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Black Swan Walk

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Sheffield History

BLACK SWAN WALK

LOCATION
Fargate, runs parallel with Chapel Walk

INFORMATION

Would love some information on this one folks.. do you remember this place or know what used to be down there ?

 

 

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Guest glenys

Hi

I am also interested in Black Swan Walk.

There is a carving of the word "PAIN" on the building as you enter that lane, on the left. Does anyone know what this is about??

I have attached an image here

Thanks

Glenys

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Stuart0742

Picture Sheffield link

I know it does not answer the query.

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Guest glenys

Hi

Can anyone shed any light on the carving of the word "PAIN" on the wall on the left hand side as you enter Black Swan Walk off Fargate (it runs at the back of Chapel Walk)

Thanks

Glenys

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Guest glenys

Hi Stuart

Thanks - it is an interesting picture non the less.

When I get a bit of time I will have a better look down there with the old camera!

That's if I don't get done for looking suspicious!!

Glenys

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RichardB

Hi

I am also interested in Black Swan Walk.

There is a carving of the word "PAIN" on the building as you enter that lane, on the left. Does anyone know what this is about??

I have attached an image here

Thanks

Glenys

Try Thomas Paine - The Rights of Man - just a thought. (Currently busy, sorry).

Here

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DaveH

Try Thomas Paine - The Rights of Man - just a thought. (Currently busy, sorry).

Here

Spelt differently Richard (PAIN as opposed to PAINE)

In any case when I saw this in Sheffield recently I read it as RAIN and not PAIN so I take it that the diagonal stroke on the P to convert it into an R is a later unauthorised addition.

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Bayleaf

I passed that way today and took a look. The lettering looks quite recent, and if you look to the right and one course up it looks as though something has been obliterated, and not just sprayed grafitti, the actual surface of the stone has been chiseled away. Could there be a connection, but the 'pain/rain' bit left so as not to spoil the finish of the corner block?

Slightly different, but I do know where it goes, it goes to the service entrance of Boots. I once had the pleasure of reversing my car down there to pick some stuff up for work - not an easy job, the worst part was getting the pedestians to let me through!

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hilldweller

Slightly different, but I do know where it goes, it goes to the service entrance of Boots. I once had the pleasure of reversing my car down there to pick some stuff up for work - not an easy job, the worst part was getting the pedestians to let me through!

I think it eventually threads it's way past the service entrances to some of the Chapel Walk Shops and zig-zags to a door into George Street at the back of the Victoria Hall. I once saw a bloke pop out of that door carrying a side of bacon, he didn't lock the door 'so I had a quick shufti and I came out in Fargate. I think the door is normally kept locked.

HD

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RichardB

I think it eventually threads it's way past the service entrances to some of the Chapel Walk Shops and zig-zags to a door into George Street at the back of the Victoria Hall. I once saw a bloke pop out of that door carrying a side of bacon, he didn't lock the door 'so I had a quick shufti and I came out in Fargate. I think the door is normally kept locked.

HD

Interesting, could be an old, hidden thoroughfare.

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mickjj

I took these pictures a couple of years ago on a visit home

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RichardB

Now that lots of shops have closed, wouldn't it be an idea to force the owners to remove the horrendoes claddings and suchlike.

Example

I don't know whether that shop is still closed, but there will be plenty more in a similar state all over the place. It'll come down to money ... but maybe a photo expert can copy a chunk of the upper floors and wipe out the purpleness.

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SteveHB

Now that lots of shops have closed, wouldn't it be an idea to force the owners to remove the horrendoes claddings and suchlike.

Example

I don't know whether that shop is still closed, but there will be plenty more in a similar state all over the place. It'll come down to money ... but maybe a photo expert can copy a chunk of the upper floors and wipe out the purpleness.

I would copy and change the photo, but I don't think local photographer evissa would be too happy

if she found out that I had used her copyrighted image.

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RichardB

I would copy and change the photo, but I don't think local photographer evissa would be too happy

if she found out that I had used her copyrighted image.

