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andyc
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Does any one know why Steel Bank above Commonside/St. Joseph's is so named please? The area is listed on a map of the area dated about 1855.

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Guest tsavo

Good question. My old address in Crookes had the Steel Bank tag, but I don't know it's origins. The answer is out there.....somewhere.....

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The name predates the old bank on Commonside (PA Jewellry) and I know there was no steel production there from old maps. Tis a mystery.

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Guest bangtidy

This a total guess but maybe it was steel bank as it is above shalesmoor grounds terms and it is a gradually descent down to shalesmoor which im guessing back then was all steel works, it does overlook it

I then googled and found this apparentley there was a lot of steel workers in the area around commondside maybe this could be the reason it was named steel bank?

worth a look, may be a coincedence?

Id love to know more

http://www.chrishobbs.com/sphill1861census.htm

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This a total guess but maybe it was steel bank as it is above shalesmoor grounds terms and it is a gradually descent down to shalesmoor which im guessing back then was all steel works, it does overlook it

I then googled and found this apparentley there was a lot of steel workers in the area around commondside maybe this could be the reason it was named steel bank?

worth a look, may be a coincedence?

Id love to know more

http://www.chrishobbs.com/sphill1861census.htm

Hello bangtidy,

I just checked the earliest census I can get my hands on for Steel Bank. There are several families living on Steel Bank 1841. According to the 1855 map, the area is still pretty much open countryside.

The entries before Steel Bank are on Commonside, and the addresses after are on Springvale.

We have occupations as per 1841 census:

Forger

Cabinet Maker

Scissor Smith

Farmer (x3)

Mason (x3)

Grinder

Charwoman

Carter

Independants (x2)

On a less detailed map of 1637 Steel Bank is named and there's evidence of Heavygate Road already existing. I can't remember where I got this map from. The name could well predate this map and could be an ancient name that's survived.

Does anyone know when the word 'Steel' entered our vocabulary? It could help date the name.

The second map is dated 1855.

Andy

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The earliest entry I have found so far is from an etymology guide which quotes thus

"languages. The fig. verb sense of "make hard or strong like steel" is first recorded 1581."

Hope this helps!!

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Guest tsavo

Oh well, l maybe I should have paid more attention in the English class. That's what you get for being milk monitor. Ignorance in your old age! :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

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Guest tsavo

Does any one know why Steel Bank above Commonside/St. Joseph's is so named please? The area is listed on a map of the area dated about 1855.

Still don't know the origin, but this from an earlier topic about Heavygate Road make give a little more background.

Matlock Road (formally Wharncliffe Road), I'm pretty sure, is the same age as the streets below it - 1850's. The old road is Heavygate Road itself, at one time known as Steel Bank. I have a photocopy of a Fairbank survey somewhere which shows the road, the farmhouse (unnamed) and Dark Lane (now Northfield Road). That plan is probably from the 1790's, but I'd have to dig it out to be sure. Although the road by the pub isn't steep, to get to it from Commonside the only way was up the steep incline off Howard Road

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I think I have the definitve answer on this one.

In the late 1500's the locals were having a bit of a time of it with the land owners. No one was allowed to kill animals except for the landed gentry, so the enterprising Sheffielders started to fish in the Don. (ever wondered why there are so many people interested in fishing round here?)

Now back then the Don was teeming with, of all things, eels and the good berghurs of Hillsborough, Walkley and so on took to having them for their tea, with a bit of bread and butter and a dash of 'endos.

The biggest problem associated with this though, was the fact the becuase the husband would have to catch them in the morning before work, the wife had to find somewhere to store the eel until her darling came home from t'mill.

So in 1601 the great Sheffield inventor Capability Lackwind invented the EEL BANK.

After a spot of fishing the husband would take his catch to the "bank" and deposite them with the "bogle man" who put the catch in salt to keep it presereved untill his wife came down to get it, ready for tea time

The eel bank or "t'eel bank" as it was known localy was very popular right up untill the days of Queen Victoria but died off with the invention of tinned pilcahrds and the Fletcher van.

After this time there was no reason for the lady of the house to walk to the bank as she could just wait until the little red van pulled up and buy the eel from the man in the van, outside.

