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  1. Edmund

    Edmund

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    tozzin

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    LeadFarmer

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    SteveHB

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/02/21 in all areas

  1. Here are a selection of paintings by a Sheffield artist who was active in the very early 1800's, W Botham. There's not much information available but apart from the late birth date I'd say he was William Hallam Botham, born 23rd April 1790 to Eleanor and George Botham. George Botham was a Confectioner and Glass and China merchant in 1792, based at Irish Cross, selling raisins, nuts, lemons, prunes etc. In August 1797 the business was at 14 Market Place. William Botham was a fellow apprentice of Francis Chantrey when they were both at Ramsey's carver and gilder, High Street. Later, Cha
    6 points
  2. I can understand that, I once fell from off a thirty foot ladder, luckily I was on the bottom rung.
    3 points
  3. Hi Athy, I've not heard 'Like Knitting Sand' or 'Plaiting Fog...' before. When I worked for Derbyhire CC in the early 90's one of my colleagues used to say 'It's Like Knitting Fog!' She was usually referring to the complete nonsense which senior people came out with in meetings. Another expression which came out of those meetings was 'Purposeful Dithering'. I little later on another 'bright spark' came up with 'Bullshit Bingo'. Everytime somebody came out with a nonsense expression in a meeting he would tick a card and then when he had a straight line shout 'House'. Unfortunately none of
    3 points
  4. I was looking through some photos I had saved, and what a surprise, the London Road shop 🙂
    3 points
  5. Len, the pub you mention (Bagshawe Arms) is still there, and the site is relatively untouched/neglected, but its a great site for wildlife. Although the buildings are gone, you can still make out the original layout of the site today. A small section of the original road is still there, from before they made the dual carriageway, that section survives as a curved lay-by where I've marked the arrow. I believe this is where the original main entrance was?...
    3 points
  6. I was down in Sheffield a few days ago with my husband who was born there. We had some time to spare so visited the cathedral where some of his ancestors where married. On approaching the building I noticed that many memorial headstones had been laid flat and were being used as a public pavement outside the cathedral area. The general public were walking all over them and as well as damaging them the inscriptions were being eroded. Some of the headstones dated back to the middle 1700's. As a member of the public and as a family historian I am appalled. I understand that these very old hea
    2 points
  7. Actually for me it's both basic respect and not wanting to further erode the valuable engravings, pieces of our history that've miraculously managed to survive so long, even in this city-! If they have to be shifted, put them to the side and at a slight incline, but this is Sheffield; let's walk on them for H+S, forget how slippy 'stones get when it's raining.. I've always hated gravestones being used as pavement, reeks of the 'Knows the price of everything but value of nothing' mentality that corrodes beauty. Some in the Gen. Cemetery have been smashed up and used as drain edging next to pa
    2 points
  8. 2 points
  9. I live in walking distance of Norton Aerodrome and have done all my life. I took my camera there the other year and photographed the site, mainly because there has always been the threat of development and in the area to the left of the original main entrance there were still floor tiles etc where some of the buildings would have been. I've been in the loft today and found a pdf document of the history of Norton Aerodrome written by Group Capt DJ Read (Ret'd) that he sent to me a few years ago. I can't recall how I came across him, maybe on here or on Sheffield Forum? Anyway, I contacted
    2 points
  10. Okay, so, I have tried not to count the ones you have already mentioned above, and this is what I have got so far: William Lawson, '2' (Hornby) Thomas Black '49' (Bachmann, triple set with next two wagons) Tinsley Park Collieries '2241' (as above) Newton Chambers '3751' (as above) Renishaw Iron '917' (Oxford Rail) Nunnery Colliery '1574' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Geoffrey Allison) Manchester & Sheffield Tar Works '19' (limited edition, by Bachmann for Rails) Sheffield & Ecclesall Co-op 'No 13' (limited edition, by Dapol for unknown)
    2 points
  11. Quite so WE I was not very accurate with my earlier post, I would never walk over a known grave purely out of respect (nothing to do with superstition) but my only objection to walking on a gravestone/ headstone that is not over a grave is that I am eroding the inscriptions, which are historic records and I have always found to be of great interest.
