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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/03/20 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    We’ve lost so much just for the car to get ease of travel, the councillors in the town hall at the time should have hung their heads shame, the oldest parts of the city, High Street, Cambridge Street, Backfields, Rockingham Lane etc are now a complete joke, buildings designed by Stevie Wonder.
  2. 2 points
    Pond Street Bus Station in 1947 - Sheffield City Centre Really interesting for those of us not old and wise enough to remember the buildings on the right hand side that were replaced by the likes of Cinecentre, The Fiesta, The Top Rank Club etc
  3. 2 points
    Some recent finds A lone 16 ton mineral wagon left on bay line!
  4. 2 points
    How much can you remember about Change Alley in Sheffield City Centre? What exactly was it? What buildings, shops and businesses were there? Any memories of change alley that you can share with us?
  5. 2 points
    This barn (situated on Clodhall Lane near Baslow) crops up 3 times in the film, including when Jane (Ruth's daughter) is accosted by a pair of youths (Gaz and Spike) and shortly afterwards where she's seen grappling on the floor. Its also seen silhouetted on the horizon as Ruth struggles to find cover to give birth. Sorry that there's no cinematic serenity to associate with this peaceful spot but that's the nature of the film. I watched it aged 14 when it was first aired on Sunday 23rd September 1984 and have been equally fascinated and terrified of the whole thing ever since.
  6. 1 point
    My grandad used to own a butchers shop in Sheffield name Fred Phillips going back to the 30s 40s 50s any information be most grateful
  7. 1 point
    Inside of the Adelphi pub, Arundal Street, best pub in Sheffield and a regular call for me.
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    Alcatraz was in the same building, in the 80s/90s sometime I suppose. I remember those shops from the 1960s, they've changed a lot over the years.
  13. 1 point
    The Mumtaz I remember was on Union Street, just down from the rear of the Peace Gardens. https://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s24139&pos=1&action=zoom&id=26592 Great food and was a Saturday night favourite in the 80’s, but never went to the one on Chesterfield Road....
  14. 1 point
    Another view - this time you can see Hillsborough the home of Sheffield Wednesday in the very top right hand side
  15. 1 point
    Ah thanks man, that is a very nice compliment! Take care and stay safe.
  16. 1 point
    Yes. If you go on picture sheffield and search Hidgson St. Some of them picture the house I used the live in and one includes my mother. If any admin people read this can they please tell me why I have to change my password every time I login even though the system says it has changed my password?
  17. 1 point
    Used to go in there every Saturday night in the 60's. Brilliant music from The Bill Hogan Trio with guest singers. Later becoming The Conways, a 5 piece band with Barry and Barbara Mullen as main singers. The place used to be packed solid. Was in there when we learned of President Kennedy's assassination.
  18. 1 point
    Here it is when it was The Pheasant or Pheasant Inn
  19. 1 point
    Some enlargements of air photos Stand House farm 1927 it was demolished a few years later to make room for the school. Nunnery Farm 1935 showing around it MASSIVE excavations connected with the colliery. Springwood Cottage wasn't really a farm but probably connected to the Woodthorpe Colliery. It stood near Queen Mary Road. Access was via Pit Lane.
  20. 1 point
    The fines office was down there too.
  21. 1 point
    The houses we demolished certainly have, we were responsible for most of the demolition in that area,Kent, Tillotson, Gleadless, Richards, Anns Roads down to Brammall lane
  22. 1 point
    There were bombed buildings ( shops) there after the war until site was cleared (just before 1950 I think). photo attached
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    https://picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;s14049
  25. 1 point
    The Old Blue Ball on Bradfield Road in Hillsborough This now gone pub on Hillsborough Corner used to be extremely popular before falling on hard times and then eventually closing down and is now totally demolished
  26. 1 point
    I think the Leyland PD2 on the right was new in 1954 and I believe that tram number 296 went all the way to 1960. It narrows it down a bit if I am correct.
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    Sheffield Independent 04 May 1822 Kings Head Coach Office, Change Alley.
  29. 1 point
    Sheffield Register, Yorkshire, Derbyshire, & Nottinghamshire Universal Advertiser 25 April 1794 Could Lot 1 be the four story building in the centre of the photo ?? ( Left of centre )
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  33. 1 point
    Do these scenes of Moorfoot bring back any memories for people? Do they look familiar?
  34. 1 point
    Sheffield Daily Telegraph 23 May 1932 Worst Floods for 33 Years. Mr Arthur Hartley, an off-licence holder donned his bathing costume and went into his cellar to remove his stock.
  35. 1 point
    Sheffield Daily Telegraph 28 August 1902 The Rufford Road Sewer is to small to carry away the contents that the larger sewers pour into it.
  36. 1 point
    Sheffield Daily Telegraph 23 October 1875 In Court 4 another good woman laid a foundation of bricks, Then she deposited her furniture upon the top.
  37. 1 point
    Sheffield Independent 12 July 1872 Mrs Lee had a very narrow escape. She had to wade through the water to the road and back again twice to save her children.
  38. 1 point
    Good afternoon everyone, Not sure if anyone can help, but here goes. My father house when he was a lad at 104 Bungay Street had a compulsory purchase order on it as can be seen in the London Gazette of 1946, and it duly was torn down. I am interested in how I would go about finding out what year that particular house was built? Anyone help please?
