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The Sheffield Flood


mickjj
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Thank you Edmund, I particularly like Dentons Wheel and Tilt between the cliffs - just need some "map fairies" to join in now, or I need to check SFCA for precise location (grid reference).

I'm not feeling very well at the moment, I'll get by; however I do have a GIS Technician held captive for his spare time for the next month. He's from Sheffield and his mother's a teacher (and expecting "stuff" for her pupils), so hopefully if I chuck him some crumbs now and then we can try to pull something together before March.

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Hillsborough, row of brick houses next to George Bisby’s pub, 1 st house occupied by Dyson family, last house by the Atkinsons – 16 to 18 foot above the roadway

1862 George Bisby (1864 Flood)

Malin Bridge / The Cleakum Inn

194 Holme Lane

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I'll bet this lot made some mess ! 20 gallons of turpentine, Lord only knows what some of this stuff is ... CHEMIST !!!

How big was his shop ? He'd need a place the size of Boots to get that lot in !

Didn't turpentine have medical uses at one time ?

HD

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How big was his shop ? He'd need a place the size of Boots to get that lot in !

Didn't turpentine have medical uses at one time ?

HD

Must have been well established, he was at the same premises in 1849.

Elliott John Gartside, chemist and druggist, 180 Gibraltar Street

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Failing miserably thus far to locate this :

The Midnight Cry.

A sermon preached on the occasion of the Great Calamity of the Flood of the Bradfield Reservoir.

Third Edition (1873), price 6d.

"This is an original and eloquent discourse" - The Methodist Recorder.

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George Bisby of the Cleakum Inn

I worked with Mr Bisbys great great grandson Keith Bisby, his family did own a large Cutlery firm on Portobello St at its junction with Mappin St, sadly closed and demolished years ago, Keith was works manager at George Butlers Cutlery firm at Vulcan Rd and at Ecclesfield, sadly died a couple of years ago, a lovely man.

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Failing miserably thus far to locate this :

The Midnight Cry.

A sermon preached on the occasion of the Great Calamity of the Flood of the Bradfield Reservoir.

Third Edition (1873), price 6d.

"This is an original and eloquent discourse" - The Methodist Recorder.

Copies available at:

University of Cambridge

Cambridge University Library

Cambridge, CB3 9DR United Kingdom

University of Manchester Library

Main Library

Manchester, M13 9PP United Kingdom

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John Heywood (1864)

The Sheffield Flood: Containing a Full and Consecutive Account of the Disasters Caused by the Bursting of the Bradfield Reservoir, on March 12th, 1864 : Including List of Names of the Dead and Missing.

15 pages. I know this existed, just cannot find a copy.

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For anyone interested there a talk by Peter Machan on The Great Sheffield Flood, at Bents Green Methodist Church hall, Wednesday 5th February, 7.30 to 9.30, organised by the Friends of the Porter Valley. (There's usually a small charge for non-members.)

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Coloured engravings by Martin Billing, son and Co., of Birmingham, of scenes following the Sheffield Flood (1864)
Bradfield Reservoir seen from the inside SY/473/Z9/2
Bradfield Reservoir seen from the outside SY/473/Z9/3
Chapman's House, Little Matlock SY/473/Z9/4
Tricketts' Farm House, Malin Bridge SY/473/Z9/5
Public house at Malin Bridge SY/473/Z9/6
Barker and Johnson's crinoline factory, Malin Bridge SY/473/Z9/7
Site of Hill Bridge, Hillsborough SY/473/Z9/8
Brick Row, Hillsborough SY/473/Z9/9
Remains of bridge, Hillsborough SY/473/Z9/10
Now, which of these do we have access to I wonder.
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Lot 324: A Pottery 'Disaster' Mug 1864 commemorating the Sheffield Flood of 1864, printed and coloured with scenes of Tricketts Farm House in which eleven persons were drowned' and 'The Brick Row Hillsboro' where the water reached to the height of 15 feet

Sold by Sotheby's July 18, 1995

London, United Kingdom.

Source

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The enormous mass buret down the hillsides with a dinlike the heaviest thunder, and the unbap.py cotters in the valley werp,drovvned instantaneouslytheirliOuseklroin Which they had not the Slightest e chance of mime. r The fall' &try of the Scrod spent ittelf:on-theidlittlet lying between the *lesion of the Leahy and the Rifling and the 'Neepeend ,bridge. •The -scene of devastatien • there is awful. Solid and substantial baihihiugs, workshops, roved of houses, bridges,' everything that opposed• the course of the flood,' yielded before if overwhelming All were ,whelmed beneath the mighty rush of the waters. But the loss of property, incalculable as it is at preiftnte melts into insignificance when compared with the .awful loss of humen Jilt.

Source, propably some forlorn planet off series 1 of Star Trek....

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Carding , Combing & Hackling

"Wool Blending hackles are produced for the blending of fibres to make special blends of combed tops.
We also produce Flax hackles to special order"
---------------
"Standard felting needles have tiny barbs along the length of the shaft, capturing fibres and pulling them in to carry out the felting process. The reverse needles work in just the same way, except the barbs are facing the opposite direction. This means that the fibres are pulled outwards. The results are the same, but leaves a slightly fuzzy layer on the outside of the piece. This is a wonderfull effect on its own, but it can also be useful if you intend to finish the piece by wet felting the outside
"

winghamwoolwork.co.uk

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