Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Sheffield History

The Full Monty

Recommended Posts

THE FULL MONTY

FILM LOCATIONS

opening scene - steelworks?

band come round corner @ steelworks

Canal Scene

Bacon Lane Bridge and Canal

Bacon Lane

Attercliffe

Canal Scene

Bacon Lane Bridge and Canal

Bacon Lane

Attercliffe

Steps

This is a scene when the lads are walking down to the club towards the start of the film. The steps are located between Horndean Road and Idsworth Road (location of the club).

Club Exterior

Idsworth Road

The Road To The Club

Idsworth Road

House opposite club

Idsworth Road

Club Exterior

Regency House

Idsworth Road

Firth Park Road

club toilets

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

club shot

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

another shot of the club

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

club toilets again

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

club shot again

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

sheffield city centre shot

walk up to school

Langsett School

Burton Street

Hillsborough

walk up to school

Langsett School

Burton Street

Hillsborough

schoolyard

Langsett School

Burton Street

Hillsborough

job centre

Exterior Shot - West Street

Sheffield City Centre

job club

nice house

Jogging Scene

Mount Road

Parkwood Springs

Jogging Scene

Mount Road

Parkwood Springs

Jogging Scene

Mount Road

Parkwood Springs

tinsley towers shot

sat on bank overlooking sheffield

dancing in front of car headlights !

Woodcock Travel - The Wicker

Ye Olde Coach House - The Wicker

langsett road - garage (now gone)

langsett road garage

ballroom dancing scene

another shot of sheffield

Geralds House

34 Whirlow Park Road

Whirlow

Geralds House

34 Whirlow Park Road

Whirlow

walking down the road..

Geralds House

34 Whirlow Park Road

Whirlow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also - the scene outside the school was just up from David Fords on Penistone Road - and the scene where Gerald buys the papers and dumps them in the bin is at the Newsagents on the top of Granville Road

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MORE FILM LOCATION SHOTS

office shot

back at the job club

Ruskin Park Playground

Daniel Hill Street

Blake Street walking up towards Blake Pub

The Blake Pub

Blake Street/Daniel Hill Street

Ruskin Park Playground

Daniel Hill Street

Ruskin Park Playground

Daniel Hill Street

city view

city view 2

factory

factory

les battersby auditions in the factory

another audition

audtion dance

night shot of cooling towers

meadowhall and viaduct in front

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also - the scene outside the school was just up from David Fords on Penistone Road - and the scene where Gerald buys the papers and dumps them in the bin is at the Newsagents on the top of Granville Road

My paper shop lol

The scene where they look out over Sheffield was done on Skye Edge.

Think it was this film anyway, I've only seen it once, years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Supermarket Scene

ASDA Supermarket

Orgreave Way

Sheffield

Supermarket Scene

ASDA Supermarket

Orgreave Way

Sheffield

Supermarket Scene

ASDA Supermarket

Orgreave Way

Sheffield

street shot

newsagent - street shot

takeaway - street shot

factory

house again

where is this ? (note the pub on the left)

factory

eversure textiles

shop/post office

shop/post office counter

post office worker

getting fit with the city behind

getting fit on the grass

talking on skye edge

football on the hill

football on the hill

noticeboard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daffodil Road - Sheffield 5

(thanks to danblakemore for that one)

flyposting the club

HELP NEEDED - WHERE IS THIS ?

job centre - filmed @ burton street school (capel hall)

great shot of the cooling towers

anyone know where this is ?

bus stop - outside school

Carter Knowle Junior School

bus stop - outside school

Carter Knowle Junior School

anyone know where this is ?

police station

Peveril Road

Peveril Road

34 Whirlow Park Road

Whirlow

Gaz's Flat

Regents Court

Hillsborough

Outside school

Langsett School

Burton Street

Hillsborough

looking up burton street

Langsett School

Burton Street

Hillsborough

Graveyard Scene

Crookes Cemetery

Crookes

jogging

Burger Bar

Granville Road newsagents

Granville Road

stocksbridge steels brass band

Barrack Lane - Walking Uphill

Infirmary Road/Barrack Lane

shiregreen wmc crowd

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

shiregreen wmc crowd

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

on stage at shiregreen wmc

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

gratuitous stripper shot

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

THE MONEY SHOT !!

