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  1. Hi Youdy, syrup is right, it was the Wesleyan Reform Church with a Sunday School at the back leading on to Chelmsford Street. If you would like to look at a photo which may be of interest, go to:- PICTURE SHEFFIELD -- type in the search box top right s03723 -- title 'Helping needy during Coal Strike' ok Heartshome. Edit: link added, (SHB).
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  2. It might have been a Lantern slide at one time.
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  3. I cant remember who gave me this copy from 1891 but scroll down to the deaths of August 6/7 & 8th, I just cant imagine the pain and grief that the parents of these poor children went through.
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  4. Is this it? If it is, then by the seventies it was being used as a Sunday School. I remember we got permission to use it when our Silver Jubilee party was washed out in 1977. I think it was demolished in 1981. There was another entrance on Chelmsford Street round the back. I recall it was only one story high on that side though as the ground dropped significantly down to Woodbourn Road. If this is the one, the site was about 20 yards or so from where Woodbourn Road Supertram is now, on the stadium side of the road. Paul
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  5. I decided to check local newspaper entries to see if its possible to clarify Woodbourne Rd church. The results can be seen below. Unfortunately they don't make it any clearer as Woodbourne Rd is nearly always stated to be Wesleyan Reform . My family were very much involved in Wesleyan Reform & I have spent a lot of time over past 20 years researching the Sheffield Circuit of chapels , 2 of these are in Attercliffe at Surbiton St & Orchard St but none on Woodbourne Rd. In one in 1925 the Minister is Rev E Bromage who was Minister at Bodmin St as can be seem from the 1934 article about his retirement from Bodmin St. So I can only assume that they were both WR churches but Woodbourne Rd probably changed its allegiance (possibly 1933 when they did large extensions) or when it closed possibly before 1950 Here are the detailed newspaper articles : Sheffield Woodbourne rd 19 feb 1909 WOODBOURNE ROAD WESLEYANS Last night a concert was given in the schoolroom of the Woodbourn Road Wesleyan Reform Church. Mr. W. Maltby Wilkinson occupied the chair, and the artists were: Miss Doris Wolstenholme soprano (Millhouses), Miss Clarice Simpson, contralto; Mr. W. Eyre, tenor (Chesterfield), Mr. A. Farnsworth, bass (choirmaster, Church), Miss Doris Perkins, pianist (Dore); Miss Jessie Atkins, elocutionist (Nether Edge), and Miss Amy Atkins, A.T.C.L. (accompanist). Mr, O. E. Smith gave sketches in black and white. 25 oct 1921 Large congregations attended the Band of Hope anniversary in connection with the Woodbourne Road Wesleyan Reform Church, Sheffield. Mr. C. E. Stembridge preached on Sunday morning, the Rev. E. Nicholas in the afternoon, and Councillor T. Tomlinson in' the evening. Last night the special preacher was the Rev. Dawson Parsons (Vicar of St. James'). and hymns and anthems were given by the choir. The collections totalled £9 6s. 5d, 23 sep 1925 The funeral of the wife of Mr. William Brookes. J.P., of Sheffield, will at Burngreave Cemetery this afternoon, preceded a service the 'Woodbourne Road Wesleyan Church, conducted the Rev. E. Bromage, assisted Mr. J. H. Freeboough & the Rev. E. Metcalfe (Wesleyan Union General Secretary). 11 may 1931 LORD MAYOR IN PULPIT. The Mayor of Sheffield (Alderman Harold W. Jackson), in a sermon at Woodbourne Road Wesleyan Reform Church yesterday morning, said that if we were not careful the country would be pagan in three generations. The occasion was the anniversary of the Sunday School, and the Lord Mayor said the world’s happiness depended upon the boys and girls of to-aay- Councillor Luther Milner addressed the scholars the afternoon, and in the evening Mr- Kdgar Butterfield, president of the Sheffield circuit, conduct'd the service- There were large congregations. 