Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 23/06/19 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Its a view looking east along Cleethorpe Road, Grimsby, where the tram tracks crossed the railway tracks by the side of the Royal Hotel, near the Prince Albert Gardens (now just a road name next to the A180 fly-over). Revells Dining Rooms were on Cleethorpe Road and seem to have closed around 1903. Another view here: and a map from 1933:
  2. 2 points
    With the South Yorkshire Transport Trust 2019 Open Day a few days away I been updating my lists of Surviving SYPTE and Constituents buses. Below is my listing of SJOC/STD vehicles along with those of the absorbed independents that ran into Sheffield. Surviving Sheffield (SJOC/STD) motorbuses Single-deckers 216 JWB 416 Leyland PS1 / Weymann 54 DWB 54H AEC Swift / Park Royal Double-deckers 116 OWE 116 AEC Regent III / Roe 687 RWB 87 Leyland PD2/12 / Weymann 525 1925 WA AEC Bridgemaster / Park Royal 1156 3156 WE Leyland PD2/30 / Roe (3156) 904 3904 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe (used as DIV) (D14) 1330 6330 WJ AEC Regent V / Roe 874 7874 WJ AEC Regent V / Alexander 1357 657 BWB Leyland Atlantean PDR1/1 / Park Royal (used as DIV) (227 – M120) 1148 DWB 148H Leyland Atlantean PDR2/1 / Park Royal converted to roadshow bus (748) 257 NWA 257K Daimler Fleetline /Alexander 271 OWE 271K Bristol VRT / East Lancs 287 SWB 287L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 293 UWA 293L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 296 UWA 296L Leyland Atlantean / Alexander 312 UWA 312L Leyland Atlantean / East Lancs 754 WWJ 754M Daimler Fleetline / Park Royal Ordered by STD delivered to SYPTE 836 GNA 836N Daimler Fleetline / ECW 1515 OKW 515R Daimler Fleetline / MCW (DMS style) – were to have been Alexander 1534 PWE 534R Daimler Fleetline / Alexander Double-deckers cut down 3108 CWJ 410 AEC Regent / Weymann converted to tower wagon (TW58) 4624 GWJ 724 AEC Regent / Sheffield converted to gritting/towing wagon (G54) 255 KWE 255 AEC Regent III / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (G55) 913 3913 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (M10) (OWJ 357A) 475 4475 WE Leyland PD3/1 / Roe converted to gritting/towing wagon (M52) (OWJ 388A) Double-deckers re-bodied after disposal 287 CWB 987 Leyland TD4C / Cravens ( re-bodied c1952 by Crossville with ex Salford Metro-Cammell body) Surviving Sheffield (SJOC/STD) support vehicles T47 KWJ 681 Fordson TN Tractor L42 RWE 101 Leyland Comet Lorry Surviving Booth & Fisher Motor Services motorbuses Single-deckers ---- TUH 14 Albion Nimbus NS3N / Harrington (ex Western Welsh) ---- WRA 12 AEC Monocoach / Park Royal 1086 334 NKT AEC Reliance 2MU3RV / Weymann (ex Maidstone & District) 1088 340 NKT AEC Reliance 2MU3RV / Weymann (ex Maidstone & District) Surviving Dearneways motorbuses Single-deckers 1092 AWJ 292T Leyland Leopard PSU3E/4R / Plaxton C51F (368 SHX)
  3. 2 points
    I think I can say without any contradiction that this great monument to the fallen of the Crimean war ( and the event itself) will never be re-erected again thanks to a succession of councils who have totally ignored the pleas of the historic societies of the city. Shame on Sheffield council for scattering this monument, mostly paid for by public subscription, around the city, it wasn't theirs to allow it to happen, no consultation was done as far as I know and still they sit on their hands doing nothing but destroying our old buildings to erect modern slums.
