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Stuart0742

Tram Locations

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Got it now - Thanks

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A new one to have a go at.

Looking down Furnival Street, not too far down from the photo I posted in the Gents Outfitters thread

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Looking down Furnival Street, not very far from the photo I posted in the Gents Outfitters thread

Crikey that was quick MA !

Yes the firm on the R/H side is Kerry's Ltd., Motor Accessories,

seen on the left hand side of the road here picturesheffield

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Crikey that was quick MA !

Yes the firm on the R/H side is Kerry's Ltd., Motor Accessories,

seen on the left hand side of the road here picturesheffield

Possibly because I have just spent some time looking at Furnival Street photos :rolleyes:

Another view of Kerry's on Picture Sheffield, albeit in the background, but looking the same way as your tram photo.

Edited by madannie77
fixed broken Picture Sheffield link

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Here's one which I haven't been able to locate exactly, partly due to the lack of background. Perhaps a Kelly's directory (or something similar) might be of use.

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Here's one which I haven't been able to locate exactly, partly due to the lack of background. Perhaps a Kelly's directory (or something similar) might be of use.

If thats a shoe shop, there was a Walkers Shoe shop at 675 Attercliffe Rd, does that help

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If thats a shoe shop, there was a Walkers Shoe shop at 675 Attercliffe Rd, does that help

675 would be where the trees are

Courtesy of Google SV

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If thats a shoe shop, there was a Walkers Shoe shop at 675 Attercliffe Rd, does that help

That helps a lot, because it locates the photo more or less where i thought it was. If it is Walkers, 675 Attercliffe Road, the shot is looking down Attercliffe Road from somewhere adjacent to Brinsworth Street, the tram heading towards Beauchief ( as is visible on the destination blind).

Thanks for the quick reply :)

Is there a Map Fairy nearby to illustrate this? Map 66 is the one required.

EDIT:

A google streetview has appeared as I type

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That helps a lot, because it locates the photo more or less where i thought it was. If it is Walkers, 675 Attercliffe Road, the shot is looking down Attercliffe Road from somewhere adjacent to Brinsworth Street, the tram heading towards Beauchief ( as is visible on the destination blind).

Thanks for the quick reply :)

Is there a Map Fairy nearby to illustrate this? Map 66 is the one required.

EDIT:

A google streetview has appeared as I type

Are map fairies like link fairies

Link to Map 66

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Are map fairies like link fairies

Link to Map 66

Fantastic service as ever. I did have a Map Fairy kit of some sort, but the arrow wasn't quite right :o

It tended to blot out most of the map lol

It looks to me that the best map fairies are like link fairies but with delicate arrows.

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Fantastic service as ever. I did have a Map Fairy kit of some sort, but the arrow wasn't quite right :o

It tended to blot out most of the map lol

It looks to me that the best map fairies are like link fairies but with delicate arrows.

Richard's description of a Link Farie (his spelling)

Link Fairie

A person (or persons), of undetermined gender,

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We do not appear to have had this one.

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We do not appear to have had this one.

I think this is Intake terminus (the 1902-1935 version) at the junction of what was Main Road (now Mansfield Road) and Woodhouse Road. We are looking up Main Road towards Manor Top, with Woodhouse Road on the right, the photographer standing about level with the Methodist Church & Ball Inn.

Google Streetview from about the same place. I have given up trying to embed this :angry:

Edited by madannie77
added Google Streetview link

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I think this is Intake terminus (the 1902-1935 version) at the junction of what was Main Road (now Mansfield Road) and Woodhouse Road. We are looking up Main Road towards Manor Top, with Woodhouse Road on the right, the photographer standing about level with the Methodist Church & Ball Inn.

I think that, not only are you right, but you are correct, spot on and exact as well.

The buildings on the right match perfectly.

I'll get myself up there.

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I think that, not only are you right, but you are correct, spot on and exact as well.

The buildings on the right match perfectly.

I'll get myself up there.

...yes thats the location !