10 jan 1933 Woodbourn Road Extensions . At Attercliffe the Church secretary (Mr. Parkin), to mark his 25 years office, has launched a 2.000 shilling fund for the reduction of the church debt. Woodbourn Rd Church, where Mr. W. Brookes is president, has several hundred pounds in hand towards a large extension scheme which, when carried out, will complete a fine block of church properly. Sheffield Bodmin St 1 sep 1903 The marriage took place on Saturday afternoon at the Wesleyan Reform Chapel, Bodmin Street, Atteroliffe. in the presence of a large and fashionable congrogation, of Mr. Anthony Morris, youngest son of the Re James Morris, of Steade Road, Sharrow and Miss Frances Evelyn Barraclough, only daughter of Mr. Edmund Barraclough, of Attercliffe Road. The Rev. E. Bromage, assisted by the Rev. James Morris (father of the bridegroom) officiated. The bridesmaids were Miss F. K. Wain, Bakewell, and Miss G. Chapman, Atterchffe. with Mr. Albert Morris and Mr. S. H. Chapman as groomsmen. 18 sep 1933 At Bodmin Street Wesleyan Reform Church Attercliffe, the Harvest Festival service was held 18 Aug 1934 Bodmin Street Wesleyan Reform Cburch. Sheffield . One of the best-remembered names in connection with Bodmin Street Wesleyan Reform Church, Attercliffe, is that the late Rev. E. Bromage. The present church was built 1891 on the site of an earlier building erected about 80 years ago. Eight years after the new church was opened the Rev. E. Bromage was invited to become minister, and he remained at the church tor 12 years. Nearly 12 years later, after period during which the church had been without minister, Mr. Bromage returned and served for further seven years. He retired in 1929 & the church members unanimously granted him a retiring allowance. He died last December, and the crowded congregation at his funeral service was eloquent testimony of the esteem in which had been held in the district. At the present time, the is church is without a stationed minister, but it is ably served each Sunday by local preachers. Among young people valuable work the Wesleyan Reform Church, Sheffield. is being done by the Sunday School, the Christian Endeavour meetings, and the Boys’ Brigade company, which was started years ago by the late Captain Foster. The church president is Mr. G. Ancliffe, and the other officials are Messrs. A. Parkin and Ward (joint secretaries), Mr, G. Mini (treasurer), Mr. H. Hill (choirmaster), and Mr. W. Smith (organist). The Sunday School superintendents are Messrs. W. Ward and A. Parkin, with Mr. Hill as secretary and Mr. T. Lepson treasurer. The Boys' Brigade captain is Mr. Haywood. 23 Feb 1950 Lord Mayor of Sheffield and Lady Mayoress visit Wesleyan Reform Circuit's 'At Home’ at Bodmin Street Church.
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  6. Shirecliffe Heliport in action. B&W photos are 1963
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  7. Take a good look at the accompanying photo of a horse and carriage on Surrey Street, the horses, carriage, people looking look strangely very sharp focus, strange shadows from the onlookers, the carriage but the two leading horses are bereft of shadows. The surrounding street isn’t as sharp , the spare land on the left is lacking contrast as are the buildings on what was Fargate in the distance, seems this photo has been more constructed that just taken. The gas lamps are just paper cutouts by the look of them. Any one see what I see?
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  8. Yes the 12th battalion sounds familiar he managed to survive the somme , he is buried right by Hoppy woods don't know what battle was happening at the time , Somme was 1916 and he passed in jan 1918 after being wounded 2/3 months prior
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  9. AS Lysanderix points out above, there wouldn't have been a Vickers Pals Btn on it's own.
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  10. Hi, His service records are on ancestry - have you got them? I can't find anywhere with a photo though . I have had a look in Sheffield 1918 newspapers but they only give his obituary but no photo. Best wishes, John
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  11. I did a cropped down version of this view, Mama and Leonies allowed me to use one of their windows. Pity about the tree blocking the view point.
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  12. That quote was taken from Wikipedia. However it was the first British Tour of 1965. They had their first ever shows in the UK in 1963. They had four tours in 1964 of the UK. The record advert was for the second tour which ended in March.
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  13. When lived in Eckington it was a well known fact that Mick Jagger was a regular visitor to the village so as to see his Grandma who lived there. Out of respect to the lady his visits were “kept under the hat”.
