    1 point
  16. Great views from Smithcroft Wood / Shirecliffe Allotments. Brought back memories of the later 40's when the "White Bridge" was a popular vantage point to see the steam trains slogging up to Penistone, and to get a free long distance view of the Speedway on match nights! A further frame to the right would have revealed another popular spectator venue
    1 point
  17. I was a barman at the railway for a time. Was a great traditional pub with plenty of characters.
    1 point
  18. Yes, Looking across High Street towards Change Alley !
    1 point
  19. This set is around the end of Sheffield Road and Shepcote Lane, with some photos taken from top deck of Tinsley viaduct. 3rd one down is the transport cafe, next door to the Plumpers, now American Golf. If you look on Google maps aerial view, you can still see the ‘CAFE’ letters painted on the roof.
    1 point
  20. My grandparents and other relatives are buried in St Thomas' and I've visited several times. There has never been any problem except the amount of brambles and ivy covering parts of the graveyard. I'd suggest wearing long sleeved gardening gear, heavy boots, heavy duty gloves and taking secateurs and long handled cutters. You can park on the site near the building, or plenty by the side of the road. One relative was the twelfth burial in the graveyard, one grave away from the church wall and despite having a copy of the plan (pasted inside the front cover of the register), I've still not fo
    1 point
  21. Answer in this thread, which surely must be connected? Huge coincidence if not?
    1 point
  22. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.4069768,-1.4326797,3a,75y,126.11h,84.44t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s-9a238ii3X8nlVpeUpd94A!2e0!7i16384!8i8192!5m1!1e1 I don't know the place, but the above link will take you to Google maps and seems to show that the graveyard is unmolested.
    1 point
  23. I just wonder what the shelf life of these buildings will turn out to be, I was the landlord’s representative in respect of Fargate Court back in the 1970’s. This was built circa 1960 and was in a terrible state less than 20 years into it’s life, basements constantly flooded, cracks had started to appear in it’s fabric, all windows were single glazed in metal frames, I assume that at least these have been upgraded. I have no idea of your age paulhib48, but hazard a guess that you will outlive many of these buildings.
    1 point
  24. Beat me to it! Poundland now and A Library iirc
    1 point
  25. FBT was based on Carlisle St. East AND Saville Street (Jncs Windsor St to Princess St) I don't recognise the building, but there WAS a similar building just on Harleston St, (?) where shear bl**es were made (Can't say that can we Neal?) Also look for bessemer house just townside of Harleston St, I'm sure that was FBTs too. I left in 1981.
    1 point
  26. Wow thank you so much for these - they've brought back so many memories The Dog And Partridge!! Forgot all about that!
    1 point
  27. Had a walk in attercliffe earlier and took these photos with comparisons
    1 point
  28. This amateur film gives a revealing picture into top flight football in England, the old First Division, in the mid-1960s. The film shows action from Sheffield Wednesday playing at home at Hillsborough Stadium to Arsenal, possibly the match in March 1964: the Scottish centre half Ian Ure looks to be playing for Arsenal. The other two games have quite small crowds, so are probably both reserve team fixtures, possibly against Manchester United and Blackpool. These films were taken by keen Sheffield Wednesday supporter Harry Wilson of Barnsley, who also filmed around the same time the w
    1 point
  29. Thanks for a great photo. Great to see it whilst it still looked like the Sheffield I loved, nice and tidy with the markets and proper roads & open spaces & car parks. I can't bear to see it with all the high rise buildings blocking out all the light and nothing but hotels and apartments. Looks more and more like America and very little that's nice, ever came from that place.
    1 point
  30. The main function of the building was the railway offices of course. I was on a Manpower Services Commission (MSC) Work Experience Scheme with British Rail in 1977. I started in that building. Unfortunately nobody bothered to explain the scheme to the vast majority of the staff. This caused me lots of trouble, with staff thinking I was cheap labour. There was also an agency called "Manpower" and many staff confused the agency with the first name of the work scheme provider. I was paid an allowance of about £16 pounds a week for a 9 to 5 hours job. The scheme allowed me mostly to watch the job
    1 point
  31. did me when i first saw them. brings back memories of being sat outside halfords as a kid in the 90s in my dads Peugeot 309. back and forth getting alsorts of parts because it was running like a bag of spanners 😄
    1 point
  32. The downstairs part of Sheaf House accessed by the yard round the back was occupied by WH Smith Wholesale. They supplied most of the newsagents in Sheffield with newspapers and mags from there in the 60s/70s and maybe later. They also had a showroom where you could buy toys and stationery etc The postal address was : Sheaf House , Sheaf Street
    1 point
  33. For absolutely no reason other than I was looking something up in it, I decided to scan the pub pages from the directory and upload them. Co-vid times of boredom maybe??!!??
    1 point
  34. Beautiful St Andrew's Church. What a sad loss. Sang in the choir when Mr Armstrong was choir master and Keith Robinson was head choirboy. Rev Robson became the Vicar whilst I was there, too. But I have to say that the unusual angle from which this photo was taken had me fooled. I thought it was St Andrew's but couldn't work out anything else. The silhouette looks a bit like another church I went to, Victoria Methodist on City Road. A real teaser!
    1 point
  35. Can confirm. Below, from a photo of 2019 of the area where they were, shows some of those yellow & black brick structures as seen in the last screenshot (with metalwork removed).
    1 point
  36. It was the centre of Hell In December 1940!
    1 point
  37. Glossop Road Baths-spent many happy hours there in the late 1950s.
    1 point
  38. Must say in my life time it's always looked much the same ,from the exterior that is. Much demolition/dismantling was done in the past with materials being reused for new construction in the area.
    1 point
  39. In 1993 I was on holiday in the Isle of Man, and visited Murray’s Motorcycle Museum. One of the exhibits caught my attention – it was a framed AutoCycle Union Certificate of Performance for the Wilkin motorcycle which I noted had been made in Sheffield at Onslow Road, a couple of roads away from where I grew up. I took a poor photograph of the certificate. In 2005 Peter Murray announced that the museum was closing and asked for people to register their interest in buying the exhibits. I asked to buy the ACU certificate, but never heard anything. I presume there was insufficient interest in
    1 point
  40. I see two women, in the middle of the road, dodging the low-flying reindeer. More numerous than seagulls on Bridlington sea-front they were. In those days, you used to get whole flocks of them, (women shoppers and reindeer), around Sheffield City Centre at that time of year. You don't tend to see so many of either these days. Jute coal-sacks - blooming awful things to carry when soaking wet, even more so when you had a lot of slack in the coal.
    1 point
  41. According to the technical info released with the movie the locations given are:- Burbage Rocks, Derbyshire, England. Gleadless Valley, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Heavygate Road, Crookes, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Millstone Edge, Derbyshire, England. The Vine Pub, Cemetary Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Thorpe Marsh Power Station, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. Plus a couple more I noticed Tinsley cooling towers(RIP) Fox & Duck, Sheffield Road Tinsley The Country and Western nigh
    1 point
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