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vox

Cobbled Streets

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vox

Does anybody know if there is any sort of Council policy to maintain these streets without further use of the dreaded Tarmac?

If there isn't there should be.

And I know the £££ reply which I might get, but one could apply that to any maintenance. IE. "It's too expensive to do it properly."

They don't seem to be averse to laying new areas of block paving etc around the city.

Do they plan to make repairs to these with Tarmac when the time comes?

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ukelele lady

Now that's got me puzzled, UL. I seem remember the old Post Office being on Hillsborough Rd and it was dead flat. Could this be Hillsborough Place?

Just a thought.

Hi Tsavo

This is Hillsborough road the old post office was across from those white vans, it is now a curtain and

dress material shop. I'm not sure where Hillsborough Place is, do you mean Taplin road or Proctor Place maybe?

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SteveHB

Hi Tsavo

This is Hillsborough road the old post office was across from those white vans, it is now a curtain and

dress material shop. I'm not sure where Hillsborough Place is, do you mean Taplin road or Proctor Place maybe?

A Google Street View link to Hillsborough Road should help tsavo .. Here

Hillsborough Place is the 'one way' at the top of Hillsborough Road,

also a link to OS map #241

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Stuart0742

This photo looks quite rural on a sunny day like today, but where is it? It did not always look as tranquil as this

No its not a quiz, just to see if anybody recognises where it it is. Sure Steve will :)

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Guest tsavo

Hi Tsavo

This is Hillsborough road the old post office was across from those white vans, it is now a curtain and

dress material shop. I'm not sure where Hillsborough Place is, do you mean Taplin road or Proctor Place maybe?

I think it was the apparent hill that threw me. I assume the photo looks towards Middlewood Rd if the old Post office is on the right?

By the way, Hillsborough Place crosses the end of Hillsborough Rd and joins Holme Lane. Thanks for the update. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

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SteveHB

This photo looks quite rural on a sunny day like today, but where is it? It did not always look as tranquil as this

No its not a quiz, just to see if anybody recognises where it it is. Sure Steve will :)

Not very far from here ..

neer mind cobbled streets, take a look at the cobbled paths.

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vox

This photo looks quite rural on a sunny day like today, but where is it? It did not always look as tranquil as this

No its not a quiz, just to see if anybody recognises where it it is. Sure Steve will :)

I don't know why this sprang to mind, but I recon it's here. It's not anywhere I've been on, but something about the back of the stone building and the lie of the land suggested it to me.

Just had a look on Google Street View to check.

Reason for edit - Still can't seem to get the picture to go where I want it.

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Stuart0742

I don't know why this sprang to mind, but I recon it's here. It's not anywhere I've been on, but something about the back of the stone building and the lie of the land suggested it to me.

Just had a look on Google Street View to check.

Reason for edit - Still can't seem to get the picture to go where I want it.

Just to confirm, it is the remains of Granville Ln off Shrewsbury Rd.

http://www.picturesheffield.com/jpgh/s02658.jpg

Heres the view in less "Green" days

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ukelele lady

I think it was the apparent hill that threw me. I assume the photo looks towards Middlewood Rd if the old Post office is on the right?

By the way, Hillsborough Place crosses the end of Hillsborough Rd and joins Holme Lane. Thanks for the update. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

No this is looking up towards Hiillsborough Place, the old post office was across the road from the white vans.

If you look on Google street map at the fabric shop you will see the old post box near the doorway of the

shop, although painted green.

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SteveHB

No this is looking up towards Hiillsborough Place, the old post office was across the road from the white vans.

If you look on Google street map at the fabric shop you will see the old post box near the doorway of the

shop, although painted green.

So it is,

would never have noticed that.

Google SV image

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SteveHB

Another one from the Park area.

Gilbert Street, between South St and Sheaf St.

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SteveHB

A bit off topic but thought I'd stick this one in ..
a cobbled Street, cobbled pavement and crozzle topped wall.
It's in the Park area taken around 1960,
could it be South Street, looking down on Sheaf Street?
Or maybe it's nearer to Broad Street.

(sorry the quality of the photo isn't brilliant)

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SteveHB

Same area (Park),

and it looks like Granny long pants is giving that pegged rug a good fettling .. :)

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vox

One of my favourite Cobbled Streets in S2,

very much unchanged over the years.

Stuart0742 should know this one .. ?

Will post more tomorrow.

Image from Google Street View

I was working here on Midland Street again today and noticed these studs set into the cobbles.

