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Sheffields Flora and Fauna


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OK so a heron on the top of a tree 2 gardens away isn't that clear, although it is definately a heron from its distinctive appearance.

However, here is another picture of a heron taken a couple of years ago on the ponds at Graves Park which it shares with a variety of ducks and geese.

While at Graves park in their rare breeds centre, always visit at springtime in order to witness new births like this baby lamb

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Kingfisher on the River Don next to Norfolk Bridge. As fish now thrive in our rivers and Canal, so do the birds that rely on them for food.

She's back!   W/E.

The plant I know as traveller's joy (old man's beard is another name for it, properly known as clematis vitalba) en mass near Broughton Lane bridge, August 2019.

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While at Graves park in their rare breeds centre, always visit at springtime in order to witness new births like this baby lamb

Or even these baby piglets under their incubation lamp

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  • 1 month later...
Bayleaf

The bluebells were out in Limb Valley this morning...

and an upmarket tribe of Injuns (sorry, Native Americans!) at Whirlow Farm!

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The bluebells were out in Limb Valley this morning...

and an upmarket tribe of Injuns (sorry, Native Americans!) at Whirlow Farm!

In the modern Politically Correct world the word INDIAN is a typical abbreviation straight out of the United States,

It stands for INDigenous Inhabitant of the American Nations!

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  • 3 weeks later...
joeninetee

With an estimated total of over two million trees, Sheffield has more trees per person than any other city in Europe. It has over 170 woodlands (covering 10.91 sq mi/28.3 km2), 78 public parks (covering 7.07 sq mi/18.3 km2) and 10 public gardens. Added to the 52.0 square miles (134.7 km2) of national park and 4.20 square miles (10.9 km2) of water this means that 61% of the city is greenspace.

Roughly a third of Sheffield lies in the Peak District National Park (no other English city includes parts of a national park within its boundary), and Sheffield often boasts of being Europe's greenest city, a claim that was reinforced when it won the 2005 Entente Florale competition. This was helped by the fact that Sheffield contains over 150 woodland spaces and 50 public parks

SHEFFIELD is one of only four areas to receive national praise for its efforts to keep the air clean. (2007)

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With an estimated total of over two million trees, Sheffield has more trees per person than any other city in Europe. It has over 170 woodlands (covering 10.91 sq mi/28.3 km2), 78 public parks (covering 7.07 sq mi/18.3 km2) and 10 public gardens. Added to the 52.0 square miles (134.7 km2) of national park and 4.20 square miles (10.9 km2) of water this means that 61% of the city is greenspace.

Roughly a third of Sheffield lies in the Peak District National Park (no other English city includes parts of a national park within its boundary), and Sheffield often boasts of being Europe's greenest city, a claim that was reinforced when it won the 2005 Entente Florale competition. This was helped by the fact that Sheffield contains over 150 woodland spaces and 50 public parks

SHEFFIELD is one of only four areas to receive national praise for its efforts to keep the air clean. (2007)

For those of us who live here this is well known, that we have a clean, green City.

For those who have never been to the City, but do actually know of its existance, history and world renown its suprising how many still imagine it as a dirty, grimy, polluted industrial hell hole that turns out steel by the ton at the expense of any health or environmental concerns.

This is one fallacy that it seems very difficult to overcome. Because outsiders percieve the City in this way they are reluctant to come here and find out for themselves that we are not like that at all and in fact are one of the cleanest and greenest Cities in Britain.

The people working in local tourism can't have a very easy job trying to encourage people to come here while these myths about the City persist.

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Wire Mill Dam last week. 4 fishermen on one bank, one heron on the other!

So thats

4 disgruntled fishermen, 1 very smug heron and no bloody fish!!! :angry:

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Not really wildlife I know, but I couldn't resist these two characters at the alpaca farm at Ringinglow!

Perhaps we should have a caption competition? :)

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SteveHB

Not really wildlife I know, but I couldn't resist these two characters at the alpaca farm at Ringinglow!

Perhaps we should have a caption competition? :)

:)

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  • 4 weeks later...

Big Nose!

Where did you spot this prize specimen Steve?

(Or as my dad would have called a first class example of wildlife, a "fag card specimen", dating back to the days when packets of cigarettes often contained collectable cards on a wide variety of different topics, the aim being to collect the full set. Two popular topics were Butterflies and British Birds, - hence the expression)

Just wondered where it was as big crows like this are often solitary rather than flock and frequently turn up in unexpected places in cities to scavenge for food.

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SteveHB

Where did you spot this prize specimen Steve?

