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  1. Organgrinder

    Organgrinder

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  2. Unitedite Returns

    Unitedite Returns

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  3. Lysanderix

    Lysanderix

    Sheffield History Member


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  4. SteveHB

    SteveHB

    Sheffield History Admin


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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/04/21 in all areas

  1. I don't know whether it's to do with the lockdown & Covid precautions and we are mainly staying at home but much of the site recently, has been taken up with photo's, videos etc of what's happening in the city centre now. Others may feel differently but I personally am not the slightest bit interested in today's modern Sheffield because I feel that the council and planners have ripped the heart out of everything this city meant to me. There was a bit of chat about the old Coles Bros etc but many seem not to care too much about the resulting demise of John Lewis and think it was t
    5 points
  2. I recall having just passed the dreaded 11 plus back in 54 and was destined for the "Redcaps". That summer, a group of us...all off to different schools in September.. decided that this would doubtless be our last summer of "playing around". ( how wrong we were) We constructed a trench system, of sorts, on Hartley Brook and spent ,what seemed like weeks, firing off masses of caps at one another. We then in a moment of inspiration diverted the meandering "Brook" and gave the old Wortley Rural District a few square yards of extra land. The semi drained WW2 static water tank was reflooded , by d
    3 points
  3. Once again, I found your video of Killamarsh Station to be fascinating, although I did find my eyes watering just a little, when I realised as to how much this scene has changed since my youth. So, I have again taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”, i.e. 1977, when this section of the line remained open, as a freight only route in order to serve collieries at Staveley. For a potted, though relatively detailed description and history of both, the station and the railway, I recommend the Disused Station Website, link below: http:
    3 points
  4. I'm afraid that I disagree with that Dave, as my family and fore bears, like all those around us, shopped in the Rag & Tag, Castle Market, and Norfolk Market Hall, all their lives without dying of food poisoning or anything similar. We didn't battle for expensive parking places as we walked from Heeley to town, did our shopping and walked home again. In the old days there were no suburban supermarkets so we did much of our shopping at our local shops but always went to town on Saturdays and at holiday times besides works lunch times. I, personally always enjoyed shopping in town
    3 points
  5. You really would have to have been born into a certain class of society and in a certain period to really appreciate the benefits of the rag n tag, Norfolk Market Hall and Dixon Lane. It wasn't about prices (which were as low as they could get), nor was it about quality (which was as varied as you chose), it was about COMMUNITY. A community that travelled together on trams and buses, not cars, that walked long distances without thinking it extraordinary, that faced hardships such as coal rationing, very long snowbound winters and basic foodstuffs and which above all related to one another. Th
    3 points
  6. As promised here is the video of my recent visit
    2 points
  7. Roarers - now for a spot of name dropping... back in the 90's I spent a day with Lord Patrick Lichfield, the photographer, and one of the tales he told me was of his time in the guards when they did just that in the drainpipes of the four or five storey barracks buildings. Made my early efforts in the local terrace houses look a bit tame!
    2 points
  8. DaveJC (above) said that in this case the cinema was named after a location which was named after a man. You are quite correct though in the general case. Wealthier people might well leave an endowment to the local church to pay a priest to say masses on behalf of their soul. The belief was that the prayers would hasten the soul's passage through purgatory and on into heaven. If you were rich enough a small chapel within the larger church could be fenced off, probably having your tomb (possibly below) an altar and enough space for the priest. When he wasn't saying masses for you, then
    2 points