The first two buildings on the left also match with the stepped gable end , and even the roof windows match , though the third building behind the telegraph pole is demolished.

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...yes thats the location !

The first two buildings on the left also match with the stepped gable end , and even the roof windows match , though the third building behind the telegraph pole is demolished.

And what wonderful poles they are.

I note that the single storey building on the right appears to be a barber's (Shave Sir). Has anyone got any info about barbers on Main Road/Mansfield Road. I reckon it is no 31 (from a perusal of map 127)

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And what wonderful poles they are.

I note that the single storey building on the right appears to be a barber's (Shave Sir). Has anyone got any info about barbers on Main Road/Mansfield Road. I reckon it is no 31 (from a perusal of map 127)

1925..

Main Road, Intake.

-----------------

Woohouse Road

-----------------

Bates Edwin, grocer.

29 Jeffery William, collier.

31 Hardy John Hy. fried fish dealr.

33 Lound Joseph Henry, hair drssr.

35 Darwent Mrs. Elizabeth, draper.

37 Linacre Wm. Thos. news agent.

39 Fleetwood Mrs. Hessie, fruiterer.

41 Jackson Albert, shopkeeper.

41 Post, M.O., T. & T. E.D. Office;

Albert Jackson, sub postmaster.

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And what wonderful poles they are.

As a chemist you will appreciate this one madannie.

When we used to assemble our own apparatus from scratch we often had to bore holes through corks to fit glass tubing through.

This was done using a "cork borer" which consisted of a hollow tube of the correct diameter for the hole. One end of the tube was honed to a fine cutting edge while the other had a 2 armed handle to allow to be pushed and turned into the cork to cut the hole.

Now glass tubing came in about 8 or 10 different external diameters so you needed a set 8 or 10 of these cork borers to cover all eventualities.

Being different diameter tubes they nicely slotted into each other for storage, and with the 2 arm handles lined up they looked remarkably like that telegraph pole in the picture.

So much so that many old chemists refer to "Cork Borers" as "Telegraph Poles"

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I think that, not only are you right, but you are correct, spot on and exact as well.

The buildings on the right match perfectly.

I'll get myself up there.

Yes vox,

I live near there and it still looks noticably like that today.

If you are going up there I will let you do the "then and now" photographic comparison shot.

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What are the wire frames around the base of the tram power line poles for,

what purpose did they serve ?

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As a chemist you will appreciate this one madannie.

When we used to assemble our own apparatus from scratch we often had to bore holes through corks to fit glass tubing through.

This was done using a "cork borer" which consisted of a hollow tube of the correct diameter for the hole. One end of the tube was honed to a fine cutting edge while the other had a 2 armed handle to allow to be pushed and turned into the cork to cut the hole.

Now glass tubing came in about 8 or 10 different external diameters so you needed a set 8 or 10 of these cork borers to cover all eventualities.

Being different diameter tubes they nicely slotted into each other for storage, and with the 2 arm handles lined up they looked remarkably like that telegraph pole in the picture.

So much so that many old chemists refer to "Cork Borers" as "Telegraph Poles"

I don't recall hearing them called Telegraph Poles, but I can fully understand why they would be.

Cork borers........that takes me back. They were fine until used on rubber bungs!

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What are the wire frames around the base of the tram power line poles for,

what purpose did they serve ?

I have no idea about these frames, having never seen them in any other photograph.

They remind me of the wire netting around trees to prevent livestock damaging the bark. Perhaps it is to prevent horses eating the traction poles.

Or perhaps not....

I shall keep searching.

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I have no idea about these frames, having never seen them in any other photograph.

They remind me of the wire netting around trees to prevent livestock damaging the bark. Perhaps it is to prevent horses eating the traction poles.

Or perhaps not....

I shall keep searching.

They were placed there after the poles had been freshly painted to protect passers- by. W/E.

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They were placed there after the poles had been freshly painted to protect passers- by. W/E.

That sounds entirely logical, and certainly more sensible than my last reply :wacko:. It would also explain why I have never seen them before - how often were photographs taken just after the poles had been painted.

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