  4. 1 point
    Hi Folks, This post is now available as a podcast, if that is your kind of thing! Link to listen here - http://smarturl.it/MyLifeInTheMosh Here are Ray and The Push in Mr. Kite's Wine Bar, photo by Pete Hill. Thanks Dodger
  5. 1 point
    The one picture I wish I could see again was printed with this article in the early fifties. I wonder if any of the families mentioned has it, my grandmother was one of them mentioned we have the article but no picture.A small piece of social history. We need to take a firmer grasp of this paradox----that our very differences show our unity. It will restore our faith in ourselves; It will enable us to see (IN THE KINGS WORDS); We have not proved unworthy of our past, And we can do better in the years ahead. In skill, genius, enterprise, imaginativeness, virility, and courage we lack nothing that is needed to give us the industrial prosperity our fathers built. Every workshop in the land can give evidence of that. And who can say that court 13 watery lane, off St Philips Road, does not give the best evidence of all the continuance of the spirit which made us great. There the families have painted their humble dwellings----so humble that they are marked down for demolition. That is their proud salute to the Festival Of Britain. It is a fitting footnote, for only by the happiness in British homes can British greatness be measured. Five families paint for the festival. Court 13 Watery lane off St Philips Road Sheffield shines with new paint, the festival of Britain gesture of five families who have repainted their cottages. Inside the two roomed homes of Mrs Nellie Dixon at number two and Mr and Mrs Simmonite at number three, there are new decorations,a tiled fireplace, and a white scullery. The houses are listed for eventual demolition. After their landlord had supplied a new asbestos roof, the families got busy outside with paint and borrowed ladders. "Because we have been asked to make our homes as bright as possible for the festival" They were joined by Mrs Hilda Ford at number ten. Mr and Mrs T Hayes at number nine and Mr and Mrs J Hobson of number 91 Watery lane which is in the court. They have done the job in a fortnight. Mrs Ford a table knife cutler painting on returning from work at teatime. Mrs Dixons daughter Mrs Cooper of Martin street is another member of the team "We all get on very well together" Mrs Simmonite said last night.
  6. 1 point
    Hi Heartshome I've had a look at the trough on Google Earth! it looks like an old galvanized water storage tank albeit a big one, big cisterns like this were installed in some of the bigger houses around Sheffield, these big tanks were used in the steel works for quenching tanks and by farmer's for horse and cattle troughs. The biggest cistern I came across during my plumbing career was located in the roof tower of Endcliffe Hall, it was a huge construction made from slabs of slate held together by metal connecting rods.
  7. 1 point
    Hi boginspro. Been back Norton Lees, and had a word with the gentleman volunteer historian in Bishops House, he was most intrigued about the Trough and Pump, we went to have another look at the black pipes.One has a screw cap on so must be some sort of inspection pipe, the other is bent at an angle, the man thinks it was the old post for a sign that was cut off !? We looked around for clues as to where the exact location might have been, the road was widened, taking up quite a bit of ground from when this picture was taken, that makes it a bit more tricky. He said he would try and find out a bit more about it, and when I go again, we will have an indepth search from photo's and maps. I did call at the house on the corner,and spoke to the owner explaining about the Trough and Pump, he said he didn't know about it, and had found nothing in his garden. There are quite a few feaures where digging has been done at some point.I will let you know.
  8. 1 point
    Thanks boginspro. I know Brett Payne's website well and contributed a lot of the information on the Seaman studios. You can read my biography of the Seaman photographers here: https://issuu.com/johnmartinbradley/docs/alfredseaman I think you're right. If it was Sheffield it would be recognised by now. I'll start looking at the other towns where he did a lot of stereo photography. He went to the Photographic Convention every year from about 1888-1907 and took photographs in whichever town it was held. Thanks!
  9. 1 point