  9. A platform level view of the train shed, taken in 1953 might interest a few folks. Copyright retained. For the record, the locomotives are:- Class 5MT, No.45262, of Shed No.19A, Grimesthorpe, built by Armstrong Whitworth, to Works No.1317, in 1936. Class B1, No.61224, of Shed No.50A, York North, built by North British Locomotive, Glasgow, to Works No. 26125, in 1947.
    2 points
  10. My dad had done his stint in the War and had no problem with it all. Let’s be honest everything in the 50s was talking about it or harking back to it. There were endless war films and boys comics were full of stories about beating the Jerries . Take that Fritz !! So if we weren’t out in the woods beating the Hun we were emulating our cowboy heroes who were also constantly in films or on tv. Everyday for me it was playing army or cowboys. From about 5 upwards . Throw in a kick about in the park and that was my childhood . No car, so no day trips or very few. Y
    2 points
  11. Another card by Wilson's, showing High Street, note the 'Toys' advert seen on the tram 🙂
    2 points
  12. People tracking me on the two leading Sheffield Forums will know I was a bobby in B Div before I became a journalist and broadcaster. Three years of patrolling Burngreave, St Philips, Hanover, Broomhall, and Sharrow was enough to confirm what I had learned as a kid at Sharrow from 1942 onwards.....that these communities had a solid gold centre that could not be replicated in Gleadless Valley, Mosbrough or anywhere else. On the night of the hurricane in 63 I was on night duty in the Ellesmere Road area and stayed on duty until 3 o clock the following afternoon where people were trying to salvag
    2 points
  13. I mentioned this topic to a retired Councillor friend and she reminded me that during the MASSIVE slum clearances of the 50/60s ,when whole local communities and their infrastructure were being discarded/destroyed to be rehoused in new Council estates and high rise flats, its affects on mental health was such that Sheffield had one of the highest incidences of suicide in the UK. Sheffield was, indeed, a wealthy City...in parts. It was said that outside of London our Rolls Royce dealer (Hoffman's?) sold more "Rollers" than anywhere else. That said, there was poverty...even post War and wi
    2 points
  14. From the directories. J Wilson and Son, toy and fancy dealers, 57 Fargate. 1901, 1905 and 1911. Wilson, Gumpert & Co. Ltd., toy and fancy dealers, 57 Fargate. 1925.
    2 points
  15. That’s the company that published postcard and whose name runs up the left edge. Also their logo in the top centre JW&SS. Here’s another card published by them, https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sheffield-Fargate-Edwardian-Half-Penny-Stamp-John-Wilson-Son-Postcard-/402175968921 Assume they were photographers, printers, publishers, but some clues to suggest they might have been toy importers and dealers. Also, not sure where exactly on Fargate? https://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/topic/150299-willson-and-gumpets/
    2 points
  16. Electrically powered vehicles? Bottles which are recycled? Gosh, how very old-fashioned.
    2 points
  17. Only odd because we've somewhat lost the original sense. Round about 1200 the phrase "Ȝif þou þis nelt don þou salt don worse" (If thou this not done, thou shalt do worse = If you don't do this, you'll do worse). This is the earliest example in the OED of "to do" being used in the sense of "to fare" or "to get on". A little later there is "‘We sal’, he said, ‘do nu ful wele’" (We shall, he said, do now full well) and later still "Your horsyn do well" (horses). In 1697 the phrase "There, how d'ye do now?" was recorded and by 1738 "How do you do, Tom?". You might be thought a bit od
    2 points
  18. Thank you very much for posting your video. I really enjoyed watching the same. It’s a very long time indeed since I last visited the L. D &. E. C. R., and I am both, amazed and saddened by how much this long defunct line has changed so much in the past 40+ years. I have taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”. I hope that you can relate them back to the remains and locations shown in your video. LDE001-Upperthorpe and Killamarsh Station Site, Looking North Towards Beighton-16/06/1977 LDE003-Upperthorpe and Killamar
    2 points
  19. They were probably attracted by the roundabout, giving them easy access to the Parkway 😀
    2 points
  20. 1 point