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  14. This is the “ Reg “ that was Bills partner, Reg built up a reputation with his knives but I suspect it was Bill that taught him the ropes, Reg Coopers full time job when he worked on Egerton Lane was in some kind of foundry as I remember the cast aluminium handles that Bill and Reg used for commando knives were made at the place where Reg worked. If Reg is still alive he must be well into his eighties by now. The photo shows Reg meeting Sylvester Stallone, Reg was much slimmer when I knew him. NOTICE: Reg Cooper has decided to retire so therefore no bowie knives will be available from him. Reg Cooper is a Bowie Knife maker from Sheffield. Aged in his 80's, he has been making Bowie knives for as long as he cares to remember. The manufacture of Bowie Knives is now performed by a dwindling number of highly-specialised craftsmen in the city. Master craftsmen in Sheffield are called "Little Mesters", a term that has endured for many years. Little Mesters are usually single specialists who run their own businesses, in their workshops, with skills that have been passed down through the years and through the generations, often from father to son. Reg Cooper's Bowie Knives are 100% Made In Sheffield. Reg Cooper is a Master Craftsman and his products are always in high demand. Please order very early to avoid missing a deadline or a Christmas/Birthday gift. His knives are craftsman-made. Reg Cooper is always busy. Knives not in stock may take some time to be completed. Reg is ably supported in the crafting of larger knives by Sheffield's last remaining Little Mester Grinder, Brian Alcock. He carries out the main initial grinding of the raw steel bars for Reg Cooper on the large sized Bowie knife blades. Sheffield steel has a reputation second-to-none. Reg's knives are made from top quality carbon steel. These Bowie Knives are gleaming in appearance and the handles are made from a choice of materials that enhances the overall look and feel of the knives. Bowie knives are available in sizes from blades of 7 inches to a monster 16 inches with a range of handle types; Buffalo Horn, Leather, Rosewood, Stag Horn or White-Bone. The handles are polished to a beautiful appearance that sets off and compliments the knife blade. These Bowie knives feel extremely comfortable in your hand and are perfect for any hunting or country-type activity where knives are required. All Bowie Knives are supplied with a leather safety carrying sheath that can be slotted onto a belt. These knives are sharp. Reg Cooper On BBC TV BBC2's Great British Railway Journeys With Michael Portillo, originally broadcast in January 2011 and repeated frequently features Reg Cooper discussing his knife making. In January 2015 Hollywood actor Sylvester Stallone was in Sheffield for an 'Audience-With' event. Sly is a collector of knives and is knowledgeable on the subject. One of Reg Cooper's knives was donated to Mr Stallone by this web site and presented to him in person by Reg Cooper. Here's a video clip of the Sylvester Stallone Knife Presentation (avi file, 4 mins). The knife donated was a 10" Bowie Knife with Buffalo Handle.
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  15. I used to work with a William “ Bill “ Wathall at George Butlers, I can remember Bill telling me he was born in what was a debtors prison that stood roughly where the tax office stood close to where Wickes is now on Moore Street, he was a very good cutler and could carve faces on the root end of stag horn.
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  16. Leeds became wealthy in the 1700's, when Sheffield was virtually a small village. One of the main reasons was that Leeds had the Air and Calder Navigation, built in 1699, which was used as the main export route for the cotton and linen industries. Sheffield had very poor roads and no canals. The Sheffield Tinsley canal was not built until 1819. This hindered the development of Sheffied Wealth creates wealth and Leeds had a good 150 years start on Sheffield.
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  17. I used to be a great fan of my home town but, sadly nowadays ,I reckon Leeds centre beats it hands down. I can only hope that recent developments on the Moor redresses things. We do have some excellent parts of town for eating and drinking…..and I am too long in the tooth for nightlife these days so I can’t comment…but my Grandkids seem to have a good time “ night raking”. ( I wonder if that expression had something to do with night soil?)
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  18. Photograph looks right and your description sounds like the correct location https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=19&lat=53.38906&lon=-1.43462&layers=117746211&right=MapTiler
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  19. LeadFarmer. Some of the Little Norton team in this cricket match against Greenhill in 1834 are still on Little Norton Lane in 1851, including Farmer Thomas Biggin: Wheelwright Thomas Cavill: Filesmith William Shaw.
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  20. The wife he ran the Victoria with, was actually his third wife. He only had children with his first wife who died in 1896.
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  21. Sheffield Local Register 1904 : 2nd April, Woodbourn Road Wesleyan Reform Church : New building opened.
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  22. The Kellys street data tends to confirm my theory that Woodbourne Rd chapel changed from Wesleyan Reform to Methodist around 1950
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  23. The street in italics is the position it intersects the street being listed
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  24. Why does it show the church on Arras street - any ideas ?
