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Sheffield History

Sweets and Chocolate bars of the past !

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Guest bangtidy

Bon bons were a sort of lump of toffee covered with a very loose coating of white icing sugar powder.

Isn't Bon Bon French for good good?

I believe it is DaveH

Yes your correct bon bon is good good in french

très bon - very good :)

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DaveH

I believe it is DaveH

Yes your correct bon bon is good good in french

très bon - very good :)

But is that how they get their name?

Are bon bons actually French sweets or of French origin?

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RichardB

Isn't monkey nuts just another name for peanuts?

But the ones that are still in their shells.

Probably get their name "monkey nuts" from the old saying about employment, -

"If you pay peanuts you only get monkeys"

Implying that if you offer poor pay then you are only likely to be able to employ poor, unskilled workers.

I just wanted to say Monkey Nuts really lol

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syrup

What about Liquorice Twigs used to be available in all sweet shops

now only in Herbalists.

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Guest bangtidy

But is that how they get their name?

Are bon bons actually French sweets or of French origin?

Bonbon is also the term used in French and German for a candy or sweet.

(french) bonbonniere = candy box

A great number of words of French origin have entered the English language to the extent that many Latin words have come to the English language. Most of the French vocabulary now appearing in English was imported over the centuries following the Norman Conquest of 1066, when England came under the administration of Norman-speaking peoples. According to different sources, between one third and two thirds of all English words have a French origin.

the word is definetly french, but im sure the bonbons (candy) i eat was english DaveH :rolleyes:

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syrup

No one seems to have mentioned Refreshers what happend to them.

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DaveH

Bonbon is also the term used in French and German for a candy or sweet.

(french) bonbonniere = candy box

A great number of words of French origin have entered the English language to the extent that many Latin words have come to the English language. Most of the French vocabulary now appearing in English was imported over the centuries following the Norman Conquest of 1066, when England came under the administration of Norman-speaking peoples. According to different sources, between one third and two thirds of all English words have a French origin.

the word is definetly french, but im sure the bonbons (candy) i eat was english DaveH :rolleyes:

Nous mangeons les bonbons anglais.

Mais en ce monde moderne ils pourraient avoir été importés de n'importe où.

Quelques ingrédients seront certainement d'origine étrangère.

Peut-être même Français lol

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DaveH

No one seems to have mentioned Refreshers what happend to them.

No idea what happened to them syrup.

Refreshers were a sort of different pastel coloured, flavoured solidified into a lozenge form of sherbert.

They fizzed in your mouth a bit, but not as much as powdered sherbert.

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Guest bangtidy

No one seems to have mentioned Refreshers what happend to them.

Refreshers were lovely and sour in the middle the powder bit

Also what about Cherry lips

Blackcurrant and liquorice

Cola Cubes

Midget gems

Wine gums

Just a few of my favourites

Also DaveH was a good point you made, this is interesting read about french history of sweets ;

http://french-windows.blogspot.com/2007/01...-si-bonbon.html

The best way to remember your wife's birthday is to forget it once.

- E. Joseph Cossman

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RichardB

Moon Dust (1970's) - expoded in yer mush.

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DaveH

What about Liquorice Twigs used to be available in all sweet shops

now only in Herbalists.

The production of liquorice in Britain seems to happen only in 2 places, one in Scotland and the other in Yorkshire based around the town of Pontefract (hence the famous liquorice "Pontefract Cakes")

The twigs were more than likely from Pontefract or at least of Yorkshire origin.

Of course a fair bit of liquorice must have come down to Sheffield to Bassetts where Bertie Bassett and his team made the famous local sweets, Liquorice Allsorts.

How could we forget them :blink:

Bassetts used to be a sponsor of Sheffield United and would walk around the pitch at bramall Lane just before kick off at home games throwing handfulls of free Liquorice Allsorts up into the crowds.

Liquorice being sold by herbal stores is probably being used as a laxative to cure constipation, and as anyone who has ever eaten more than their fair share of the stuff in one go, or a full box of Liquorice Allsorts at a time will tell you, it is very effective. :huh::blink: :o

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Guest bangtidy

The production of liquorice in Britain seems to happen only in 2 places, one in Scotland and the other in Yorkshire based around the town of Pontefract (hence the famous liquorice "Pontefract Cakes")

The twigs were more than likely from Pontefract or at least of Yorkshire origin.

Of course a fair bit of liquorice must have come down to Sheffield to Bassetts where Bertie Bassett and his team made the famous local sweets, Liquorice Allsorts.

How could we forget them :blink:

Bassetts used to be a sponsor of Sheffield United and would walk around the pitch at bramall Lane just before kick off at home games throwing handfulls of free Liquorice Allsorts up into the crowds.