  21. I love Norfolk! I was taken, between the ages of about 3 - 15 every Spring Bank holiday to see my dad's friend from the war and his young family in nearby North Walsham. Cromer was always a favorite at the time for 'Cromer Crabs' and the fresh crab sandwiches. Also, we always stayed at Bacton, just down the coast, in a caravan, where the interest to me was the huge North Sea gas terminal they were building there and then later, the first wind turbines that I had ever seen. The other thing that excited me, were the low flying jets taking off from Coltishall, where my dad's friend worked. I
    1 point
  22. I have a 2017 Chevy Electric Car, the Bolt EV, and it has a synthetic noise generator below 14 mph, so it can be heard coming. Above that speed tire noise dominates and it sounds little different from a good modern petrol car - except on acceleration.
    1 point
  23. Thank you! 🙌 I can certainly ship to the states (have a good few ex-pat customers over there already!) and indeed worldwide! Shipping cost depends on destination and the size/weight of the total order... if you add your items to the basket and enter the destination address when prompted the website will calculate the shipping for you. 👍
    1 point
  24. That will surely be Delf St Parish of Heeley on the register All the addresses on both certificates are from S2 or S8
    1 point
  25. Delf Street, still exists, just off Midhill Road in Heeley. Nigel L
    1 point
  26. There is a Rosedale Road, off Ecclesall Road. https://goo.gl/maps/eyTHTSJRFXyknu6QA
    1 point
  27. The Javelin was a twin engined, twin seat, delta winged, all weather fighter. It was a long time in development and hardly a success.
    1 point
  28. My association with Harry is almost none existence, I would pass by in my car and that is all. However, many people I spoke to knew him as a gentle and happy man. He was a son of Sheffield who lived in a cave near Baslow. I do not know why but, when I found out that some people called the cave by a different name, I thought "NO - that is Harry's cave." and so I made this in the hope that people will watch it, leave comments under the YouTube and he, and his cave will be remembered.
    1 point
  29. Yes, but wasn't it a pity when wooden cotton reels were replaced by plastic. Nowhere to put the drawing pin.
    1 point
  30. This thread brought back some memories. I was born in '47 and had all the guns, caps and cap bombs. I also had an uncle who was a 'Little Mester' and so sported a sheath knife of bowie knife on my belt from the age of about 7 and roamed the woods behind Millhouses park cutting sticks to make bows and arrows and catapults. Strangely by today's standards, I too have never killed anyone, robbed people at gun or knife point or had any desire to do so - probably because I always knew that I'd get cuffed round the ear by a beat policeman and taken home to my parents for worse punishment!. One thing
    1 point
  31. There’s a shop on Abbeydale Road named Cole’s Corner, which was never a protected name, I’m really interested how it’s going to be used, suggestions on a postcard.
    1 point
  32. Not so sure the actual cinema is named specifically after the man himself but more after the specific area. You have Chantrey Rd, Chantrey pub. You can buy books on Chantreyland . Just a thought!
    1 point
  33. A new video by the Train driver chap shows that after the recent derailment this year at the north end of platform one, although Network Rail restored the section to the platform, they removed the link to the siding that's in the section between the first tunnel and the overbridge. Although the siding line was present the line is cut off. I remember looking over the bridge regularly at the siding and it used to have a 16 ton mineral wagon in it, full of what looked like waste that had been cleared from the line. By the look of things it looks like they still need a wagon there for that!
    1 point
  34. Hi all, I wondered if anyone knew if there was a shop called "Wilson's" in Fargate and what sort of thing it was? I have attached a postcard to my Great Nan which I have transcribed as: ***************** Miss M Beaumont 74 South Street, Moor, Sheffield Post Marked Sheffield Apr 15th 1908 Dear Maud, Just a line to say I got your letter this morning Monday. My word you are going to be busy. I hope it keeps fine for you. I could see you had been doing the attics that is the reason I write to ask if you had done. Do you like my postcards I got at Wilson's in Fa
    1 point
  35. Might also explain the expression "Gone to pot"!
    1 point
  36. The prefabs were never "home" to me, I was always in the main building in Mr Dysons class, but I remember the meals being delivered in large grey lorries with "School Meals" on the side, The food was in large aluminium drums, and was cooked off site, and delivered to all schools by lorry,
