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    Sheffield History

    Sheffield History Team


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  2. Edmund

    Edmund

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  3. paulhib48

    paulhib48

    Sheffield History Member


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      10

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      48


  4. leksand

    leksand

    Sheffield History Member


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 27/12/20 in Posts

  1. The time captured in one small paragraph, my Dad took me into the fish market on Saturday Afternoon for a plate of cockles or mussels, the place was heaving so I had to hold his hand all the time we were in there otherwise I could be swept along with the crowd, it was the only place I’ve ever seen a deer hung up ready to be butchered. All gone, Sheffield is a shadow of what it use to be, the Market is a poor substitute for what we lost. I hate the supermarkets, I would much rather see the small independent shops, grocers, butchers, green grocers, clothes shops, shoe shops, toy shops but their
    2 points
  2. I started work in 1955 at the Wicker Goods Station, Saville Street and can confirm that wagons such as these were still in very common use in the 50's. I also recall Bogies amongst them too - some I think were used by National Benzole petrol & oil company who were based at Lumley Street.
    2 points
  3. Well DaveJC , unfortunately the 48 is the giveaway and I’m 73 this year. Ive also looked at some of the pictures on the 50s thread and can well remember the bombed out buildings in the process of being rebuilt. C&A Modes always sticks in my mind as the tram stop to Firth Park was outside and is a reminder of trips from Totley to visit my grandparents. There were temporary buildings at the bottom of the Moor where it had been flattened. I watched it all being rebuilt but didn’t warm to a single redevelopment, Those blackened substantial buildings that remained and were th
    2 points
  4. This must be after the war, the film Two Men and a Girl in the last photo wasn't released until 1947. Nigel L
    2 points
  5. The answer can be found on this link: https://twitter.com/NancyFielder/status/1350788532835667972
    2 points
  6. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  7. The adjacent block was Dyson House, which was owned by the Poly.
    2 points
  8. Wow! That's got to be a now missing section of Bard Street, looking down over the top of High Street Lane. They'd be stood on a path in a bit of parkland today (or perhaps have long since slid down into the road depending on recent weather).
    2 points
  9. Seen them at work today bringing it down. Another one bites the dust.
    2 points
  10. The church with the question mark is St. Andrew's, on St. Andrew's Road, now demolished, used to go to Cubs there in the '60's. Nigel L
    2 points
  11. The European cup, once lost, wss subsequently handed in at West Bar Police Station http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8709846.stm It was the most prized piece of silverware in European club football - but one night in a pub in the West Midlands, it went missing. Twenty-eight years later the story of how two teams of police officers played to win the European Cup can finally be told. Very few people knew about the disappearance and subsequent recovery of this famous piece of football silverware in Sheffield. A secret kept for the last 28 years. In May, 1982, Aston Vi
    2 points
  12. I've never been in so don't know whether the interior is (or has been) that austere, but the patterning of the glass that the bloke is peering over appears a close match to that at the Rivelin, Under Tofts.
    1 point
  13. Full film up here on my vimeo alongside all other Sheffield Film Co-op titles https://vimeopro.com/alexglenwilson/sheffield-film-co-op digitised from original material with blessing of SF
    1 point
  14. The only happier times I can remember are before Park Square Roundabout was built 😉 !!
    1 point
  15. Great views from Smithcroft Wood / Shirecliffe Allotments. Brought back memories of the later 40's when the "White Bridge" was a popular vantage point to see the steam trains slogging up to Penistone, and to get a free long distance view of the Speedway on match nights! A further frame to the right would have revealed another popular spectator venue
    1 point
  16. https://www.picturesheffield.com/search&St_Nathanael_Church St. Nathanael's Church, Roebuck Road, Upperthorpe
    1 point
  17. Thanks. I guess I am just wondering if the owners are happy for people wandering around its grounds?
    1 point
  18. Right on the corner where Subway stands now (at the time of writing)
    1 point
  19. Yes it’s a real shame. The number of pubs alone that have gone is so sad - Even relatively recently there was still half a dozen or more open - but now (pandemic aside) there’s next to nothing. Would love to have gone there when everything was open but before my time really. It’s still a really interesting place to walk round though.
    1 point
  20. Had a walk in attercliffe earlier and took these photos with comparisons
    1 point
  21. This amateur film gives a revealing picture into top flight football in England, the old First Division, in the mid-1960s. The film shows action from Sheffield Wednesday playing at home at Hillsborough Stadium to Arsenal, possibly the match in March 1964: the Scottish centre half Ian Ure looks to be playing for Arsenal. The other two games have quite small crowds, so are probably both reserve team fixtures, possibly against Manchester United and Blackpool. These films were taken by keen Sheffield Wednesday supporter Harry Wilson of Barnsley, who also filmed around the same time the w
    1 point
  22. The downstairs part of Sheaf House accessed by the yard round the back was occupied by WH Smith Wholesale. They supplied most of the newsagents in Sheffield with newspapers and mags from there in the 60s/70s and maybe later. They also had a showroom where you could buy toys and stationery etc The postal address was : Sheaf House , Sheaf Street
    1 point
  23. The result of the above in comparison to: Obviously Google Earth as a few limitations with angles and clarity —plus differences from things like focal-length of cameras, etc, but I think it ends up pretty close so Hallam Tower is definitely a viable candidate and I'm pretty convinced the photo was taken from there.
    1 point
  24. Can confirm. Below, from a photo of 2019 of the area where they were, shows some of those yellow & black brick structures as seen in the last screenshot (with metalwork removed).
    1 point
  25. It was the centre of Hell In December 1940!
    1 point
  26. I’d sort of worked out it must be between very late 60s and late 70s and Edmunds photos verify that. I notice on the last pic that the building was Seashells cafe at the time
