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dunsbyowl1867

Shefffield Street Names

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dunsbyowl1867

Some notes from "A Popular History of Sheffield" by J. Edward Vickers

Anyone add to these? Or disagree with his suggestions?

Orchard Street / Orchard Lane - 18th Century - orchards occupied the space between Church Street & Fargate. Fairbanks' map calls them Brelsforth Orchards. Robert Brelsforth - Master Cutler 1648

Market Place was originally - Bull Stake (bull baiting)

Bridge Street - originally called "Under the Water" (flooding from the Don.

Pond Street - the ponds that powered a number of mills

Fargate - means the Far Way (gate meant way)

Campo Lane - priests called churchyard "Camp Sanctus"

Townhead Street - mid 18th Century known as Well Gate (surplus water flowwed into a pond (1746)

Ratten Row - a "nest of filth & iniquity" a narrow lane at the bottom of Well Gate curving toward West Bar Green

Trippet Lane - named after the Trippet family ( old family mentioned on Poll Tax return of 1379)

Scargill Croft - Scargill family feature heavily in town affairs between 1560-1689

Between Norfolk Street & Midland Station

Streets laid out by Vincent Eyre on Alsops Fields - agent of the Duke of Norfolk. Named after Duke's possessions and family. So we get

Norfolk Street

Howard Street

Surrey Street

Arundel Street & Eyre Street

Snig Hill - after metal snigs - cart wheel brakes or from the eels which lived in the small ponds at the bottom of the hill (know as snigs)

Angel Street from the famous coaching inn

Bank Street from the private bank at the end of the street

Figtree Lane - a fig tree grew in a garden on that area

Sloped field between Campo Lane & West Bar bounded by Figtree Lane & Paradise Square - had been called Wade's orchard.

Barker's Pool - after Mr Barker of Reservoir fame of Balm Green ( Cutlers used to use balm leaves to wrap around cuts to stop bleeding)

Truelove's Gutter - now castle street - after Mr Truelove who owned property near the gutter or drain.

Paradise Square - had been a cornfield called "Hicks Stile Field" and previously as "Pot Square" after pot traders.

Wicker - Assembly Green - Yeomen & Freeman of Hallamshire gathered here once a year to muster on Tuesday after Easter. The last Assembly taking place was on Easter Tuesday 1715.

Knock 'em down alley - was a narrow passage at the top of Townhead Street

'Cock Tail" - Furnace Hill after an Inn in the area.

The Pickle - district between 1st Midland Railway (bottom of Spital Hill) & 12 O'clock inn.

Sycamore Street - after the trees between Tudor Place and River Sheaf

Button Lane - Button making once flourished there

Goose Green - one at Attercliffe and Highfield

Lamp Pool Lane - now Jansen Street. Sheep washing

Black Lame Lane - now Broomhall Street

Named after large Houses or Halls

Chipping House Road

Charnock Hall

Dial House Road

New Hall Road

Cannon Hall Road etc

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Guest plain talker

there are many roads named for our Elizabethan/ Mary Queen of Scots connections, and the Norfolks who were MQoS gaoler.

for example, their family name is Howard:- Howard St, Howard Rd Talbot, they are also Shrewsbury, Norfolk.

the Manor/ Arbourthorne and Norfolk Park area has/had many MQoS links:-

Babington,

Cary,

FitzHubert,

FitzWalter

FitzAlan

Paulet

Guildford,

Felbrigg

Framlingham,

Scotia

Stafford, etc

other links include Arbourthorne itself, named for a legendary "arbour" of "thornes" -an orchard that MQoS had during her imprisonment in Sheffield.

we also have names with links to our anglo saxon/norman rulers:-

Waltheof,

Wulfric

de Lovetot

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Guest Gramps

"Market Place was originally - Bull Stake (bull baiting)"

Don't think he's right about this. The Haymarket is shown as the Bull Stake on Fairbank's 1775 plan although on Gosling's earlier plan of 1736 the Haymarket is named as the Beast Market.

The Market Place was where the Market Cross stood - and occupied the area, now known as Angel street down to the Irish Cross at the top of Snig Hill.

And I'm not sure the Bull Stake was about bull-baiting; it was more likely the place where the owners of a cow or two brought their animals for insemination. No point keeping a cow unless it produced milk which it wouldn't do unless it had calved.

Many of the 16th./17th. century 'little mesters' combined small time farming with their trade and the inventories show that a cow was often listed amongst their possesions. See David Hey, The Fiery Blades of Hallamshire.

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Guest Jeremy

A couple of other suggestions for Campo Lane...

Joseph Hunter in 'Hallamshire' gave this folk etymology:

It is a prevalent opinion at Sheffield, that the area of the present parish church-yard was anciently a camp of the Romans. It is well-known that such situations were sometimes chosen for the erection of Christian temples; and the name of a street which passes under the walls of the cemetery on the north side, Campo-lane, may seem to give some countenance to the opinion. I have also heard that urns containing ashes as of some human body that had been burnt, were found several years ago on digging in the neighbourhood of Bank-street.