Shiregreen Working Men's Club

136 Shiregreen Lane

Shiregreen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE FULL MONTY

Where that film title came from

The release of the film with that title in 1997 provoked requests to explain what it means and where the phrase came from. The former is easy to answer: it just means “the whole thing; everything; the whole lot”. I’d like to oblige regarding the second question, but in the present state of research it’s difficult to say anything much more definitive than “origin unknown”.

It became common in Britain from the early nineties onwards, but has only a sparse recorded history before then. The first reference I’ve come across, dated 1986, is in a book entitled Street Talk, the Language of Coronation Street (Coronation Street being a long-running British soap based on life in a northern town). The next I have is from the Guardian of September 1989:

“What we’re after is a live skeleton — the full monty,” said the stage manager.

One suggestion put forward in a newspaper article is that it was invented in the early eighties by Ben Elton, an alternative comedian, possibly after the model of the whole shebang, which has long been known in Britain, though it originated in the US. But this seems rather unlikely, because my erratic memory is insistent that the phrase was around before the eighties; this impression is backed up by several correspondents who say they heard it as far back as the 1950s. Alas, nobody can provide any documentary evidence for these dates.

It seems that there are almost as many explanations as there are writers doing the explaining. A colleague in the dictionaries department at the Oxford University Press, who has had the thankless job of writing the entry for this expression, claims to have found sixteen different stories. A few of the more common ones are:

* a corruption of “the full amount”;

* a reference to bales full of wool imported from Montevideo;

* from a TV commercial for Del Monte fruit juice, in which one of the characters insisted on the full Del Monte;

* gamblers’ jargon meaning the kitty or pot, deriving from the old US card game called monte;

* the casino at Monte Carlo, in which the full monty would equate with breaking the bank;

* Field Marshal Montgomery on parade with all his medals;

* from Field Marshal Montgomery’s liking for a good breakfast in the morning;

* being supplied by the British tailors Montague Burton with a three-piece suit; or

* being provided with a complete wedding outfit from the same firm.

The first two of these seem extremely unlikely, and the third is almost certainly a recent play on words by an advertising copywriter. The fourth, the gambling origin, is suggested by Tony Thorne in his Dictionary of Contemporary Slang. He also reminds us that monte was once a common Australian and New Zealand term in horse-racing for a good tip or certain bet. Monte is certainly long-attested in both of these senses, but there’s no firm evidence that the full monty has been derived from it, or when it first appeared, or how it got from America or the antipodes into British usage.

Field Marshal Montgomery, General Montgomery as he was during the Second World War, certainly had the nickname Monty (there was a film, you may recall, with the title I Was Monty’s Double, about a man who impersonated him). The stories about Montgomery mostly refer to his liking for a good breakfast, even in the desert during the North Africa campaign. It is said that the phrase was taken up after the War, presumably by ex-servicemen, as a name for the traditional English breakfast of bacon, eggs, fried bread, tomato, mushrooms, toast, and cup of tea. However, this is just as likely to be a rationalisation of an existing expression, but attached to a well-known public figure in the way such things often are. However, I have been told that it was in common use in transport cafés in the 1950s, so there may be something in it.

The Montague Burton story appears to be the most probable. There’s some slight support for it in that several early citations capitalise monty (though this could, of course, apply equally well to General Montgomery). The expression seems to have been in use longer in the north of England, where the firm originated: Mr Burton’s first shop was opened in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, in 1903, and by 1913 he had his headquarters in Sheffield. (This, of course, fits with the Sheffield setting of the film.) The firm became huge, with more than 500 shops by 1929, and it made a quarter of British uniforms in the Second World War and a third of the demobilisation suits.

Here’s what may be a relevant extract, linking the phrase to tailoring, from John le Carré’s The Tailor of Panama, published in 1996 (for which I’m indebted to Nick Skelton):

“What was it we were thinking of having made exactly?”

“Me? Oh, usual sort of thing. Start with a couple o’ lounge suits, see how they go. After that it’s the full Monty.”