    1 point
  37. Derbyshire Lane, not sure of the date..
    1 point
  38. Michael Henry Fanshawe posted this 1950's image on Facebook which is roughly the same view
    1 point
  39. The two prefab classrooms at the back have been demolished, but the ugly 70's extension that takes up half of the rear playground is still there- although it looks like it could fall down anytime!
    1 point
  40. You raise an interesting point. Though most of our neighbours in Gleadless Avenue had been there for years (the houses were, I think, built in the 1920s), my parents were Chesterfield people and moved there only shortly before I was born, at the end of the 1940s. Certainly the Ledgers were long-established in the area: they had taken their house over from a man named Eddie Jarvis, who was a family member Yet I never felt any sense of "us and them". People just helped each other, perhaps not consciously, but because that was what you naturally did. A few days ago I was sifting through s
    1 point
  41. I understand what you are saying, but at the same time capturing photos of the redevelopment will become part of history research in the future. I'm sure we would all love to see photos of Barkers Pool (the actual pool) being constructed, or the construction of the Queens Head pub off Pond Street, or of course Sheffield Castle. At the time of that construction, it would have probably appeared quite boring, only becoming interesting in years to come. As my old history teacher used to tell us - 'What happens today, becomes history tomorrow'.
    1 point
  42. I can believe that, they were just putting their name on these projects, for future c.v.s, the present clowns in the big top they call the Town Hall, cannot stop littering, vandalism and worse of all graffiti but they can quite happily brag about the improvements to the city, I.e. closing streets to traffic in favour of cycles.
    1 point
  43. Comptons Gravy Salt and Gravy Browning on a paper bag And on the other side of the bag, Carter's Three Noughts Cough Syrup
    1 point
  44. Yes, sad indeed. I went here after nights at Roxy’s in the ‘80s as a teenager. Then moved away from Sheffield in 1988. When I moved back here in 2018, and went wandering round the now much changed town centre, it brought a smile to my face, the fact that it was still there after all this time.
    1 point
  45. Another photo, the ford is paved and as said is in good condition, this is taken from the Beeley Wood Lane side, have to try and get to the other bank and look for the track up to the toll house.
    1 point
  46. The cottage is where Middlewood Road North becomes Langsett Road South. No sign of any ford or crossing to Beeley Wood Lane on old maps though. Surely the A6102 (Middlewood Road, Langsett Road) would have been the turnpike,, as I can see T.P. along it on several old maps? Beeley Wood Lane always looks the minor road and seems to almost peter out at the point it meets Clay Wheel, becoming Clay Wheel Lane and continuing to Wadsley Bridge. https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s16156&action=zoom&pos=26&id=18891&continueUrl= Th
    1 point
  47. Gravestones and the like are becoming increasingly unlikely to be a permanant memorial to anybody. With vandalism and the weather doing the best to destroy them. However even those set up to maintain them are pressed by money concerns or issues such as keeping them tidy. Closed burial grounds of long dead people have no-one intrested in protecting them and the public (due to the connection with death) don't want to provide charitable funds to keep gravestones in good nick. As we have seen with many graveyards in inner city areas, these can be re-used as public parks for ball games etc. But the
    1 point
  48. I think I'll have my little brass epitaph engraved now, - DaveH Remembered ALWAYS NEVER forgotten Well, not for 25 years Then we will forget he ever existed. Something seems a bit wrong about that to me <_<
    1 point
  49. I went to Thornbridge in 1960 when it was almost brand new. I think the first intake would have been 1958'ish. It was completely separate from next door Birley at that time. I've just been searching round the net and I'm amazed at how little information there is. Not even a decent photo that I can find. Footnote Pupils and teachers all seemed able to get there even in knee deep snow. I don't remember schools closing for any reason in those days.
    1 point
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