Sidney O Addy in his 'Glossary' gave a couple of suggestions:

In Gosling's map of Sheffield, 1736, it is called 'Camper Lane.' The same map shows the position of the old 'Latin School,' or Grammar School, and the 'Writing School.' These schools were at a very short distance from Campo Lane, and it seems probable that here the game of football was played. The Grammar School was founded in 1603. The Prompt. Parv. has Campar or pleyar at footballe, pedipilusor.' (See the note in Way's edition.) In Brinsley's Grammar Schoole, cited by Mr. Furnivall in Early English Meals and Manners, p. Ixii, I find this passage:— 'By this meanes also the schollars may be kept euer in their places, and hard to their labours without that running out to the Campo (as they tearme it) at school times, and the manifolde disorders thereof; as watching and striuing for the clubbe, and loytering then in the fields.' (For the meaning of 'clubbe,' see pp. 299 and 300 of Brinsley.) Hunter says:—'The Campa field' occurs several times in the returns of their Sheffield estates by the Dukes of Norfolk, compelling Roman Catholics to register their estates with the Clerk of the Peace. This proves that there was once a field in Sheffield appropriated to this sport, and what more probable than that it was the open space now called Paradise Square? Campo lane, so called, as leading to it—in full, the Camper field lane.'—Hunter's MS. Bateman opened a barrow at the summit of a rocky hill, near Ecton mine, called by the natives the Comp.—Ten Years' Diggings, p. 34. Cf. Compton, near Ashbourne. Bateman opened a large barrow at Cawthorn Camps, Yorkshire.—Ibid., p. 206. See CAMPFIELD. As Campo Lane runs along the ridge of a steep hill, the most probable derivation is O. Icel. kambr, a ridge.

Jeremy

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Guest barbrook

Can anybody tell me what Croft means, as in Pea Croft,please?

Also, Storth as in the Pear Storth ( at Ryle Road, Nether Edge)

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SteveHB

'Storth' may have come from a term used...

'STORTHING' meaning excellent, in good condition ; applied to a

horse.

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Guest Gramps

According to Melvyn Jones in Sheffield's Historic Woodlands 'storth' is a Scandinavian term for a coppice wood, often retained by the land, as a field name, when it was cleared for agriculture. Storrs is perhaps a plural ?

Most ofthe 'croft' names in Sheffield seem to apply to enclosures (or 'closes') on lands that once were part of the 'Town Fields'. Those running off West Bar Green seem to coincide with strips of the town fields that were enclosed, and when they were eventually built on, the streets were given the old name of the crofts.

But why were they called crofts in the first place - did the owners build a house on them ?

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Bayleaf

According to Melvyn Jones in Sheffield's Historic Woodlands 'storth' is a Scandinavian term for a coppice wood, often retained by the land, as a field name, when it was cleared for agriculture. Storrs is perhaps a plural ?

Most ofthe 'croft' names in Sheffield seem to apply to enclosures (or 'closes') on lands that once were part of the 'Town Fields'. Those running off West Bar Green seem to coincide with strips of the town fields that were enclosed, and when they were eventually built on, the streets were given the old name of the crofts.

But why were they called crofts in the first place - did the owners build a house on them ?

Hi Gramps

According to Mel Jones, Storrs is a corruption of Storth. Croft was usually the name of a field or enclosure next to the house, so as the town expanded, each house would have a piece of land next to it where the householder would grow his veg, or keep a pig or a cow.

The other name that used to puzzle me was Bents, as in Bents green, Totley Bents, and Benty Lane. Apparently Bent is a kind of coarse grass which is no good for grazing.

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Guest Virus

Doing this from memory so may not be completely accurate...

Pinstone Street - Used to be called Pinson Lane, so called because it had a trapezoid shaped pen used for keeping pigs which is called a pinson near it.

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Bayleaf

Doing this from memory so may not be completely accurate...

Pinstone Street - Used to be called Pinson Lane, so called because it had a trapezoid shaped pen used for keeping pigs which is called a pinson near it.

Pinstone Street was earlier called Pinson Street, and earlier still Pincher Croft Lane.

Pinfold Street was where the cattle pen was sited where the pinder put stray cattle he rounded up. The owner had to collect them and pay a fee to get them back. The old pound was at the end of Pinfold Lane, and the remains were finally removed in 1930.

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Guest Gramps

Pinfold Street was where the cattle pen was sited where the pinder put stray cattle he rounded up. The owner had to collect them and pay a fee to get them back. The old pound was at the end of Pinfold Lane, and the remains were finally removed in 1930.