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  25. Here are extracts from Kellys Directories for Woodbourn Road in 1933, 1957 and 1969. 1933 states Wesleyan Reform Church, 1957 and 1969 state Methodist Church
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  26. The Independents 20th November 1881 census of Sheffield churches shows the Attercliffe WR church (doesn't show exact street location but it was definitely Bodmin St) had a seating capacity of 300, with attendance of 114 at morning service & 176 at evening service. The same survey shows a Wesleyan Methodist church at Attercliffe (again no street location); it had seating for 450, 241 at morning service & 236 at evening service. Maybe this was Woodbourne Rd ? There was also a Primitive Methodist church at Attercliffe Common but this could not be Woodbourne Rd.
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  27. The Wesleyan Reform Union (WRU) remained an independent church and did not join in the Methodist Union of 1932. Don't confuse the WRU with the Wesleyan Methodist Church which was the major part of the union which created the modern Methodist Church. The key point of difference between the WRU and the Methodists is that local WRU churches have full local autonomy. It would be possible for a Wesleyan Reform Chapel to take itself into the Methodist Church, but I have no information about Attercliffe WRC.
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  28. OS map #65, c.1954
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  29. They were very popular in Leicester, there was a fan club based there. Karen left the group in 1965, she had a couple of minor hits and retired from the business in 1974 at the age of 28. For three years in the early 1960's the singer was a teenage girl from Staines called Jean Hayle. They had a guitarist called Val Talbot who formed his own trio in 1968. The comedy/rock group The Staggerlees were managed in 1966 by Bill Turner ( ex Counterbeats) An article about Tony Christie says The Counterbeats later became known as The Tony Christie Show...Christie was 21 when he joined the group. It seems to me your best chance for information might be to contact Tony Christie...he is on Twitter.
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  30. The 1925 Kelly's directory lists a "Wesleyan Reform Chapel" between numbers 93 and 119 Woodbourn Road. The 1957 Kelly's lists a "Methodist Church" between numbers 93 and 119 Woodbourn Road. Not saying the above is correct, as directories are not always 100 % accurate.
    1 point
  31. I think the attribution on Picture Sheffield to the photo being of a Wesleyan Reform church is incorrect as the WR church was on Bodmin Street (not a long way from Woodbourn Rd). Also Class Tickets issued by WR churches were different to the Wesleyan Methodist ones shown. I went to Grimesrhorpe WR church for many years & that closed September last year. I suspect Woodbourn Rd was Wesleyan Methodist but cant find any confirmation of that on the Sheffield Archives list of non-denominational churches.
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  32. Class tickets are still issued to members. See Membership and Societies and classes on the Methodist Church website.
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  33. I went to Josie's a lot between 1982 and 1985. Whilst there were some older medallion types you just avoided them. No sign of prostitution and always a great night out. Loved it totally. If you were caught with a cigarette on the dancefloor huge bouncer picked you off. But hey it wad fun and always a good night out!
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  34. The Quarterly Tickets of Membership were standard across the church - there are tickets from the USA that have the same verses for the quarter. All members of the Methodist church had their names entered in a class book (relating to the weekly Class Meeting), were put under the pastoral care of a class leader, and received a quarterly ticket of membership. John Wesley seems to have issued tickets from 1742 more details here: Methodist Class Tickets
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  35. The Darnall Relief Committee was organised on the evening of Saturday 30th March 1912. By the following Tuesday every house in Darnall had been visited. Different approaches were taken in the various areas - in the St Albans area it was bread distribution, but central Darnall opened four soup kitchens, 900 tickets (for a pint of soup) were distributed on the Sunday. The Wesleyan School distributed 200 pints, each recipient also being given a small loaf.
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  36. The church originated about 1889 in a house in Rippon street, Mr William Brookes J.P. and engineers tool manufacturer, of Woodbourn House, conducting the services. Later an iron building was erected, but an increasing congregation required more permanent premises. At 3 p.m. Saturday 12th September 1903 the foundation stone for the new church was laid. The previous Sunday Rev. W.A.Wright (the Canadian Evangelist), had conducted two initial services for the church at the Alhambra Theatre, with 1300 people present for the evening one. Rev. Wright took over pastoral oversight of the church in 1905. 17th January 1907 Rev W.A. Wright , minister of the Woodbourn Road Wesleyan Reform Church preached his farewell sermon at Darnall Public Hall, having been hounded out of office by some of the church's officials including Mr Brookes, who disagreed with him discussing social problems in his sermons. He left to carry out Mission work in Northamptonshire. July 1921 Evangelists connected with the church were conducting open air meetings with men and women on their knees in the street praying, 200 converts were claimed, amongst them numerous "reformed characters".