    An updated list of Surviving vehicles acquired new / second hand or loaned to SYPTE. Surviving South Yorkshire PTE motorbuses Single-deckers 80 KCR 108P Leyland National 10351/2R / Leyland (ex Portsmouth) 79 KSO 74P Leyland National 10351/2R / Leyland (ex Grampian) 11 AAK 111T Leyland National 10351B/1R / Leyland 1075 FWA 475V Leyland National NL106L11/1R / Leyland 22 KWA 22W Leyland National NL116L11/1R / Leyland 76 B976 DWG Dennis Dorchester / Plaxton (B674 GWJ) 41 C41 HDT Dennis Domino / Optare 53 C53 HDT Dennis Domino / Optare Single-deckers hired during 1981 crisis 1972 GAT 180D Leyland Panther PSUR1/1 / Roe (hired from Kingston upon Hull CT 3-4/81) Single-deckers hired for trials and evaluation 1004 GNC 276N Seddon-Lucas / Pennine (hired from GMPTE) Bendi-buses 2006 CRM 927T Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2009 FHE 292V Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2010 FWA 450V Leyland-DAB / Leyland 2013 C113 HDT Leyland-DAB /Leyland-DAB Double-deckers 377 LWB 377P Ailsa B55-10 / Van-Hool McArdle 388 LWB 388P Ailsa B55-10 / Van-Hool McArdle 1647 XWG 647T Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1655 XWG 655T Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1696 CWG 696V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Alexander 1707 CWG 707V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Alexander 1756 CWG 756V Leyland Atlantean AN68A/1R / Roe 1861 JHE 161W Metrobus DR104 / MCW 1781 JKW 281W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Alexander 1790 JKW 290W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Alexander 1831 JKW 331W Leyland Atlantean AN68B/1R / Marshall 2120 KKU 120W Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2214 NKU 214X Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2260 SDT 260Y Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2298 A298 XAK Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2317 A317 XAK Dennis Dominator / Northern Counties 1918 A118 XWE Metrobus DR104 / MCW 2414 A414 YAK Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2361 B361 CDT Dennis Domiator / East Lancs 2450 C45 HDT Dennis Dominator / Alexander –hybrid trolleybus 2457 C877 JWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2462 C882 JWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2479 D479 OWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander 2489 D489 OWE Dennis Dominator / Alexander Double-deckers hired during 1981 crisis 1964 PBC 98G Leyland Atlantean PDR1A/1 / ECW (hired from Leicester CT 3-6/81) 1938 WHN 411G Bristol VRTSL6G / ECW (hired from Lincolnshire RCC 4/81) Double-deckers hired for trials and evaluation 500 TOJ 592S Metrobus DR101/2 / MCW (hired from MCW – famous five) 530 NHG 732P Leyland Titan B15 / Park Royal (hired from Leyland – famous five) Surviving SYPTE Support vehicles M51 DSA 987 AEC Matador Recovery (previously Salford City Transport)
  10. 1 point
    In preparedness' for the South Yorkshire Transport Trust Open Day on Sunday I have been updating my lists of surviving buses with a local connection. Having now found away to convert and save these in a compatible format for this forum I can now make these available. The first can be found below and lists the survivors that were once in the fleets of Sheffield Transport Department / Joint Omnibus Committee,
  11. 1 point
    If you are looking for an event to visit this JULY, there is :- GLOSSOP CARNIVAL in Manor Park, SAT 6th & SUN 7th, with allsorts of attractions including, Live Music, Displays, Fun Fair, Mini Train Ride, Classic Cars, Tea Tent, Bar, Stalls. STANNINGTON CARNIVAL Pavillion Field, SAT 13th, Lots of Assorted Stalls to Browse, Live Entertainment, Arena Displays, Assorted Refreshments. https://www.eventyas.com/GB/Sheffield/Stannington-Carnival-2019
  12. 1 point
    FULWOOD OLD CHAPEL In the 17th Century, after the passing of the Act of Uniformity, 1662, and the Five Mile Act, 1665, the Dissenters were compelled to resort to secret meet­ings, in secluded or out of the way places, in order to worship God as their consciences dictated. Accord­ing to tradition, one such meeting place was on the Hallam moors, four miles from Fulwood. It was a farm a little way off the highway between Redmires and Stanage Pole. At this spot the Dissenters, from near and far, met at regular intervals for worship. Eventually a number of them decided to settle in Fulwood, and by the beginning of the eighteenth century there was a demand for a more convenient and centra1 place of meeting in Fulwood itself. In 1707 Fulwood Hall, a fine old farmhouse now the home of Mr. Morgan Fairest, became the property of John Fox of Sheffield Park, described as "gentleman". Under the Tolera­tion Act, 1689, which repealed most of the very harsh laws against Dissenters, licences for dissenting meeting­houses could be obtained on application to the Quarter Sessions. In 1714 John Fox, of Fulwood Hall, was granted a licence for the use of his house as a place Of Worship. Fox was a benefactor to Hollis’s Hospital, Sheffield. He also realised the value of education; he was the donor of £150 for the provision of a school for the free education of 18 poor children from Fulwood and Hallam. An inscription on a cottage, formerly the schoolhouse in School Green lane, Fulwood, still recalls his generosity. 