There are five of them marked with P and a makers mark - BBS Stainless Pat No 290328

Not very clear picture because of the sun.

They can't be to do with parking, they're right on the junction.

I've searched the patent number but can't make any sense.

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Guest tsavo

I think your mention of the junction is pretty much on. These would have been the junction stop markers....nowadays marked with white paint.

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DaveH

I think your mention of the junction is pretty much on. These would have been the junction stop markers....nowadays marked with white paint.

What about the layout of them?

2 into the road from the kerb to a third "corner" one and then 2 down the road along its length.

I would have thought that P stood for parking (can't think of a P word that means Stop / Halt / Give Way)

P in a triangle (usually a warning sign) could mean NO PARKING in the marked off area.

This is backed up by the presence of the much more modern double yellow lines on the same section of road.

I don't know? What do you think?

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SteveHB

What about the layout of them?

2 into the road from the kerb to a third "corner" one and then 2 down the road along its length.

I would have thought that P stood for parking (can't think of a P word that means Stop / Halt / Give Way)

P in a triangle (usually a warning sign) could mean NO PARKING in the marked off area.

This is backed up by the presence of the much more modern double yellow lines on the same section of road.

I don't know? What do you think?

Sorry tsavo but I have go with Dave on this one,

at the other end of Midland St there is a lone triangular stud set in the cobbles.

It's outside the P.O.

Google SV

Also it can be seen in my photo.

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Guest tsavo

The reason behind my thinking was that it used to be (probably still is) illegal to park within the road junction markings. Mind you, this is going back to the days when you had to park over-night with a red light to the rear of a vehicle and a white one to the front. We used a small lamp that was clipped to the driver's door window, often leading to a flat battery on winter mornings, and if you parked the wrong way round the local bobby gave you a warning!

Dave is probably right about this though.

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vox

I can sort of see what you both mean, but to my way of thinking:

Tsavo

I do remember when studs were used as road markings but, if these mark the Stop line, they're well short of the junction. Also the studs would have covered a complete side of the road. (same as the white lines do nowadays.)

Dave

I sort of want to agree but

Why put studs to say don't park here (near the junction that is) when as you can see from this picture, they stop well short of the junction it'self?

Another thing - The letter P's are facing the wrong way for that side of the road.

I think there's got to be more to it.

My cousin was a copper in the 50's-60's he may remember.

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vox

I think I may have the answer.

Dave suggested that - P in a triangle (usually a warning sign) could mean NO PARKING in the marked off area.

Having slept on it for a few houres I think that rather than marking the area where you can't park, it's more likely to mark where you can.

The box formed by the 5 studs would mark the end of the permitted area. An imaginary line would join with the same arrangement at the other end of the street.

I know it's a bit near the junction but, at the time they were put in place, traffic and parking wouldn't have been so heavy as it is now.

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SteveHB

Just been in Shoreham St. P.O. at the bottom of Midland St,

I asked Mike who is the Postmaster about the triangles,

he promptly replied “parking bays”

Jokingly followed by “to park your horse & cart in”

lol

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vox

Just been in Shoreham St. P.O. at the bottom of Midland St,

I asked Mike who is the Postmaster about the triangles,

he promptly replied “parking bays”

Jokingly followed by “to park your horse & cart in”

lol

good result :)

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DaveH

Just been in Shoreham St. P.O. at the bottom of Midland St,

I asked Mike who is the Postmaster about the triangles,

he promptly replied “parking bays”

Jokingly followed by “to park your horse & cart in”

lol

Be nice if we could put it to the test.

Leave a horse and cart parked up there and see if some traffic warden tries to give us a ticket because we are on the double yellow lines.

I love little known exceptions and bits like this from the highway code.

The rules concerning the use of traction engines on the road are full of little gems like this.

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vox

Be nice if we could put it to the test.

Leave a horse and cart parked up there and see if some traffic warden tries to give us a ticket because we are on the double yellow lines.

I love little known exceptions and bits like this from the highway code.

The rules concerning the use of traction engines on the road are full of little gems like this.

Related Question:

What is the meaning of double yellow lines painted on the road?

Answer:

Not necessarily No Parking at any time.

Although normally taken to mean so, the lines actually mean Read the nearby notice.

There was (and may still be) an example of this in Dore Village where the notice allowed parking on some double yellows on Sundays.

I'll have a look sometime to see if it's still the same.

Reason for edit: This from The Highway Code

Waiting restrictions

Double yellow lines mean no waiting at any time, unless there are signs

that specifically indicate seasonal restrictions.

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