    2 points
  12. I agree entirely, I don't think many people, certainly of my age, would normally walk across a grave or gravestone, but this forces them to do so.
    2 points
  13. If you look at Victorian etchings or photos of the Cathedral you can see that the headstones seem to have been always laid flat, but the Victorians laid paths among them and nobody walked on the stones BUT I think it's a case of showing a total lack of respect for the people who's names are on the headstones, to use them as paving slabs is shameful. The finest churchyard I've ever been in is Greyfriars in Edinburgh.
    2 points
  14. Yeah, marvellous. Welcome to Stevenage.
    1 point
  15. Hi everyone. THE PLANNING DEPT REJECTED THE APPLICATION TO DEMOLISH THIS HISTORIC COTTAGE AND BARN LAST YEAR, but THE OWNER HAS PUT IN AN APPEAL, SO ONCE AGAIN 'WE ARE ON A FIGHT' TO SAVE THIS 'GEM' IN MAYFIELD VALLEY. Please help! time runs out 29th March 2021 Why I ask, DID THE OWNER BUY THE COTTAGE IF HE DIDN'T WANT TO LIVE IN IT. If this gets passed, where will it stop?!
    1 point
  16. Bolsterstone Archaeology and Heritage Group's next talk on zoom will be on Wednesday 17 March, starting at 7.30pm. The title is Discovering England's Burial Spaces: How graveyard monuments reveal hidden stories. Prof. Harold Mytum (University of Liverpool) and Dr Toby Pillatt (University of York) will discuss how graveyard research allows us to understand more about the past. They will look at the ways individual stone carvers can be identified, how you can notice regional styles, how shapes and materials used for memorials change in popularity over time, and how some of the d
    1 point
  17. Sheffield General Cemetery on Cemetery Road is a good example of the council’s total lack of respect for graves and gravestones. They have dismantled quite a few monuments to form, and I quote, ‘picnic areas for families’. Having worked in Montague House in the 1990’s I can only think that the ‘families’ are joint smoking, needle dependent, glue sniffing, drunken excuses for human beings. Well there are plenty of gravestones and memorials left for them to plunder, many recording the lives of the industrialists, scholars, merchants etc, who were responsible for Sheffield Town becoming a ci
    1 point
  18. I bet they are window cleaners on the left, wouldn't be aloud today.
    1 point
  19. Looks like George William Rusling of 206 Brook Hill in 1911. In 1896 the Rusling Brothers plumbing business based at 32 Spital Hill had been dissolved and brother Charles Oakes Rusling set up on his own at 62 Spital Hill. By the time of his death in 1935 George was at 44 Leavygreave Road, though he died at 1 Rutland Park. In his spare time George was chapel steward at the Carver Street chapel and was one of the original members of the Sheffield Methodist Council. George's wife Ann helped in the shop and son George was also a plumber, in fact when George junior died in 1978 he had been a "D
    1 point
  20. I worked just around the corner, so found it very convenient, plus there were most often no queues to worry about.
    1 point
  21. A.V.E.C. (AUDIO VISUAL ELECTRONIC CONTRACTORS) LIMITED was a Private Limited Company, registration number 01598462, established in United Kingdom on the 19. November 1981. The company was in business for 24 years and 7 months. The business of the company by SIC and NACE code was "6312 - Storage and warehousing". It was "DISSOLVED VIA VOLUNTARY STRIKE-OFF" from the 18th July 2006.
    1 point
  22. Hanbidge advert from a 1929 tram & bus timetable.
    1 point
  23. Fuller's earth is a type of clay which as well as its ancient use for fulling was also used as a beauty aid and for household cleaning. It would have been a familiar site in the first half of the 20C. Therefore the saying is contrasting "this earth" (the real world) and "fuller's earth" (somewhere else, possibly a mythical place). I suspect therefore that your mother's saying translates to "I don't know where I am".
    1 point
  24. The electrified line was fully operational on 30/05/1954... delayed by several months following a problem with the new Woodhead tunnel.