I don't imagine stray cattle were much of a problem, - in the town at least. Many of the ordinary townsfolk however did keep a pig in the yard which was allowed out to forage around in the general street garbage for dietary supplement.

Leader has a little to say about the pinfold and pigs.

The pinfold, which gives to Pinfold street its name, was a quadrilateral structure, not a true square, on the south side (that is on the left, going from Church Street) of the lane. Its shape was what geometricians call a trapezoid like the lines that might be drawn round a capital W, the broad line at the top of the letter fronting to Pinfold Street, and the shorter line, across the bottom, being where Bow Street afterwards ran. There had been an older pinfold in 1592. Its locality has not been ascertained, but it was in convenient contiguity to the stocks. The later one, here described, the last of its race, survived until 1835, when it succumbed to a scheme of street widening, and its site was let for building. But that it was not considered altogether an anachronism even then is manifest from the fact that efforts were made to find another suitable place for a new pinfold efforts which seem to have been futile.

That the pinfold was subjected to rough treatment, indicating resentfulness on tlle part of those whose belongings were "pounded," is manifest from the constant repairs that had to be done throughout the centuries to its walls and its door. The " pinder" was by no means a popular functionary.

It was a very common practice, on the part of frugal citizens, to keep " the gintlemin that pays the rint." In the old days the community combined to hire a swineherd, to the sound of whose horn, as he walked through the streets on his way to the common pasture-land outside the town, the pigs came flocking, rushing out of shops, and wheels, and houses, and styes or " swyne howles," down entries and jennels, with joyous grunts. But, later, it was very much the habit to allow the pigs to roam at large in the streets, grubbing among the refuse which, in the absence of any scavengering, was all too abundant. Between these and the pinder there was perpetual war. Towards Christmas, when fattening began, many a working man's family was put on short commons, the children's food being stinted to buy meal for the pig. It was a customary thing to have pig troughs at the doors of the houses, and the sight of pigs feeding there, on the public footpath, was a common one. They were summoned from their roamings by the rattle of a bucket or can, and their prompt obedience to this call was a source of much tribulation to old Clarke, the pinder, for when he was trying to run a wandering pig into the pinfold, the owner would set up a great clatter with the bucket, and the pig would outrun his pursuer and be safely housed before the officer could catch him. When he did get a porker into the pound, the liberation fee was fourpence, but the pinder was so systematically regarded as the common foe that when the waits, the bellman, and the night watchman were pocketing their Christmas boxes, he was severely ignored.

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Guest Virus

Pinstone Street was earlier called Pinson Street, and earlier still Pincher Croft Lane.

Pinfold Street was where the cattle pen was sited where the pinder put stray cattle he rounded up. The owner had to collect them and pay a fee to get them back. The old pound was at the end of Pinfold Lane, and the remains were finally removed in 1930.

That's sounds more like it! lol! Told you I'd get it wrong, never trust my memory!!!! I found a description of Pinstone Street from the 18th century which says it had a channel running down the middle but with steep sloping sides which may have proved a little hazardous when trying to walk down it in the dark!

Quote:

" … " my father in particular referring to Pinstone Street as being very bad. Instead of a channel on each side of the street as now, our grandfathers had one channel in the middle. The sides were highest, and sloped down to this channel." - Taken from Reminiscences of Old Sheffield by Robert Leader

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Guest Old Canny Street Kid

Some notes from "A Popular History of Sheffield" by J. Edward Vickers

Anyone add to these? Or disagree with his suggestions?

Orchard Street / Orchard Lane - 18th Century - orchards occupied the space between Church Street & Fargate. Fairbanks' map calls them Brelsforth Orchards. Robert Brelsforth - Master Cutler 1648

Market Place was originally - Bull Stake (bull baiting)

Bridge Street - originally called "Under the Water" (flooding from the Don.

Pond Street - the ponds that powered a number of mills

Fargate - means the Far Way (gate meant way)

Campo Lane - priests called churchyard "Camp Sanctus"

Townhead Street - mid 18th Century known as Well Gate (surplus water flowwed into a pond (1746)

Ratten Row - a "nest of filth & iniquity" a narrow lane at the bottom of Well Gate curving toward West Bar Green

Trippet Lane - named after the Trippet family ( old family mentioned on Poll Tax return of 1379)

Scargill Croft - Scargill family feature heavily in town affairs between 1560-1689

Between Norfolk Street & Midland Station

Streets laid out by Vincent Eyre on Alsops Fields - agent of the Duke of Norfolk. Named after Duke's possessions and family. So we get

Norfolk Street

Howard Street

Surrey Street

Arundel Street & Eyre Street

Snig Hill - after metal snigs - cart wheel brakes or from the eels which lived in the small ponds at the bottom of the hill (know as snigs)

Angel Street from the famous coaching inn

Bank Street from the private bank at the end of the street

Figtree Lane - a fig tree grew in a garden on that area

Sloped field between Campo Lane & West Bar bounded by Figtree Lane & Paradise Square - had been called Wade's orchard.