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  37. Wesleyan Reform Church. Sadly i've no more information.
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  38. Tom Wharton Probably Wednesdays most loyal fan is buried in wardsend cemetery you can Google his story . The headstone was paid for by a group of Wednesdayites on hearing his story
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  39. You are quite correct….the concept of a Sheffield heliport predates it’s use by Sheffield University by a few years. It was opened in 1963 to coincide With the Royal Institute of British Architectures meeting being held in the City that year……publicity for the City being a reason. Westland Aircraft of Yeovil , a company with strong Sheffield links, supplied the helicopters and the Council the site. Occasional use of the heliport was made after the meeting but no regular traffic ensued ( except for the already mentioned university geology department) Hopes for a regular link with Manchester Airport were finally dashed in September 1970 when it was revealed that the then currently available commercial helicopters, “could only fly in daylight ...and not at any height during winter months…The scheme would have to await a future generation of helicopters” ,reported Alderman Reg Munn who had attended the meetings in Manchester. Sheffield was ,in the words of Miles Thomas the 1954 Chairman of BOAC…”likely to remain an Aviation Wilderness unless it moved within a few years to become connected” . This eventually happened in 1998 …when Sheffield City Airport opened…swiftly being closed by its new owners who wished to concentrate aerial activity at Finningley ….which they had recently acquired . With recent news coming out of the Peel Group it looks as if Sheffield will remain an aviation wilderness with the threatened closure of their underused Doncaster Sheffield Airport.
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  40. We put six inch nails on the tracks and fashioned miniature swords out of them, they looked great to our eyes.
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  41. Im sure there are many memories of the old Tinsley Yard. It's heyday was slightly before my time, although I do remember going to the last few open days growing up. The Sheffield District Railway is a fascinating story. Some of it still used. Some of it left waiting to maybe one day be reclaimed and some of it wiped out. Ironically, it's been in the news this week that the Meadowhall Rd bridge may be taken down.
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  42. The yard behind the Arundel Castle Inn had several dwellings in it (see SteveHB's map). The newspapers reported the address of people living in these dwellings as being "Arundel Castle Yard". However in the 1861 census, the addresses were just described as "Yard", although they followed the entry for the Arundel Castle pub. However they were not close to Sylvester Gardens - and not really close to Sylvester Lane which was nearer. There were no house numbers quoted in 1861, but heads of households were: Mary Scott, Charles Blackburn, Jesse Johnson, John Lindley, George Dewsnap, Thomas Bowling, John Heatlie, Joseph Smith. In 1871 the address was given as Arundel Street Court 5.
    1 point
  43. Hi LeadFarmer, Park Farm was located just around the bend on the top side of the road, the farm was demolished in 1938, a house and two bungalow`s are built on the location of the farm. It looks as if the architect was paying homage to Park farm in the design of the two bungalow`s by giving both a gabled bay. I`d guess that the Postcard photograph taken by Morgan & Son was from around 1902/3, and the photograph of the girl standing by the corner of the first cottage was taken the same year, she is standing at the end of the path that takes you across to Norton Lane. Thomas Biggin was living at Park Farm in 1871, Ernest Hunstone in 1891. Here's a couple of photographs from the Picture Sheffield Collection. The one looking down Little Norton Lane was taken from the corner opposite Park farm, and a Google Earth photo of the bungalows, and map from the National Library of Scotland. https://maps.nls.uk/view/101600244
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  44. You would think that performing intimate sexual acts with Antonia de Sancha and Penelope Lyttelton would have been sufficient for this goofy toothed MP. But never to be daunted, he is now remembered for a yellow bin that is now named after him, what a man. 😁
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  45. Hi Bob and Steve, Thanks for those Postings. It's over 60yrs since that fateful night in October 1960 but those pictures brought back a lot of childhood memories. Cheers, Wazzie Worrall
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  46. Looks like Olive Grove ground with Little Sisters of the Poor, in the background.
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  47. Good call boginspro! That would bring back some fond memories of my time attending night school classes at the old College of Technology on Tudor Way (previously Arundel Street) The plumbing workshop didn't have anywhere to mash, the tutor would allow us out two at a time to take our 10 minute break at the Adelphi, remember Elvis always playing on the jukebox, we'd make jokes about it, Elvis being so uncool to teenagers in 64.
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