“The full Monty,” Pendel repeated in awe, as memories of Uncle Benny nearly drowned him. “It must be twenty years since I heard that expression, Mr Osnard. Bless my soul. The full Monty. My goodness me.”

So far as I’ve been able to discover, Montague Burton never ran a dress hire business, so it is more likely that if the expression originated with them, it did so in relation to the range of suits they sold. A person who knew the business from before the Second World War told me that the firm used to offer a two piece suit as the basic option, but that for a small extra amount you could also have a waistcoat and a spare pair of trousers. Paying the extra meant that you went for the full Monty.

My own preference is for the Montague Burton origin. But that’s just an educated guess, because we don’t have enough evidence. The jury is still out on this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PLOT SUMMARY

Gary "Gaz" Schofield (Robert Carlyle) and Dave (Mark Addy) are desperate to make some money, going so far as to try stealing steel beams from the abandoned factory they used to work at. When Gaz finds out that his ex-wife wants full custody of his young son, Nathan, because he's 700 quid in arrears, Gaz has the idea of stripping to make money. He originally gets the idea from seeing Dave's wife Jean with some friends at a male strip-club, reasoning that if the Chippendales dancers can do it, so can he. Slowly, he assembles a group of similarly desperate men, including his former foreman, Gerald Arthur Cooper (Tom Wilkinson), at the factory he used to work at.

In a sequence of darkly comic scenes, various former co-workers of Gaz and Dave are made to perform a strip-tease for them as their audition. One of the auditioners is invited to stay after he flunks; he says that he still has his children in the car, and "this is no place for kids". The auditioner then glances over at Nathan, who was recruited by his father to work their stereo, before leaving. Other auditioners are hired for their penis size (both mythical, in the case of 'Horse', and real, in the case of Guy).

As the men try practicing, doubts continue to creep in about whether this is the best way to make some money, due to their individual insecurities over their appearances (Dave is overweight, for example). When the men are approached on the street by women who have heard of their show, Gaz declares that their show will be better than the Chippendales dancers because they'll go "the Full Monty" - strip all the way - hence the film's title. Dave quits less than a week before the show, deprecating himself as a "fat poopydoo" whom no one would want to see in the nude.

While practising, the rest of the men get literally caught with their pants down in the abandoned factory they use for their practice, causing one of the more unconventional chase scenes in modern film, involving most of the main characters running from their pursuers wearing orange leather thongs. Two of the strippers, Guy and Lomper successfully escape, and fall into a homoerotic embrace. The police show the men the surveillance tapes from the factory and soon the secret is out. All seems lost, with the entire city of Sheffield knowing who the members of Hot Metal are and the cast ready to quit, until the owner of the pub the men want to perform in informs Gaz that he already sold 200 tickets for their show.

With not much left to lose, and a sold-out show, the men decide to go for it for one night. Dave finds his confidence and joins the rest of the group, stripping to Tom Jones' version of You Can Leave Your Hat On (their hats being the final item removed).

LIST OF UNCONFIRMED LOCATIONS

14 Mount Road, Parkwood Springs - Gaz and Dave are jogging up the hill

The bus stop outside Carter Knowle Junior School - Gerald and Gary talking

Gerald's House

'Full Monty' House

34 Whirlow Park Road

Whirlow

'Full Monty' Park

Blake Street

Sheffield

(over the road from the Blake Pub)

Supermarket Scene

ASDA Supermarket

Orgreave Way

Sheffield

The Canal Scene

Bacon Lane Bridge and Canal

Bacon Lane

Attercliffe

Graveyard Scene

Crookes Cemetery

Crookes

Mandys Factory

Eversure Textiles

Sheffield

Langsett Music Centre

Pickering Road

Sheffield

Keep Fit sequence

Manor Oaks Road

Sheffield

Dave's House

Meadowbank Road

Sheffield

Burger Bar

Pepes

Cambridge Street

Sheffield

Lompers House

Peveril Road

Sheffield

Ruskin Park

Sheffield

Sanderson Special Steels

Newhall Road

Sheffield Boxing Centre

73 Burton Street

Hillfoot

Ski Village

Sheffield

Whirlow Park Road

Sheffield

Released

Cinema: 1997

VHS: 02 March 1998

DVD: 12 June 2000

The Full Monty - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119164/

BUY THE DVD - http://www.play.com/DVD/DVD/4-/852379/The_...on/Product.html

Do you know the exact locations where the film was shot ?