Indeed. Sneak out tonight please and remove ALL of 'em - right the way across town

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SteveHB
On 03/03/2011 at 16:37, RichardB said:

Indeed. Sneak out tonight please and remove ALL of 'em - right the way across town laugh.gif

We can take a look at what the original (without the cladding) unadulterated building looked like,

here on picturesheffield s00840

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RichardB

We can take a look at what the original (without the cladding) unadulterated building looked like,

here on picturesheffield

Anything to save a night-time mass destruction foray huh Steve ?

Thank you, much improved view.

A H Holland, Provision merchant, ham and bacon curer and cheese factor, 1, 3, 5, 7 & 9 Chapel Walk, Fargate. (1893)

What an odd address - Chapel Walk, Fargate.

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RichardB

We can take a look at what the original (without the cladding) unadulterated building looked like,

here on picturesheffield

and, of course, William Throsby, Hatter, 9 Chapel Walk, 1871.

though Throsby ?? mmm Thorsby maybe ?

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SteveHB
On 03/03/2011 at 19:53, RichardB said:

Anything to save a night-time mass destruction foray huh Steve ?

Thank you, much improved view.

A H Holland, Provision merchant, ham and bacon curer and cheese factor, 1, 3, 5, 7 & 9 Chapel Walk, Fargate. (1893)

What an odd address - Chapel Walk, Fargate.

It looks like the ground floor frontage went at an early date,

Austin Reed Ltd., No. 9, Fargate .. picturesheffield .. year?

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RichardB

It looks like the ground floor frontage went at an early date,

Austin Reed Ltd., No. 9, Fargate .. picturesheffield .. year?

Is it in your 1965 Kelly's ? I would have thought so.

My 1957 - can't check until tomorrow.

Anyone any memories of when the place started as Austin Reeds please ?

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SteveHB

Is it in your 1965 Kelly's ? I would have thought so.

My 1957 - can't check until tomorrow.

Anyone any memories of when the place started as Austin Reeds please ?

Yes, Austin Reed Ltd were there in 1965,

the photo looks pre 60's (mid to late 50's) to me.

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RichardB

Yes, Austin Reed Ltd were there in 1965,

the photo looks pre 60's (mid to late 50's) to me.

My 1957 might be useful then, if only it wasn't 30 miles away in Hexham.

I'll be there tomorrow.

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RichardB

My 1957 might be useful then, if only it wasn't 30 miles away in Hexham.

I'll be there tomorrow.

1957

Austin Reed Ltd, Men's outfitters, 9 Fargate.

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RichardB

It looks like the ground floor frontage went at an early date,

Austin Reed Ltd., No. 9, Fargate .. picturesheffield .. year?

Nothing to do with your photo, this is just for your information :

Trading internationally since 1929, Austin Reed is a high profile retail brand across the globe, from the USA to Colombia and India to the Far East. Austin Reed continues to successfully expand internationally with newly opened stores in markets such as the Middle East and the Republic of South Korea. Today there are over a 1000 retail outlets worldwide that are now selling Austin Reed products.

Site

Which still leaves the question when they started, since they probably traded non-internationally before getting international ... :)

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RichardB

From a single shop, Austin Reed has grown from a traditional retailer into a dynamic and progressive business, with outlets throughout the UK.

Austin Reed opened his first men’s tailoring store in 1900 in Fenchurch Street, London, having learnt “tricks of the trade” from American retailers and manufacturers. Within 11 years he opened an impressive flagship store, dedicated to tailoring, ready-to-wear clothing and grooming, in London’s premier shopping location - Regent Street.

Consumer demands and design trends have evolved dramatically over the past century. Austin Reed has shown commitment to innovation and readiness to respond to new market directions and retailing practices.

In 1925, recognising such an opportunity, Austin Reed took the revolutionary step of offering high quality, value-for-money ready-to-wear suits.

Dull Corporate site

Maybe that should have read "Full", oh well.

The last paragraph is quite interesting.

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tozzin

I walked down Black Swan Walk today to see if I could find the last remnant of White Bear Yard which is a Jennel behind the Victoria Hall but it seems its behind a pair of double doors on Chapel Walk but I did find this winding gear at the bottom of Black Swan Walk and it seems the gate that stood there was removed and the void bricked up. The black strip of metal that can be seen in the corner seems to have been part of the guide for the gate that stood here.

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