    1 point
  25. Steve..... Thank you so much and what a wonderful coincidence that passing the shop is what my dad, were he still alive, would be pleased to see, a Robert's tram car....
    1 point
  26. "Brittania" ,70000 ,itself pulled a special train into the Vic hauling a trainload of dignatories for the official opening of the electrified line to Manchester!
    1 point
  27. Very sad. I can see ghosts and smell steam. I stood on those platforms many a time, I remember the electric locos, lots of 4-6-0s (probably B1s) the Britannia which came in with some prestigious train (boat train? Master Cutler?) and, on one occasion, D11 'Butler Henderson' which went through light-engine. 30 years later I taught two Butler-Henderson boys who were descendants of the great man, and I still know their aunt Lady Butler (though no one ever calls her that). What I don't remember is a "station pilot" shunter. At the Midland, 41209 and 41245 performed that duty for years; did
    1 point
  28. Probably the nickname for the house "the old palace" refers to its connection with Bishop Blythe, as in a Bishop's Palace. From Armitage's 1910 "Chantry Land": There is a reproduction of a watercolor on page 42 which is the same house that Botham painted, information about the picture reads: House, demolished probably in 1810, which stood a little to the south of Norton House. From a water-colour drawing, copied, about 1877, by the late Miss S.E. Addy, from an original in the possession of the Rev. H.H. Pearson. The copy belongs to Mr Sidney Oldall Addy, M.A., by whom permission to
    1 point
  29. This is the start of This photo shows the start of Change Alley.
    1 point
  30. Hi just to introduce myself, my name is Arthur Wild and a born and bred Sheffielder. Born in Neepsend behind Stones brewery I subsequently lived on Wybourn (rehoused after the Gale), the Manor finally finishing up on Parkhill Flats. Starting work as a timed served electrician I then joined the Royal Air Force in which I served for 22 years. I married a Doncaster girl so now I reside in Doncaster but I’m Sheffield through and through. I loved my life in Sheffield and I’m fixated with the changes both good and bad that have happened in the city. My my biggest disappointment is the
    1 point
  31. It's a gorgeous building! 😍 - The negative is from knowing it's past association with death, poverty, the misery and stigma of no choice; it's not the building itself? Imagine it's a library or town hall.. (I find 'modern'/60s style blocks to be the scary ones! The new construction in town so unnecessarily ugly and demoralising, squatting over like they're arrogantly intended to say your city's history never mattered) - My relatives share the N'Gen aversion, the spookiness that most raised in 20thC Sheffield feel about the place, though one who worked there years also liked that the grounds ar
    1 point
  32. He's as thick as two short planks! Tha can grow spuds in thi 'ear oiles ther that loppy! Es that mean e wouldn't gi thi snot offern is nooz! Thar as much use as a chocolate fireguard! Gerrup afore tha takes root! This beers as flat as a fart! It im round ears wi a piece of 4 x 2. Ther off luckin fer gusset! ( NE Derbyshire) Thers moor life in't cemetry than in this battery! It's black oer ar Bill's. Es not a full shilling! To be going on with.🧐
    1 point
  33. Hmmm, "guy" is reported from 1375 in the sense of "a guide", from the Old French "guion". Even soccer appears from the OED to be English c. 1885. It gets really annoying at times; many so-called Americanisms are actually older forms of English English. Possibly the most famous one is "gotten", which appears in Wycliffe's Bible of 1382.
    1 point
  34. I have found 14 model railway wagons (though two are different makes of the same wagon) that appear to represent real wagons owned by Sheffield Companies. But did the real life wagons actually exists? Or where they made up rather like the Redgates Wagon made by Hornby (see Redgates thread). If each of the companies represented did exist, did they use railway wagons regardless of the model status? If the wagons were real, what date period are we talking for each? The companies: 1 Nunnery 2 Ketton Cement 3 General Refractories 4 Amoco 5 Longbottom &
    1 point
  35. Sheffield Victoria Train Station in the early 1980's when it was in a bad state
    1 point
  36. it does look good but not being around when the square was first created I can’t really compare, i do think it’s a mistake leaving the kiosk that just sells vape refills and other rubbish, that should have been demolished, there’s no balance with it still being there, I just hope the powers that be can keep the alcoholics, druggies and the skate-boarders away.