1730 Mr. John fox gave £50 Mr Jurie Clerk gave £10 Mr W Ronksley gave £30 Mr W Ronksley gave £30 Mary Ronksley gave £20. The school closed in 1875. It was William Ronksley, friend and neighbour of John Fox, and no doubt a fellow worshipper at Fulwood Hall, and earlier on Hallam moors, who left a permanent memorial down the lane below the old schoolhouse. William died in 1724. In his will he left £400 to build “ a large and spacious chapel” for the use of Dissenters. This quaint old chapel with its attractive stone mullioned diamond-paned windows and two doors, situated in a lovely countryside, in what became known as Old Chapel Lane, now Whiteley Lane, was opened for worship in 1728. A well-built meeting house (40 feet by 30 feet) standing back in what was once its own graveyard and is now a garden, the chapel psooesses a quiet dignity and simplicity. Its proportions are excellent. Externally its appearance has hardly changed at all from the time of its erection. The door and window mouldings, also the stone of the two-feet thick walls and heavy roof witness to the care of the builders. A parsonage was added at the east end in 1754 and at some later date a schoolroom at the west end of the chapel. This later addition robbed the chapel of some of its light, since it necessitated the blocking up of two windows. The old stocks now standing in the chapel gardens were moved there when the lane was widened in 1929. Originally they stood on Birks Green, close by, and they are said to be the only examples of their kind in the Sheffield district. The interior Of the Chapel has been altered several times. At one time a fine old, pulpit and sounding-board stood against the East wall and there were high­-backed pews. Earlier still, the pulpit probably occupied the centre of the longer North wall between two small high windows which are splayed unequally to provide a maximum amount of light between them, and facing the entrance doors. The pulpit, sounding-board, and old pews have gone, having been attacked by decay and removed at the end of the last century. Their place was taken by a reading desk, standing in the middle of a platform running across the East end and by chairs for the congregation. Between the years 1951 - 1957, during the Ministry of the Rev. Fred Sokell, the Chapel was re-roofed, renovated, refur­nished and electric heating was installed. Beautiful gifts of a pulpit, communion table, chairs, rail and steps, also a porch and doors all in solid Oak with blue velvet curtains and carpet, have created an interior for worship in keeping with the exterior of the beauti­ful yet simple and dignified old building. Today, known as Fulwood Old Chapel, the building was for a long time. known in the district as " Ronksley's Chapel”. William Ronksley, the founder of the Chapel, was the son of George and Ellen Ronksley, of Fulwood. He was born in the autumn of 1650 and baptized at Hathersage Parish Church on November 3rd, 1650. It may seem strange today that inhabitants of Fulwood should go over the moors to Hathersage for marriages and baptisms, but constant references to " Fulwood " in the parish register of Hathersage, show how separate Fulwood was from Sheffield in the 17th Century. William Ronksley was educated at the old Sheffield Grammar School (founded 1604) and in 1668 was admitted to Magdalene College, Cambridge. After Cambridge he settled down as a schoolmaster at Hathersage. He later became tutor to the sons of Francis Jessop, of Broom Hall. The full story of his life is exceptionally interesting, but cannot be told here; it reveals Ronksley's interest and concern for William Bagshaw, who was ejected from his living under the Act of Uniformity and who travelled tirelessly and preached extensively. He founded most of the early Nonconformist congregations, and rightly earned the name of "The Apostle of the Peak". Ronksley was keenly aware of the disabilities under which Dissenters in the Fulwood district had suffered earlier, and under which, in a sense, they still suffered, for lack of a proper house of meeting. So it was that, in his will, he provided for the building by which he is best remembered. Ronksley's will forms, in effect, the trust deed of the Chapel. It is clearly free from any doctrinal clauses. Its only stipulation is that the Chapel is for the use of "Dis­senters from the Church of England ". In 1728, and not in 1729 which is carved on the Memorial Stone, the first Minister, Jeremiah Gill, of Sheffield was duly appointed by William Jessop, one of the trustees, and it was arranged that the interest of the endowment left by the founder should be paid to him half-yearly as long as he should remain minister. At last the Dissenters in Fulwood had a comfort­able and convenient meeting place for warship. For 30 years the Rev. J. Gill was the minister until he died in September, 1758. Afterwards the Chapel was served by Ministers of Upper Chapel until 1798. Then fol­lowed several shorter ministries until the appointment of Hugh Garside Rhodes in 1827. Before he came, however, the capital sum of £400, the entire Fulwood endowment, was lost in Fenton's bankruptcy during the Napoleonic Wars; that was in 1808. In 1811 Hunter records "the interest was very low in Fulwood ". A part of the Congregation wished for an Orthodox minister, the trustees and others of the congregation were of a different opinion. This