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The Sheffield Flood


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In arguably the greatest tragedy ever to befall Sheffield — indeed one of Britain's worst disasters, in terms of loss of life — almost 250 people perished, possibly more, when a reservoir dam burst in the hills a few miles from the town, shortly before midnight on the night of 11th March 1864.

The entire reservoir is said to have emptied in only 47 minutes, as in excess of a hundred million cubic feet of water (between 600 and 700 million gallons, or two million tons weight) crashed down the Loxley and lower river valleys, destroying almost everything in its path and inflicting terrible damage to property and livelihoods in its wake.

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There are a number of flood reminders at various locations along the flood trail. A memorial plaque hangs on the side wall in St Polycarps church, Loxley Road (bottom of Wisewood Lane), in memory of the victims of that area. A similar one exists in St Nicholas Parish Church at High Bradfield. On the 'Public Footpath' leading to the current Dale Dyke Dam (see item above) stands a small memorial plaque/stone 'erected with donations from The Bradfield Historical Society in 1991': also at this location, is one of the four 'CLOB' stones which span the valley and mark the 'Centre Line Old Bank'.

At Hillsborough, The Shakespeare and The Old Blue Ball public houses have recently had symbolic plaques fixed to their walls (outside) by the Hillsborough Community Development Trust, to mark their part in the flood. At the junction of Bardwell Road with Neepsend Lane is a small brass plaque, mounted on the building wall (directly on the corner) and indicating the height that the flood water reached at that location (about 8' from ground).

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Guest Hennypenny

There are some good sites on the internet about the Sheffield Flood.

There is a fascinating account at:-

http://www.mick-armitage.staff.shef.ac.uk/...ield/flood.html

The flood claims can be searched at

http://www2.shu.ac.uk/sfca/

and Karen Lightowler who has studied the flood for a few years, has shared her research together with a list of flood victims at

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~e..._lightowler.htm

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dr stanley

I've noticed in the last couple of weeks a brand new memorial has been erected to mark the Sheffield Flood along side the River Don at Millsands.

It lists the 240 plus victims ....... what worries me, if you look carefully there is a hairline crack running the full length of the front face of the memorial, whether this is artistic licence or has a hidden meaning I'm not sure but it does'nt bode well for winter.

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Guest transit

I've noticed in the last couple of weeks a brand new memorial has been erected to mark the Sheffield Flood along side the River Don at Millsands.

It lists the 240 plus victims ....... what worries me, if you look carefully there is a hairline crack running the full length of the front face of the memorial, whether this is artistic licence or has a hidden meaning I'm not sure but it does'nt bode well for winter.

...what worries me more is the height of this stone....is this to notch the future "higher" levels that we may get?????? :unsure:

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SteveHB

..... what worries me, if you look carefully there is a hairline crack running the full length of the front face of the memorial, whether this is artistic licence or has a hidden meaning I'm not sure but it does'nt bode well for winter.

That don't look very good, And Like you state 'dr stanley' be hopes that is part of the design, or else!

I have enlarged a crop of your photo, to show the crack, hope it's OK with you?

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dr stanley

That don't look very good, And Like you state 'dr stanley' be hopes that is part of the design, or else!

I have enlarged a crop of your photo, to show the crack, hope it's OK with you?

No problems at all Steve, thanks ........ One "possibility" as to the crack in the stone, which struck me about 2 in the morning (as it does), could the crack refer to the crack in the dam wall which caused the flood? ....... seems a bit on the subtle side I know.

Any other suggestions, other than a poor piece of stone.

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Guest OLD No.12

after the traggic flood, few days later they would have been a tidy up from strunned debris every where and flood cellars with damaged items in. the town centre must have been a right mess so what happened to it all the debris.

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19 Mar 1864

Looks like lots of credits to www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk on a lot of School essays in the future huh ?

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I don't know if there's a more appropriate place to put this but -

This just came to light between the pages of an old book.

Written by school mistress Ellen Styring (My Great Aunt Nelly)

I have vague memories of her as a Victorian Spinster like character, always in long black dress with white lace collar and cuffs.

She died C1953 aged well over 100. I was in the procession of mourners and we walked to the cemetry behind her coffin which was borne by horse drawn carriage.

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RichardB

Some "Then and Now" photos and Rollo the dog too.

(School resource)

www.sheffieldcitykayakclub.co.uk/Documents/resource_pack/UDWT_Resource/9%20The%20Great%20Sheffield%20Flood.doc

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RichardB

Sheffield Flood, Mrs. Kirk of Damflask with her dog and cat she returned to rescue.

" Mrs. Kirk, with whom " Sheffield Harry" lodged, had a very narrow escape.

She had also gone to bed, but got up at once when the warning was given, and hurried out of the house and across the bridge, with nothing on but her night dress.

At this moment she recollected that her cat and dog, both favourite animals, were in the house.

She ventured back to fetch them, and returned across the bridge with the cat under one arm and the dog under the other.

She had not been out of the house more than a minute or two when the house and bridge were swept away"

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