  39. 1 point
    Captain T. Jackellis (real name Ellis Thompson Jackson) was staying at 206 Gleadless Road in 1932, with the Hopkinson family (Frank was a pork butcher). Frank's daughter Betty was so impressed with the Captain that she successfully took up the trumpet. Lots more information here: http://temposenzatempo.blogspot.com/2017/03/the-king-of-cornets.html
  40. 1 point
    Under a slightly new name Lysander is back after an absence of a year or more! I visited the Wicker Cinema back in the late 1950s to see "Dunkirk" along with a French exchange student. A rather unfortunate choice of film for Pierre especially when the emphasis seemed to be how the French had let us down!
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    My son is training as a barrister, and even using his access to Statute databases we can't get the text of the Act. However below is a notice of the intention to obtain the Improvement Act, and a couple of screenshots from "Statutes of the United Kingdom etc" which only list the Acts but don't have the actual text. Finally is an explanation of the contents of the Act from November 1846.
  43. 1 point
    Thanks RLongden. I don't remember Mrs Lawson but I can add some more information. s20962 the building in the foreground with the debris on top I think was an air raid shelter built in the war. When I was young it was used as a storeroom by Burgon the grocers whose warehouse backed on to court 23. My mates and I used to climb on top of it and regularly got chased off by the storeman. We also had to walk all the way round this to get to our outside toilet which was in a row backing on to a wall behind Burgons. The young girl in the photograph is almost certainly Carol Hodder who lived at the first house which I think was court 23/3. The next house 23/2 was Mrs Clara Marshall who was a widow and had three sons all much older than me. She used to babysit us when my brother and I were small. 23/1 was the Whiteheads' there granddaughter Kay/Kate? was in the same class as my brother Mel at St Silas. t00498 You're right I lived at 123 the centre house at 125 were the Priests, I think Herbert and Mary it's his motorbike you can see on the picture with Mrs Lawson in it. At 121 were either the Furniss family or the Crossleys. Might have been the Furnisses as I vaguely remember them having a child and not long after they moved. Somewhere I have a photo of my brother's 7th birthday party (Feb 1959) which Rolin Crossley from next door came to.so they must have moved before then. t00497 we used to climb over the wall and play on the bomb site it was also used as a dumping site for old mattresses and other stuff.. There was also bomb damage on the other side of the street but no wall to climb over! s31826 Primitive Methodist Chapel we used to play on this. There was a family further up the street call West I can't remember what number. There oldest son, Geoff, who was a year or two older than me was mad about the navy/sea so this doubled as a submarine, pirate ship or warship depending in what took his fancy on the day. He had a brother called Trevor who was the same age as my brother Melvyn and in the same class at St Silas. s33116 Hodgson Strret meeting room used to go to Sunday School here but only to get enough points to get on the summer picnic! s25001 St Silas school attended this from 1954-60. Three of us from there passed our 11+ in 1960 Peter Levitt went to King Ted's, Kathleen? Moseley went to King Egberts and me to Abbeydale Boys (this was a major shock for the Headteacher Mr Hill, and me) who thought any school I went to would be Approved as I was always in trouble for something! And finally s17414 the woman with the blonde hair is my mother Violet Warrs (nee Machin). I think they moved onto the street when they got married in 1936 and lived there until we were moved in 1962 to Nottingham Cliff at Pitsmoor. I first came across this by accident my brother-in-law had been reading a book "More images of Sheffield" by Keith Farnsworth and this image is in there. There is also a picture of court 23 with the washing hanging out to dry. The other lady in the picture was Mrs Jackson who was quite elderly and frail at the time. Of course the Council in its wisdom moved her to a block of high rise flats. I can remember mum taking us to see her, she was very unhappy. The cars in the street all belonged to the Funeral Director.
  44. 1 point
    Thank you so much for all of this, which gives me a great deal to go at. Fantastic to see where My great aunts lily and mary lived (i think they were operating as a shop at No 8, certainly when their mother was arrive (she died in 1939).
  45. 1 point
    Could this be it? Picture Sheffield Co-Op
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    I came across a photo of the station concourse dated to 1969. There clearly is a kiosk here, though you can't make out the owner it clearly looks like a Smith one. Interestingly too during my research I came upon several items that have survived the demolition of the site. There are a number of notice boards from the station at the National Railway Museum. However there are no images on line of them, probably not on display either. And a signal box name plate that went up for auction and sold to an unknown bidder. And to round it all off a train spotters note book for May 1965!
  48. 1 point
    Jon performing at the Green Room on a Tramlines Sunday in 2013
  49. 1 point
    Original post might be incorrect and should be Pack Horse Inn Pack Horse Inn, No 2 West Bar, junction of Newhall Street (later became Snig Hill). Grand Theatre of Varieties, West Bar, in background Found this photo of the building - fantastic looking place!
  50. 1 point
    More on the Town Hall, including our best chance at a representation of it ! First Goslings map of 1836 (town hall is number 12) Secondly Thomas Oughtibridges view of Sheffield (town hall has a number 3 above it, immediately to the left of the Church). The view appears to be from somewhere out at West Bar, we're looking at the back of the current Cathedral. Number 2, could be the Vicarage, any other ideas? Finally a map from 1780, shows where Orchard Street got its name, also that New Street and Figtree Lane were once, one and the same place ...
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