    1 point
  37. Something a bit like this, I think. What was this end of Wilstrop Road appears to now be Shirland Court. Most of the other side roads have gone, and the route of Shirland Lane in the distance has changed. As it was,with the arrow giving an idea as to where the photographer was looking. Tockwith Road is the road just behind the arrow. From Map 182
    1 point
  38. Not the 60s / 70s but the birth of the Millhouses pool: The Ministry of Health sanctioned a loan of £10,500 for the pool to be repaid over 30 years. It was under construction in March 1929 and the Parks and Burial Grounds Committee agreed that admission should be free, but there would be charges for towels etc. Mixed bathing would be allowed and the pool would not open on Sundays. In June the specification was altered to make it suitable for water polo (the 6 foot deep area was increased to allow polo to be played crosswise) but it was found that the depth could not be increased from the
    1 point
  39. Taken by my father around 1962. I know because I am the toddler in the hat lol.
    1 point
  40. I once researched the two brothers who's headstone lies at the side of the Cathedral,very sad life of their father a tailor and the mother who could not read or write.
    1 point
  41. I think it's shameful too, one of my ancestors family stone is still outside the Cathedral where everyone walks across each day. The whole family including young children are or was in that grave. A few years ago when there were some protest going on and the protesters were camping in the grounds of the Cathedral you could see them throwing out the dregs of their drinks over the stones and putting their fags ends out on the stones. If all the bodies have been moved from the Cathedral church yard as suggested then why didn't they relay the grave stones right up to the Cathedral wall where
    1 point
  42. Ecclesfield St Marys used the same cost cutting method for making paths around the church. Luckily the inscriptions in the churchyard were recorded in 1959 and published in the parish magazine. Otherwise I wouldn't have found that my ancestor George Wilkinson was the town crier, and when he was buried there in 1797 his inscription read "Here lies George Wilkinson , Born and cri'd, Liv'd ninety-four years, And then he di'd". The inscription is now totally worn off the stone. It would have been better in my mind for the stones to have been re-laid face down, which would at least have a chanc
    1 point
  43. It's a similar story with most churchyards and cemeteries. Gravestones laid flat or just stacked on the walls to the grounds. At Saint John's in the Park, they have been used for paving stones and steps! Of course it makes it easier to cut the grass if they are removed. But many grave stones have been removed and smashed up. I have even seen the broken ones in Sheffield rivers! Below is an example from St John's - laid flat. Since many of the stones are made from sandstone. The acid rain and pollution from motor cars will eventually eat into the stone so the inscription is lost.
    1 point
  44. Chapeltown railway station. Now been moved to the side of the Asda.
    1 point
  45. Gleadless Common in October 1971 and January 2008 The main changes are on the left although it doesn't look it as the house and telegraph pole are both clearly the same. However the old farm (out of view) has been done up, the school fields have been barriered and beyond a whole new small estate of houses has been developed.
    1 point
  46. The train in the second picture is further forward than in the first pic. Also the wagons were not attached to the engine and look as if they are on the opposite track going in the other direction. You can also see the engine driver in the first and not in the second so it suggets that the second pic was taken after the first. Finally, and this is real geek time, the shadow from the beacon on the crossing is almost identical so the pics must have been taken within minutes if not a few seconds.
    1 point
  47. So here are 2 picture I took of Neepsend gas works from the south side of the river Don. The pictures are dated 1974 and 2007. They are not quite from the same location due to the total change this area has undergone, from an industrial centre to an area of total devastation and neglect. The gasometer which dominates both pictures is the same one (Neepsend gas works??). There were several steel works in front of it but the one which was chosen as the subject of the 1974 picture was Sheffield Rolling Mills, still working at the time and interestingly still rolling steel by hand,- a very ho
    1 point
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