(Or as my dad would have called a first class example of wildlife, a "fag card specimen", dating back to the days when packets of cigarettes often contained collectable cards on a wide variety of different topics, the aim being to collect the full set. Two popular topics were Butterflies and British Birds, - hence the expression)

Just wondered where it was as big crows like this are often solitary rather than flock and frequently turn up in unexpected places in cities to scavenge for food.

You know the location well Dave,

it's taken in Norfolk Park, in the background is the Limes Avenue (off to the R/H side leads to Norfolk Park Rd)

The strange thing is that... recently on way back home from the park.

myself and the dog got attacked by a Crow!

I have a photo somewhere,

just need to dig it out from amongst the thousands.

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You know the location well Dave,

it's taken in Norfolk Park, in the background is the Limes Avenue (off to the R/H side leads to Norfolk Park Rd)

The strange thing is that... recently on way back home from the park.

myself and the dog got attacked by a Crow!

I have a photo somewhere,

just need to dig it out from amongst the thousands.

So Norfolk Park really is a dangerous place to go then.

If you don't meet up with a gang of teenage yobs you could still get attacked by the crow :o

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Guest Gramps

We were lucky enough to have a pair of Woodpeckers breed near the garden this year.

First photo is of a adult bringing a newly fledged chick to the 'feeding station'. I didn't get the focus quite right on this one.

Second photo is of a chick on it's own. We don't see much of them now the chicks have flown the nest but the adults were at the feeder every five minutes for days before they fledged.

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We were lucky enough to have a pair of Woodpeckers breed near the garden this year.

Very lucky Gramps.

I have only ever seen woodpeckers in the north east of England (Northumbria) whilst on holiday and have never seen them this far south.

But to have them breeding and bringing young chicks to your feeder, great! Hope they stick around for you to enjoy their presence.

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Guest Gramps

Thinking about it I'm not sure about the luck. We have about an acre of woodland at the side of the house, mostly Scots Pine, Rowan and Birch. Me and the dog were it's only visitors but we lost the dog last September and I haven't been in there since. Perhaps we disturbed the Woodpeckers too much.

We have lost a lot of wildlife in this area, the foxes have all emigrated to surburbia for an easier life and the farmers have destroyed the habitat of ground-nesting birds. I've seen more dead badgers in roadside ditches than I've seen alive in the last few years.

The hares seem to be doing well and we have the occasional stoat sniffing out the mice in the garden.

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Thinking about it I'm not sure about the luck. We have about an acre of woodland at the side of the house, mostly Scots Pine, Rowan and Birch. Me and the dog were it's only visitors but we lost the dog last September and I haven't been in there since. Perhaps we disturbed the Woodpeckers too much.

We have lost a lot of wildlife in this area, the foxes have all emigrated to surburbia for an easier life and the farmers have destroyed the habitat of ground-nesting birds. I've seen more dead badgers in roadside ditches than I've seen alive in the last few years.

The hares seem to be doing well and we have the occasional stoat sniffing out the mice in the garden.

Seems like quite a big collection of wildlife in your woodland, - but as you say times seem to be changing for the worse as far as rural wildlife habitats are concerned.

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Seems like quite a big collection of wildlife in your woodland, - but as you say times seem to be changing for the worse as far as rural wildlife habitats are concerned.

Little bit of local flora this time.

In our garden the foxgloves (Digitalis purpuris) have self seeded and have grown particularly well this year, some of them reaching record heights, much taller than me and taller than some sunflowers.

The taller one in this picture is just over 7ft 3in tall

This can be more clearly seen in this shot taken closer up, I had to point the camera upwards to get the top of the flower in as the perspective here shows.

In close up the flowers are "fag card specimens", very attractive and perfectly formed. I Enjoy having flowers like this in the garden

Even better, moving on to some wildlife, these bell shaped purple flowers are excellent for attracting bees.

Bees are having a rough time at the moment, there are fewer of them around as a parasite seems to be wiping them out. A lot of beekeepers are having problems keeping a full active hive and honey production per hive is lower. The flowers attract them and they do a bit of pollenating for us in the garden in exchange for which they take away some nectar to help increase that honey production.

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  • 2 months later...

Just off Ecclesall Rd by the looks of it, I had not heard of it either ...Link

Thanks Stuart, looks like it's round about here then.

I will have to take a wander down one morning

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Thanks Stuart, looks like it's round about here then.

I will have to take a wander down one morning

It has just been on Look North, did not really show where it was, just the frogs being caught

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