Liquorice being sold by herbal stores is probably being used as a laxative to cure constipation, and as anyone who has ever eaten more than their fair share of the stuff in one go, or a full box of Liquorice Allsorts at a time will tell you, it is very effective. :huh::blink::o

Yes I was thinking the other day about Bassetts and came across this link:

http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/Former...s-at.1811665.jp

Sounds terrible and I prefer the Les cadbuarys fingeries DaveH :)

Everybody should believe in something; I believe I'll have another drink.

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DaveH

Yes I was thinking the other day about Bassetts and came across this link:

http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/Former...s-at.1811665.jp

Sounds terrible and I prefer the Les cadbuarys fingeries DaveH :)

Everybody should believe in something; I believe I'll have another drink.

Asbestos in the sweet factory, :o does that mean asbestos in the sweets <_<

I think "Cadburys Fingers" are likely to soon become "Kraft Fingers" :(

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Guest wayneybabes

not sheffield, but if anyone is holidaying in yarmouth this year call into yesteryear on the main sea front, pay £6 to go on the tour and just before the tour ends you come across the below shop that sells loads of old sweets like sweet tobacco etc

an old poster inside the shop

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DaveH

A well known local manufacturer of quality chocolate, toffee and confectionary.

About 30 years ago I taught a member of the Thornton family.

She was brought to school and taken home in a Rolls Royce

Must have been a very successful business then ;-)

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Guest suzy

A well known local manufacturer of quality chocolate, toffee and confectionary.

About 30 years ago I taught a member of the Thornton family.

She was brought to school and taken home in a Rolls Royce

Must have been a very successful business then ;-)

Was it a sweetie Rolls Royce made out of chocolate with toffee wheels??? he he Note to Self : must eat chocolate for breakfast so as not to get cravings mid-morning!!

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DaveH

Was it a sweetie Rolls Royce made out of chocolate with toffee wheels??? he he Note to Self : must eat chocolate for breakfast so as not to get cravings mid-morning!!

No, thats not Thorntons style.

They are very much into the upmarket quality chocolate market rather than novelties.

I have recently had a very nice selection of pure samples of "chocolates of the world"

and also a box of what could easily have passed as Belgian chocolates.

Note to Self : I'm sure that diabetic nurse said to go easy on the chocolate :unsure:

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RichardB

Was it a sweetie Rolls Royce made out of chocolate with toffee wheels??? he he Note to Self : must eat chocolate for breakfast so as not to get cravings mid-morning!!

I was going to say we need more Victorian sweets on here, the ones with opiates, poison and other narcotics, it would appear that we had then and Suzy has scoffed the lot lol

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DaveH

The production of liquorice in Britain seems to happen only in 2 places, one in Scotland and the other in Yorkshire based around the town of Pontefract (hence the famous liquorice "Pontefract Cakes")

The twigs were more than likely from Pontefract or at least of Yorkshire origin.

Of course a fair bit of liquorice must have come down to Sheffield to Bassetts where Bertie Bassett and his team made the famous local sweets, Liquorice Allsorts.

How could we forget them :blink:

Bassetts used to be a sponsor of Sheffield United and would walk around the pitch at bramall Lane just before kick off at home games throwing handfulls of free Liquorice Allsorts up into the crowds.

Liquorice being sold by herbal stores is probably being used as a laxative to cure constipation, and as anyone who has ever eaten more than their fair share of the stuff in one go, or a full box of Liquorice Allsorts at a time will tell you, it is very effective. :huh::blink::o

Bertie Bassett, a local hero?

So which was your favourite Allsort?

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Stuart0742

Bertie Bassett, a local hero?

So which was your favourite Allsort?

Bertie now works for Kraft then, :(

I have 2 favourites the round ones covered in coconut and the ones covered in little balls

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DaveH

Bertie now works for Kraft then, :(

I have 2 favourites the round ones covered in coconut and the ones covered in little balls

Is that the little boy blue balls or the little girly pink balls?

Note, there were 2 different coloured ones covered in this little balls, - with an interesting baby gender choice of colours.

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Stuart0742

Is that the little boy blue balls or the little girly pink balls?

Note, there were 2 different coloured ones covered in this little balls, - with an interesting baby gender choice of colours.

I don't bring colour into any decisions, purely taste

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DaveH

I don't bring colour into any decisions, purely taste

But did both colours of essentially the same sweet taste the same?

Did the different colours carry different flavours?

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Stuart0742

But did both colours of essentially the same sweet taste the same?

Did the different colours carry different flavours?

Don't think so, the liquorice taste tends to dominate allsorts

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