    1 point
  27. We watched the full monty last bit and Realised this is a still from the film!
    1 point
  28. Whoops! Yes, it is obviously Abbey Lane, I don't know why I made that error. Possibly my early onset something or other. 20 Abbey Lane: 1904 - 1911 Joseph Evans, Company Secretary (tool firm) 1907 - 1915 George Sampson & Son Auctioneers, Valuers and Estate Agents (run by Harry and Edward Sampson) Harry was secretary of the Norton Show 1920 Abbey Garage - proprietor Walker 1925 Frederick Wood proprietor of Abbey Garage 1920 - 1939 S Higton & Sons builders, joiners and contractors, run by Charles and Thomas Higton. In 1939 Thomas Higton (bricklayer) wife E
    1 point
  29. Birch Road traced a straight route northwesterly from Stevenson Road to Faraday Road and the original Crown sat at the eastern junction (of Birch & Faraday). Though the north-western end was enclosed by the works expansion noted above, and subsequent. Birch Road's earlier, full course remains evident in later maps. Bessemer Road coexisted with Birch Road whilst the latter was at its full extent (as the article you quote from suggests). As an educated guess I'd say the bulk of both roads sprang up through the early to mid 1870s. The death of Hopkinson at the premises would rather indic
    1 point
  30. I managed to sneak onto the station in the late 1970 via the cattle dock bay and used the white steps to get onto the platform. We had to sneak pass the signal box when the guy wasn't looking. It was bit more intact at that point too. It always fascinated me even to this day. I suppose it was due to the fact that it was very different to Midland Station. Being raised above ground and having the electric overhead wires running through it. The style of the buildings was different to the Midland and for someone interested in train spotting there was the possibility of seeing locos that didn't go
    1 point
  31. Well there are circa 70 in operation throughout the U.K. so there has to be a good reason why a city the size of Sheffield is unable to keep one open. Our son used to love his weekly trip to Sheffield Ski Village in the 1980’s, I recall it being both very well run and attended, answers on a postcard please.
    1 point
  32. My guess would be Balaclava Road. It's blocked off at the bottom end. The white line runs from the bottom of the ski slope, past the circle that was the gas holder and continues through the Infirmary Road Aldi. Balaclava Road is close by and the Council website shows planning permission granted for new buildings at Antiquity Ltd on this road.
    1 point
  33. The Woodside Flats were between Pitsmoor & Pye Bank Roads - the southernmost would have been roundabout where the magenta lines meet on the map section above. Looking at it again however, I think the Catholic Church spire would probably be seen virtually above the law courts when viewed from there. A bit more consideration of the sightlines (shown in blue below) suggest the photo was taken from the ground to the west (map right), though my recollection is of that being quite a bit lower than Pye Bank and I'm not sure it would be sufficiently elevated to permit the vista seen.
    1 point
  34. Hi. Some of this (if not all) was filmed in the workshops of Sanderson Kaysers on Newhall Road, Attercliffe. My dad worked there for 40+ years and was still there when filming took place.
    1 point
  35. I thought it was Councillor Munn.
    1 point
  36. I recall Manor Lodge, when there was far more of it standing, the council have a curious habit of deciding to preserve something when there’s little left of it. I further recall it having a resident couple who charged folk to show them around the remains, whilst telling fanciful tales of Mary, Queen of Scots.
    1 point
  37. Andrew's was, perhaps, the only place in our City where one could buy many of the books used at school. Yes, Lyn, another wonder of our childhood which provided us withe means to do things without the "benefit" of electronics and technology. The Methodist Bookshop was another place where "bookworms" could indulge themselves before going into Cann's.
    1 point
  38. If you go inside the hotel you can see they have preserved an inscription on a wall which if memory serves correctly details the opening of the building.
    1 point
  39. This map was posted on Twitter by the 'Picture Sheffield' website. I hadn't seen it before and thought others might be interested in browsing it. Apologies if it has been posted before. https://www.picturesheffield.com/maps.php?file=008
    1 point
  40. When I first joined this brilliant forum it was just a new thing to me and I suppose it was for the other members too, but over time the forum has developed and come of age, the appearance and general lay out is very good, I especially love the old Sheffield coat of arms, a bit of colour in these dark times does bring some comfort to my old heart.
    1 point
  41. There are some new photo's added to Picture Sheffield showing the construction of the road bridge over the Midland railway line. The first shows the scene before work, the next the bridge supports installed, the third built, with cars - the support clearly visible from the previous photo and the last shows putting in the girders to take the road.
    1 point
  42. I see two women, in the middle of the road, dodging the low-flying reindeer. More numerous than seagulls on Bridlington sea-front they were. In those days, you used to get whole flocks of them, (women shoppers and reindeer), around Sheffield City Centre at that time of year. You don't tend to see so many of either these days. Jute coal-sacks - blooming awful things to carry when soaking wet, even more so when you had a lot of slack in the coal.
    1 point
  43. I remember it well, it was twentyfive to three on a wet January day! I'd just parked my mk10 jaguar at the top of King Street. The Christmas lights are still up. The bus shelter must be leaking cos the woman at the front of the queue still has her brolly up. Either that or the wind's whipping up Angel Street and blowing into the shelter and spoiling her hairdo! The coal man with the Thames Trader has finished for the day. Walsh's is still Walsh's. :-)
    1 point
  44. According to the technical info released with the movie the locations given are:- Burbage Rocks, Derbyshire, England. Gleadless Valley, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Heavygate Road, Crookes, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Millstone Edge, Derbyshire, England. The Vine Pub, Cemetary Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Thorpe Marsh Power Station, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. Plus a couple more I noticed Tinsley cooling towers(RIP) Fox & Duck, Sheffield Road Tinsley The Country and Western nigh
    1 point
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