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    DaveH

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    Edmund

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    lysandernovo

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    SteveHB

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 21/02/21 in Posts

  1. Hi Athy, I've not heard 'Like Knitting Sand' or 'Plaiting Fog...' before. When I worked for Derbyhire CC in the early 90's one of my colleagues used to say 'It's Like Knitting Fog!' She was usually referring to the complete nonsense which senior people came out with in meetings. Another expression which came out of those meetings was 'Purposeful Dithering'. I little later on another 'bright spark' came up with 'Bullshit Bingo'. Everytime somebody came out with a nonsense expression in a meeting he would tick a card and then when he had a straight line shout 'House'. Unfortunately none of
    2 points
  2. I was looking through some photos I had saved, and what a surprise, the London Road shop 🙂
    2 points
  3. Looks like George William Rusling of 206 Brook Hill in 1911. In 1896 the Rusling Brothers plumbing business based at 32 Spital Hill had been dissolved and brother Charles Oakes Rusling set up on his own at 62 Spital Hill. By the time of his death in 1935 George was at 44 Leavygreave Road, though he died at 1 Rutland Park. In his spare time George was chapel steward at the Carver Street chapel and was one of the original members of the Sheffield Methodist Council. George's wife Ann helped in the shop and son George was also a plumber, in fact when George junior died in 1978 he had been a "D
    1 point
  4. I was born in Sheffield, raised in these parts but spent time in NE Derbyshire....I have always used "duck" whether here or across the border. I think two world wars with MASSIVE military service and much more regional travel has helped mix our local expressions...One from Kent I adopted was...."It's like plaiting fog trying to reason with you"...and that was very true as far as the lady in question was concerned!!😄
    1 point
  5. I worked just around the corner, so found it very convenient, plus there were most often no queues to worry about.
    1 point
  6. A.V.E.C. (AUDIO VISUAL ELECTRONIC CONTRACTORS) LIMITED was a Private Limited Company, registration number 01598462, established in United Kingdom on the 19. November 1981. The company was in business for 24 years and 7 months. The business of the company by SIC and NACE code was "6312 - Storage and warehousing". It was "DISSOLVED VIA VOLUNTARY STRIKE-OFF" from the 18th July 2006.
    1 point
  7. Hanbidge advert from a 1929 tram & bus timetable.
    1 point
  8. 1 point
  9. Fuller's earth is a type of clay which as well as its ancient use for fulling was also used as a beauty aid and for household cleaning. It would have been a familiar site in the first half of the 20C. Therefore the saying is contrasting "this earth" (the real world) and "fuller's earth" (somewhere else, possibly a mythical place). I suspect therefore that your mother's saying translates to "I don't know where I am".
    1 point
  10. The electrified line was fully operational on 30/05/1954... delayed by several months following a problem with the new Woodhead tunnel.
    1 point
  11. "Rub 'im down wi potted mayt"
    1 point
  12. Steve..... Thank you so much and what a wonderful coincidence that passing the shop is what my dad, were he still alive, would be pleased to see, a Robert's tram car....
    1 point
  13. Okay, so, I have tried not to count the ones you have already mentioned above, and this is what I have got so far: William Lawson, '2' (Hornby) Thomas Black '49' (Bachmann, triple set with next two wagons) Tinsley Park Collieries '2241' (as above) Newton Chambers '3751' (as above) Renishaw Iron '917' (Oxford Rail) Nunnery Colliery '1574' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Geoffrey Allison) Manchester & Sheffield Tar Works '19' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Rails) Sheffield & Ecclesall Co-op 'No 13' (limited edition, by Dapol for unknown)
    1 point
  14. Not the 60s / 70s but the birth of the Millhouses pool: The Ministry of Health sanctioned a loan of £10,500 for the pool to be repaid over 30 years. It was under construction in March 1929 and the Parks and Burial Grounds Committee agreed that admission should be free, but there would be charges for towels etc. Mixed bathing would be allowed and the pool would not open on Sundays. In June the specification was altered to make it suitable for water polo (the 6 foot deep area was increased to allow polo to be played crosswise) but it was found that the depth could not be increased from the
    1 point
  15. Taken by my father around 1962. I know because I am the toddler in the hat lol.
    1 point
  16. Gleadless Common in October 1971 and January 2008 The main changes are on the left although it doesn't look it as the house and telegraph pole are both clearly the same. However the old farm (out of view) has been done up, the school fields have been barriered and beyond a whole new small estate of houses has been developed.
    1 point
  17. The train in the second picture is further forward than in the first pic. Also the wagons were not attached to the engine and look as if they are on the opposite track going in the other direction. You can also see the engine driver in the first and not in the second so it suggets that the second pic was taken after the first. Finally, and this is real geek time, the shadow from the beacon on the crossing is almost identical so the pics must have been taken within minutes if not a few seconds.
    1 point
  18. OK RichardB, here's a then and now which is not far off a then and 40 minutes before then Top picture is the Peace Gardens, Saturday 6 December 2008 at about 8:40 am Bottom picture is Peace Gardens, Saturday 6 December 2008 at about 9:20 am I assume the bloke in the Town Hall who gets paid for switching the New Goodwin Fountain on and off each day (to save water?) starts work at 9 o'clock on Saturday and puts it on especially for those getting married in the Town Hall on Saturday morning to have their wedding photos taken in front of it.
    1 point
  19. So here are 2 picture I took of Neepsend gas works from the south side of the river Don. The pictures are dated 1974 and 2007. They are not quite from the same location due to the total change this area has undergone, from an industrial centre to an area of total devastation and neglect. The gasometer which dominates both pictures is the same one (Neepsend gas works??). There were several steel works in front of it but the one which was chosen as the subject of the 1974 picture was Sheffield Rolling Mills, still working at the time and interestingly still rolling steel by hand,- a very ho
    1 point
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