If so - please let us know - post below so we can add to the list and get some pictures of what the area looks like today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The steps

This is a scene when the lads are walking down to the club towards the start of the film. The steps are located between Horndean Road and Idsworth Road (location of the club).

http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/uploads/monthly_03_2007/post-1-1172951130.jpghttp://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/uploads/monthly_03_2007/post-1-1172951137.jpg

The Road To The Club

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Club

Also located on Idsworth Road - however only the exterior shots were done here. The interior shots including the final strip scene were done at Shiregreen Working Mans Club.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Regency on Idsworth Road where the club exteriors were shot used to be "The Roxy" cinema. It also had a ballroom and dance school underneath. My parents went to dances there when I was a nipper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've updated this thread now - with a few pictures of how the locations look now !

I'll continue updating as I snap the pics around Sheffield..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

getting fit with the city behind

We think that is in Norfolk Park

getting fit on the grass

talking on skye edge

football on the hill

football on the hill

They are all on Skye Edge, Near the Hyde Park Terrace and Walk/Manor Oakes Gardens. As you go up Manor Oakes Road and round the bend at the top there is a side road which is actually closed off with bollards, they were all up there.

noticeboard

That is at winkobank according to Dad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The factory where they get arrested is just under the bridge from Don Valley stadium Attercliffe,can't remember the name of the road.It's on the right in the grounds of Mayflower Technology.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EXCELLENT

Many thanks - I think I know where you mean

Top information

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I could never understand with the movie has to do with the grand finale. Why oh why was Tom Jones singing "You Can Keep Your Hat On" when the song itself was made famous by one of Sheffields own Joe Cocker ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 'MONTY MANIA' site went live this weekend

All the film locations and more are on the site now - check it out by clicking the link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick one to say a huge thanks to Julie for getting in touch with us via the Monty Mania website !

She's a superstar in her post office - she still works there - and hopefully we can persuade her to be interviewed for the website !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The steps

This is a scene when the lads are walking down to the club towards the start of the film. The steps are located between Horndean Road and Idsworth Road (location of the club).

http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/uploads/monthly_03_2007/post-1-1172951130.jpghttp://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/uploads/monthly_03_2007/post-1-1172951137.jpg

The Road To The Club

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SCENE:

STEELWORKS BRASS BAND WALKING

Unless I am very very much mistaken that scene was shot where I walked (with many others) every day of my life for a few years during the 1970's.

It is/was the yard at Sanderson Kaysers on Newhall Road, Attercliffe

I have seen the movie a few times and each time I am more convinced, unfotunatly I have lost touch with all my old work colleagues, so have no way of confirming it - but I am really sure thats where it is

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's roughly where I went the other day to get exterior shot of the policeman walking past the factory ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The shot of the telephone box with a weird domed building is taken from the junction of Heeley Bank Road / Olive Grove Road...

Very roughly as I have not lived in Sheffield for 20 years and memory isn't as good as it was.

That is the council road grid storage / loading place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bang on - this has been confirmed by others too

I can't wait to get all the shots done and on the montymania website - it's been a huge project (I only thought it would take a few hours) and I can't wait to see it all done

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi new to this but i understand ...being a local ....that the nude over the garden wall shots were actualy done in back gardens of Ford street ..with camra sited on Dobbin hill looking down over row of back gardens ...then swiches to Peveril Road as they climb in window as it had staircase / decor they wanted ...i belief ..(to be confirmed ) that the back gardens were not suitable at Peveril Road...but i stand to be corrected .

Also just a bit of info ... Burton Street Old school was used for film ...they thought they were going to get a paint job done for them ...but to cut costs ....the main Hall was painted to different colours to shoot 2 parts of film .1/2 the hall for the dancing scean ...the other for the heart to heart in classroom ...i believe ..i ...it was literaly split in half and camra would be in middle of hall just showing which bit they wanted ... actualy went to a meeting there and was told ...very bizar

Zoro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×