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Bridge Street Bus Station

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In the centre of the old photo is the bus shelter where I would catch the no.110 (later re-numbered 10) to Parson Cross.

Obscured by the bus is the old toilet block and the left hand gable end was the shop where my mum would buy me a packet of nibits (if I had been good)

Happy, happy days!

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In the centre of the old photo is the bus shelter where I would catch the no.110 (later re-numbered 10) to Parson Cross.

Obscured by the bus is the old toilet block and the left hand gable end was the shop where my mum would buy me a packet of nibits (if I had been good)

Happy, happy days!

So you had happy days in those smelly open air toilets did you lol

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I spent many days as inspector in Bridge St, the wooden hut office!! had one chair and a telephone, plus a book with running times, all mod cons! it was usually full of drivers inbetween trips, and the thick blue cig smoke could be cut with a knife, a small portion at the rear of the "shed" had a vending machine, the coffee? from this, if spilt, could be buffed up to a good gloss varnish like finish, god knows what it did to the stomach.

Some of the runway outside still had cobblestones, in winter and wet weather, many a bus made a skiddy pull up just outside, it was a miracle the hut survived for as long as it did.

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I spent many days as inspector in Bridge St, the wooden hut office!! had one chair and a telephone, plus a book with running times, all mod cons! it was usually full of drivers inbetween trips, and the thick blue cig smoke could be cut with a knife, a small portion at the rear of the "shed" had a vending machine, the coffee? from this, if spilt, could be buffed up to a good gloss varnish like finish, god knows what it did to the stomach.

Some of the runway outside still had cobblestones, in winter and wet weather, many a bus made a skiddy pull up just outside, it was a miracle the hut survived for as long as it did.

Regarding the coffee. I amongst others must have drunk gallons of it over the years, I wonder how many of us are still left to tell the tale? mind you, all that cig smoke we breathed in on the buses may have been the antidote. Vending machines took over from the tea wagons around 66/67, Percy one of the redundent wagon drivers went on to become one of Sheffields first traffic wardens. W/A.

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The "tea wagon" was one of my all abiding memories, on a cold winter's day it was a welcome sight in Commercial St or Fitzallan Square, a lovely dripping cake with plenty brown gravy bits, and a pint pot of steaming hot tea, what more could you ask for?

And then Castlegate canteen, if you were lucky enough to be there when the famous flaky pastry jam pasties had just come out of the oven, absolutely scrummy, burning your chin as hot strawberry jam oozed down it, phew, the memories!

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Two more of the old bus loop. The one on the right is another J.R. Wrigley picture.

I remembered something about the old Bridge Street bus station in the late 1950's that might give you a smile.

One day after work, I was going with a friend to his house at Grenoside for tea. At that time, the Grenoside buses had a funny schedule. There was one bus at something like 5:40 pm and the the next bus was 6:15 pm. Obviously, everybody made for the earlier bus as nobody wanted to be hanging around Bridge Street for half an hour. Of course there was always the last minute Charlies who came rushing down Snig Hill. Sometimes they were so later that the bus had already left the terminus, made the turn that brought it up to the Snig Hill/West Bar junction and was waiting for the policeman on point duty (no traffic lights then ) to wave him through. All the buses then were rear loaders so it was easy to hop-on, even when it was sitting in the middle of the road.

My friend and I had made the early bus and were sitting on the back seat upstairs talking to the other passengers. On a bus like the Grenoside route, everybody knew everbody else and apparently the regular evening topic was always the same. Which of these habitual later comers was going to cut it so fine that the bus was about to pull out on to West Bar.

On that particular night, the bus was already out of the station, had made the turn and was waiting for the policeman to wave us out on to West Bar. It was then that one of the other exclaimed: "God !! look at him run". Down Snig Hill came this lad in his late teens moving like the wind. I have never seen any body move that fast other than on a running track.

He made it on the back platform with a crash and was running so fast, his momentum carried him right up stairs. It was a that precise moment the police man waved us on, our driver let out the clutch and the bus lurched forward. Our young friend was now totally off balance and to save himself, he made a grab for what he thought was one of the vertical steel tubes that all buses had. But what he grabbed wasn't a regular tube.

It was a billiard cue in a case belonging to the man sitting in the row infront of us. The kid snatched the cue case out of th man's hand and still being completely off balance, ended up running down the top deck before tripping and sticking the end of the cue case thorought a window that just happened to be open.

Needless to say, the bus was in uproar and first the conductor and then the driver came up to find out what all the noise was about. Then the policeman arrived to find out why the bus had stopped and was blocking the road. They all had a good laugh and the good news was the cue was not damaged.

Regards

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here is my tupence worth! this was took in Aug 1992 and you can still see the cobbles

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here is my tupence worth! this was took in Aug 1992 and you can still see the cobbles

... with the Andrews bus passing across the top, being the ex SYPTE DMS 1515 ,OKW515R , new in '77 (jubilee year) , and has been saved for preservation down at Tinsley ! ...another pic.....