pro­duced division and many unpleasant circumstances. However, by 1827 a fresh page in the history of Fulwood Old Chapel, and its longest ministry, opens with the appointment of Hugh Garside Rhodes. A sturdy Nonconformist of the old type, a man of strong faith arid deep convictions, Rhodes also played a public role in Sheffield 'which was long remembered. He took part in the " borough elections " joined in the agita­tion for the reform of parliamentary representation, and for the repeal of the corn laws, and was an advo­cate of popular education. His public spirit and energy were displayed during the 'cholera epidemic of 1832. He preached in the streets of Sheffield and was active in attending to the sick. One of his favourite places far preaching was the steps of the old Town Hall. In later years, he had influential friends like Samuel Plimsoll, M.P., of Whiteley Wood Hall, whose one-day-old daughter he buried in July, 1865, in the chapel yard. He was also instrumental in collecting sufficient money to build the little chapel near the Norfolk Arms Hotel., Ringinglow. After the death of Rhodes in 1873 only occasional services were held until 1878 when the Trustees rented the Chapel to the Wesleyans, at the nominal sum of one shilling per quarter, and continued to do so until the end of 1880. From that year until 1896 it was closed, and during that period it fell into decay. From 1899 to 1934 Congregationalists leased the Chapel from the Trustees. On the expiry of the lease in 1934, it was decided to re-open the Chapel as a Unitarian place of worship. Electric light was installed and the building repaired and redecorated. Sunday morning, the 6th of May, 1934, saw the little Chapel filled for the Re-opening Service, conducted by the Rev. H. J. McLachlan, M.A., B.D., Assistant Minister of Upper Chapel, Norfolk Street, Sheffield. The Rev. Alfred Hall, M.A., D.D., Minister of Upper Chapel, preached the Sermon from the Text in the fourth chapter of Joshua, " What mean ye by these stones ? " He referred to the interesting origin and history of the Chapel. A public meeting was held on the follow­ing day and a congregation formed under the charge of the Rev. H, J. McLachlan. Since that date, regular morning services have been held. In April, 1937, the Congregation sought and obtained official recognition as an affiliated Congregation to the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches. Ministers of Fulwood Old Chapel Jeremiah Gill ... ... ... ... 1728-1758 Ministers of Upper Chapel John Dickinson .. ... ... 1758-1780 Joseph Evans ... ... ... 1758- 1798 Benjamin Naylor ... ... . .. 1780-1798 Joseph Ramsblottom ... ... ... 179,8- 1802 William Whitelegge ... ... ... 1803-1810 Gilbert William Elliott ... ... ... 1811-1812 Students ... ... ... ... ... 1812-1817 John Macdonald ... ... ... 1817-1827 Hugh Garside Rhodes ... ... ... 1827-1873 Occasional Services ... ... ... 1873- 1878 Wesleyan Services .. . ... ... 1878- 1880 Closed ... ... ... ... ... 1880-1896 John Manning, M.A., and John Ellis ... 1896-1898 Congregational Services ... ... 1899-1934 Re-opened for Unitarian Services May 6th 1934 Herbert John McLachlan, M.A:, B.D. 1934-1937 David Thomas Evans ... ... ... 1937-1941 Philip Noble TindaIl, M.A., B.D, ... 1942- 1948 David Thomas Evans ... ... ... 1948-1951 Fred Sokell . ... . 19,51 - 19'60 Philip Baker Morris ... ... ... 1960-1963
  13. 1 point
    This picture is of my father, Cyril Russell (later an arts and crafts teacher at Myers Grove), and his youngest sister, my aunt Alice Russell (later Linley), probably around 1946 when my father was on leave from the army. I have assumed it is at Forge Dam, though in those days municipal rowing lakes were a plenty. He'd have been about 25 at the time and had survived North Africa and the Italian landings. He went back to Italy and Yugoslavia and spent the next three years taking up mine fields in his role as a Royal Engineers Sapper.
  14. 1 point
    www.tinsleytimeandtravel.org.uk/history.
  15. 1 point
    The small bit exposed the other day at Exchange/Blonk now more exposed.
  16. 1 point
    Fitzalan Square this morning. Nice section exposed.
  17. 1 point
    Fitzalan Square exposed Jun 2019
  18. 1 point
    The bus was repainted in 1999 back to the superb Sheffield Transport livery , to commemorate 25 years since the takeover of South Yorkshire PTE - Yes that long! (1974) - and the rather bland new livery of Coffee and Cream - which wasnt very popular at the time , although rather nostalgic now! Also Rotherham painted a double -decker to their previous livery. In 2004 a single deck Volvo (841 - T841 MAK ) was painted back into Sheffield Transport colours to commemorate 30 years! This bus was reguarly used on route 51 Lodge Moor , and a souvinir model is still available at Collectors Choice at Meadowhall or on Ebay. ( around £18 ) Again Rotherham did a single deck to thier original livery possibly Doncaster as well - although they are now painted back into First "Barbie" colours.
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×