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Stuart0742

Board Schools of Sheffield

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Posts about these schools are cropping up in various topics, as VOX suggests "Is it time to record these before they disappear"

This text is taken from another topic which quickly went off at a tangent

http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/i...ost&p=43611

Extract :

Sheffield has one of the best surviving collections of early board schools in England, unparalleled outside London. Following the 1870 Education Act, Sheffield’s newly elected School Board vigorously set about constructing new schools, completing 39 before its demise in 1903. Charles J. Innocent (1839-1901) was appointed architect to the Board and he, together with his partner, Thomas Brown (c. 1845-81) were responsible for 19 of the 22 schools built between 1873-1881. The first of them and, it was claimed by the architects, the first commenced under the 1870 Act, was Newhall School, Sanderson Street. By 1877, attendance at the new schools had reached 31,000.

When invited to open Park School in 1875, the Liberal MP David Chadwick remarked

"How in the name of fortune the School Board have persuaded the ratepayers of Sheffield to tolerate their extravagance in spending £100,000 in the building of 14 or 15 schools as substantial as so many castles!".

Newhall School, Sanderson Street (earliest)

Fulwood (1878)

Langsett Road (1879)

Woodside, Rutland Road (1880)

Burgoyne Road (1881)

Duchess Road (1883)

Huntsmans Gardens (1884)

Sharrow Lane (1887)

Abbeydale (1890)

Gleadless Road, Heeley (1892)

and Hunters Bar, Sharrow Vale Road (1893).

http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/citie...rd-schools.html

http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/citie...and-design.html

So 1st lets make a definitive list

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Posts about these schools are cropping up in various topics, as VOX suggests "Is it time to record these before they disappear"

This text is taken from another topic which quickly went off at a tangent

http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/i...ost&p=43611

Extract :

Sheffield has one of the best surviving collections of early board schools in England, unparalleled outside London. Following the 1870 Education Act, Sheffield’s newly elected School Board vigorously set about constructing new schools, completing 39 before its demise in 1903. Charles J. Innocent (1839-1901) was appointed architect to the Board and he, together with his partner, Thomas Brown (c. 1845-81) were responsible for 19 of the 22 schools built between 1873-1881. The first of them and, it was claimed by the architects, the first commenced under the 1870 Act, was Newhall School, Sanderson Street. By 1877, attendance at the new schools had reached 31,000.

When invited to open Park School in 1875, the Liberal MP David Chadwick remarked

"How in the name of fortune the School Board have persuaded the ratepayers of Sheffield to tolerate their extravagance in spending £100,000 in the building of 14 or 15 schools as substantial as so many castles!".

Newhall School, Sanderson Street (earliest)

Fulwood (1878)

Langsett Road (1879)

Woodside, Rutland Road (1880)

Burgoyne Road (1881)

Duchess Road (1883)

Huntsmans Gardens (1884)

Sharrow Lane (1887)

Abbeydale (1890)

Gleadless Road, Heeley (1892)

and Hunters Bar, Sharrow Vale Road (1893).

http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/citie...rd-schools.html

http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/citie...and-design.html

So 1st lets make a definitive list

Extra to these are

Manor Lane 1876

Springfield 1875

Netherthorpe 187*

There must be more

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Netherthorpe School

Netherthorpe St

The usual Stonework, unfortunately damaged

I would say it is 1873

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Netherthorpe School

Netherthorpe St

The usual Stonework, unfortunately damaged

I would say it is 1873

Netherthorpe School from Netherthorpe Rd

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When invited to open Park School in 1875 (not on the list ?), the Liberal MP David Chadwick remarked

"How in the name of fortune the School Board have persuaded the ratepayers of Sheffield to tolerate their extravagance in spending £100,000 in the building of 14 or 15 schools as substantial as so many castles!".

-------------------------

St Mary's, South Road, Fir Street, 1873 - best guess, the is a date stone on Fit Street side of the building if anyone is passing, Thanks.

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Gleadless Road School, Heeley (later re named Anns Road School then Anns Grove, before it's closure)

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Gleadless School on Hollinsend Road was opened in April 1898, the School Board having taken over the running of the old Gleadless Church School in 1895. There is a photo by DaveH in the "Gleadless Pictures" topic.

Can't help noticing this in one of the links (http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/cities/sheffield/sheffield-board-schools/planning-and-design.html ) in the first post of this topic:

"Other local architects also carried out work for the School Board including Holmes & Watson, Hemsoll & Paterson and W. J. Hale"

Presumably these two worked on the Elementary Schools he he

I'm putting my coat on.

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Gleadless School on Hollinsend Road was opened in April 1898, the School Board having taken over the running of the old Gleadless Church School in 1895. There is a photo by DaveH in the "Gleadless Pictures" topic.

Can't help noticing this in one of the links (http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/cities/sheffield/sheffield-board-schools/planning-and-design.html ) in the first post of this topic:

"Other local architects also carried out work for the School Board including Holmes & Watson, Hemsoll & Paterson and W. J. Hale"

Presumably these two worked on the Elementary Schools he he

I'm putting my coat on.

I have previously looked fior a date stone on this school and can't find one, - unless it has been covered by that more modern brick extension.

There isn't one of those fancy stone carvings either.

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Lowfield School on London Road is another Board School: is the date stone 1874? Not entirely clear form Google Streetview

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I have previously looked fior a date stone on this school and can't find one, - unless it has been covered by that more modern brick extension.

There isn't one of those fancy stone carvings either.

Dave I have come across the same problem with Heeley Bank School (1880)

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Dave I have come across the same problem with Heeley Bank School (1880)

That's going to make it difficult to decide if ALL these schools originally had that stone carving, or if some of them never did.

Certainly when the attractive and fairly valuable stone carvings are coming up for sale, and have clearly been removed from their original site just to flog them for a quick profit, that's only going to make answering this question much more difficult.

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Lowfield School on London Road is another Board School: is the date stone 1874? Not entirely clear form Google Streetview

Here you are MA, it is 1874.

The building of Lowfields School started in 1872,

but due to building problems it was not completed until a couple of years later.

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Image Courtesy of Google SV

Walkley Board School has the usual stonework, it can be seen on the website link

Hint Hint :)

Needs a visit to photograph and check for datestone

Wilco - now on list :)

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Walkley Board School. Innocent & Brown - 1874

Now named Walkley House (Student accommodation) and addressed as Burnaby Crescent.

Burnaby Crescent was called Greaves Street on the 50's OS map

Link to OS Map 236

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Also Intake School Mansfield Road.

Some of the old pine class cupboards had the board school plaque inside them.

Intake was built in 1884

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Also Intake School Mansfield Road.

Some of the old pine class cupboards had the board school plaque inside them.

Intake was built in 1884

This one being a Handsworth Board School:

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This one being a Handsworth Board School:

Interestingly there's a blue plaque on the end of the building which says Mansfield rd formally Main Road

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Pye Bank School, Andover Street

I went to Pye bank school and am pretty sure that it has a date carving which says "School Board then a date (Can't remember what it was) that part of Andover Street was always known as School Board Hill.

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I went to Pye bank school and am pretty sure that it has a date carving which says "School Board then a date (Can't remember what it was) that part of Andover Street was always known as School Board Hill.

Hi darra,

the date looks to be 1875

View Larger Map

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Hi darra,

the date looks to be 1875

View Larger Map

that looks so different,it used to be surrounded by high rise flats, shops and maisonettes.

Edited by Stuart0742
HTML enabled to show Google SV

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