Barker's Pool - after Mr Barker of Reservoir fame of Balm Green ( Cutlers used to use balm leaves to wrap around cuts to stop bleeding)

Truelove's Gutter - now castle street - after Mr Truelove who owned property near the gutter or drain.

Paradise Square - had been a cornfield called "Hicks Stile Field" and previously as "Pot Square" after pot traders.

Wicker - Assembly Green - Yeomen & Freeman of Hallamshire gathered here once a year to muster on Tuesday after Easter. The last Assembly taking place was on Easter Tuesday 1715.

Knock 'em down alley - was a narrow passage at the top of Townhead Street

'Cock Tail" - Furnace Hill after an Inn in the area.

The Pickle - district between 1st Midland Railway (bottom of Spital Hill) & 12 O'clock inn.

Sycamore Street - after the trees between Tudor Place and River Sheaf

Button Lane - Button making once flourished there

Goose Green - one at Attercliffe and Highfield

Lamp Pool Lane - now Jansen Street. Sheep washing

Black Lame Lane - now Broomhall Street

Named after large Houses or Halls

Chipping House Road

Charnock Hall

Dial House Road

New Hall Road

Cannon Hall Road etc

Anybody know the origin of Danville Street? Or Bramber Street?

Danville Street was off Grimesthorpe Road, while Bramber Street was off Spital Hill.

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Bayleaf

Anybody know the origin of Danville Street? Or Bramber Street?

Danville Street was off Grimesthorpe Road, while Bramber Street was off Spital Hill.

Apparently Bramber Street was built on land owned by the Duke of Norfolk, and named after the village of Bramber which was close to his stately home at Arundel in Sussex.

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Guest jinosbrovens

Pretty combinations and good names you guys have posted.This requires for me to know the whole history of sheffield.well according i will suggest "Sheffields lanes" for all of its farm.Then the lanes will depending on the farms there.Its too good to suggest a name for sheffield.

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ukelele lady

In the 1800s did Church Street Attercliffe become Worksop Road or

are they two seperate places?

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Bayleaf

In the 1800s did Church Street Attercliffe become Worksop Road or

are they two seperate places?

Nope, spot on m'lady, 1860 was the date.

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ukelele lady

Nope, spot on m'lady, 1860 was the date.

Thank you Bayleaf.

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ukelele lady

I've been searching some ancesters and came across these addresses,

does anyone know where they are?

Tilt Yard

Sargeant's Square

Creswick Walk.

Thank you in advance :)

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SteveHB

I've been searching some ancesters and came across these addresses,

does anyone know where they are?

Tilt Yard

Sargeant's Square

Creswick Walk.

Thank you in advance :)

Think I'm right right in saying that 'Tilt Yard'

would have been preceded by the name of an area,

there would have been quite a few Tilt Yards in Sheffield at one time.

A bit like trying to find a 'coal yard' - but which one and where?

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Guest Gramps

There was a 'Tilt Yard' off Pond street - almost opposite the bottom of Surrey lane.

Creswick Walk was off Pond Hill opposite the entrance to Ponds Forge, - perhaps the corner where the Queens Head stands. The pub isn't marked on the map but I don't think it was licensed until 1852.

No luck with Sargeant's Square I'm afraid.

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ukelele lady

There was a 'Tilt Yard' off Pond street - almost opposite the bottom of Surrey lane.

Creswick Walk was off Pond Hill opposite the entrance to Ponds Forge, - perhaps the corner where the Queens Head stands. The pub isn't marked on the map but I don't think it was licensed until 1852.

No luck with Sargeant's Square I'm afraid.

Thanks Gramps, your right again, we can always count on you. lol

I've been looking at the census at Shoreham Street today and found that Tilt Yard was off Pond Street

and so was Ceswick Walk.

Sargeant's Square was off the Wicker. So now we know, ask me again next month and I will have

forgotten. :blink:

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History dude

I don't imagine stray cattle were much of a problem, - in the town at least. Many of the ordinary townsfolk however did keep a pig in the yard which was allowed out to forage around in the general street garbage for dietary supplement.

Leader has a little to say about the pinfold and pigs.

You are forgetting the cattle market. People bringing in the sheep etc, easy to lose one I would have thought. The person in charge of the Pinfold was the Pinder. And seeing that's a common name, even in Sheffield, a high turnover rate in the job! Not many people would like you with that job :(

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ukelele lady

Where was or is Parliament Street anyone?

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SteveHB
On 19/12/2010 at 13:26, ukelele lady said:

Where was or is Parliament Street anyone?

Little Sheffield

https://goo.gl/maps/bhcEQZ2sdCk

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