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... with the Andrews bus passing across the top, being the ex SYPTE DMS 1515 ,OKW515R , new in '77 (jubilee year) , and has been saved for preservation down at Tinsley ! ...another pic.....

yeah thats what i was actually taking the picture of at the time. I got some more of 1515 in the depot and during a tour of famous sheffield landmarks if your interested i will scan them and post them soon

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yeah thats what i was actually taking the picture of at the time. I got some more of 1515 in the depot and during a tour of famous sheffield landmarks if your interested i will scan them and post them soon

....a couple more of 1515 ......

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...1515 a couple of years ago awaiting preservation - now relocated to Tinsley Tram Sheds........

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do you know how it got the discinctive bent lower panel on the right hand front?

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do you know how it got the discinctive bent lower panel on the right hand front?

...i dont , but i am surprised it did'nt get repanneled during one of its repaints !!

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I thought thats how all DMS's should be when i was younger! lol, apparently it got done on an incline attending a school during a private hire.

some more images of 1515, The one outside the Crucible theatre was taken during a tour of famous Sheffield landmarks in 1993 but could anyone tell me what the relevance is with this bus and this location?? 10 Gold stars if you know

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I thought thats how all DMS's should be when i was younger! lol, apparently it got done on an incline attending a school during a private hire.

some more images of 1515, The one outside the Crucible theatre was taken during a tour of famous Sheffield landmarks in 1993 but could anyone tell me what the relevance is with this bus and this location?? 10 Gold stars if you know

Benjamin HUNTSMAN was the inventor of CRUCIBLE steel,

The photograph of said bus (the benjamin Huntsman) was taken outside the CRUCIBLE theatre.

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Benjamin HUNTSMAN was the inventor of CRUCIBLE steel,

The photograph of said bus (the benjamin Huntsman) was taken outside the CRUCIBLE theatre.

yay you win Plain Talker 10/10

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In the basement of the huntsman building at the northern general hosp there is a display showing the life of Huntsman and it includes a photo of 1515 with andrews in front of the cruicible theatre

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Used to catch the buses back home to Wadsley Bridge from Bridge Street terminous. These were generally the no 80 (Chapeltown) and no 49 (Ecclesfield). Does anyone remember if the no 42 (Foxhill) actually stopped there? I can't remember if it did, I seem to remember catching it just across from Castle Market.

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Used to catch the buses back home to Wadsley Bridge from Bridge Street terminous. These were generally the no 80 (Chapeltown) and no 49 (Ecclesfield). Does anyone remember if the no 42 (Foxhill) actually stopped there? I can't remember if it did, I seem to remember catching it just across from Castle Market.

For a short while in the 60's I had occasion to go to Grenoside Village.

I don't remember the bus number but I think I got it at Bridge Street.

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Used to catch the buses back home to Wadsley Bridge from Bridge Street terminous. These were generally the no 80 (Chapeltown) and no 49 (Ecclesfield). Does anyone remember if the no 42 (Foxhill) actually stopped there? I can't remember if it did, I seem to remember catching it just across from Castle Market.

The 42 always (in my recollection and records, dating back to the early 1970s) ran via Haymarket, Waingate and Nursery Street en route to Fox Hill, and as a successor to the Wadsley Bridge tram route I suspect it always did.

For a short while in the 60's I had occasion to go to Grenoside Village.

I don't remember the bus number but I think I got it at Bridge Street.

Don't know about the sixties, but by 1971 the Grenoside Village services were 91 and 98 which started from Bridge Street, as did route 80 which ran along the main road at Grenoside.

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Hi Busman you are correct on the 42 it went up Halfax Road and turned left up (Browning Road) I think it was called up to Fox Hill Road turned right and then first left to a bus terminus which was a small island in front of the flats. The 42 terminated at the cafe at Graves Park at the other end of the route. It later ran up Fox Hill Road to Grenoside and straight across Salt Box Lane and terminating oppisite the Norfolk Arms

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The 42 always (in my recollection and records, dating back to the early 1970s) ran via Haymarket, Waingate and Nursery Street en route to Fox Hill, and as a successor to the Wadsley Bridge tram route I suspect it always did.

Don't know about the sixties, but by 1971 the Grenoside Village services were 91 and 98 which started from Bridge Street, as did route 80 which ran along the main road at Grenoside.

[/qu In the 60s it would have been the 79 and 91 which were Greengate Lane circular as the 98 ran Nether Edge to Southey Green via Longley Lane

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Hi Busman you are correct on the 42 it went up Halfax Road and turned left up (Browning Road) I think it was called up to Fox Hill Road turned right and then first left to a bus terminus which was a small island in front of the flats. The 42 terminated at the cafe at Graves Park at the other end of the route. It later ran up Fox Hill Road to Grenoside and straight across Salt Box Lane and terminating oppisite the Norfolk Arms

You brought back a few happy memories there. Miss Monkerr the lady!!!!!!!!! who worked at Division Street in charge of dismissing road staff lived somewhere up Warminster, not far from Graves Park terminus. It would be towards the end of 1966 when the 42/53 routes were altered on the south side of Sheffield, both going straight up Chesterfield Road to terminate at Lowedges making the service 38 redundant. By the way, it was Wilcox Road not Browning on the way up to Foxhill. Thanks for that `sammyoposite`. Regards, W/E.

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In the basement of the huntsman building at the northern general hosp there is a display showing the life of Huntsman and it includes a photo of 1515 with andrews in front of the cruicible theatre

My Dad took that photo!

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