It was also about this time the 10p mix and the elephants foot were invented and these gradually helped push the eel out of fashion.....why eat a real eel when you could get two or three jelly ones in a 10p mix, covered in that sour sugar stuff that made you ears dance?

Now given Sheffield was famous mainly for Steel the "S" seemed to have crept in to the "T'EEL BANK" some time in the late 1600's and today we now mistakingly belive it had nothing to do with fishing but, well, those are the facts.

Please forgive the fact that this post is late...it should have been put up in early april!!

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Guest tsavo

No, sorry, just the two that you posted earlier in the topic. If you're offering me one.....yes please!

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No worries. The maps I've posted are the highest resolution I have at the mo. I will try and track down an higher res version of the 1637 map though. Hopefully the archives will have a copy. Also Steel Bank should read Steel Banke, the comtemporary c17 spelling. I'll be convinced then that Steel Bank hasn't been added when the map was reconstructed from earlier maps and docets in the 1980's.

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Guest bangtidy

SHEFFIELD STEEL

Sheffield has been famous for the making of steel since at least the fourteenth century when one of Chaucer's pilgrims is described as carrying a Sheffield Thwitel in his hose.The proximity of iron ore, streams for power and suitable grinding stones made Sheffield an ideal centre for steel making. In the sixteenth century Sheffield began to increasingly specialise in making cutlery with the arrival of Flemish immigrants and the following century in 1624 a Company of Cutlers was established.

In the 1740s Benjamin Huntsman (1704-1776), a Sheffield man born to German parents made huge improvements to the steel making technique at Handsworth in the east of the city. Huntsman was a mechanic and an expert in making steel springs and pendulums for watches, but was unhappy with the quality of the steel. His new steel making process involved the use of a crucible, but his high quality steel was rejected by the Cutlers of Sheffield who refused to use his steel on the grounds that it was too hard to work. Huntsman exported his steel to France and from there French knives made of Huntsman's steel were exported back into England and outsold the work of the Sheffield cutlers. At first the cutlers tried to stop Huntsman from exporting but by 1750 his secret manufacturing methods had been discovered and were copied by other Sheffield cutlers -from here on the Sheffield steel industry boomed.

Steel making improvements continued in Victorian times particularly with the development of the Bessemer process of making steel in the 1850s. This was good fortune for the west Riding town of Sheffield, but a setback for the up the coming iron making town of Middlesbrough in the North Riding of Yorkshire, which was not able to effectively adopt this process until the 1870s. The Bessemer process was invented by Henry Bessemer (1813-98) who set up a steelworks at Sheffield.

The next major event in the history of steel making was the making of Stainless Steel which was pioneered at Sheffield in 1903 - although it was developed in Germany and the USA at around the same time.

Sheffield was a major centre for the manufacture of armaments during the first and second world wars and was a target for enemy bombing, suffering much wartime damage.

anyhelp???

Anyone also know of many roman roads or roman remains in sheffield???

Cheers ;)

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Guest bangtidy

ive visited winco bank the so called roman ridge?

The Celtic area around Sheffield was eventually absorbed by the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria and the fields around the Sheaf (hence Sheffield) were perhaps one of the last areas to be captured by Northumbria. Sheffield would always lie right at the very southern edge of the Northumbrian kingdom. Today it lies on the very southern edge of the northern English region called Yorkshire near the border with the midland counties of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. Remains from the Anglo-Saxon era have been found in Sheffield in the area where a castle was built in later times.

A ridge (known as Roman Ridge) running from Sheffield north to Mexborough formed part of the frontier of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria. The frontier was built by the Northumbrian kings to mark the border with the neighbouring Anglo-Saxon kingdom called Mercia. It is interesting to note that the Anglo-Saxon river name Sheaf means 'boundary-river' and this may also have formed part of the boundary of Northumbria. It may equally have been the boundary of Elmet in an earlier period.

Other rivers forming Northumbrian boundaries were the Humber to the east and the Mersey to the west. Mersey like the Sheaf is an Anglo-Saxon river name which means 'boundary-river'. We also know for certain that the place called DORE , now the most south westerly subburb of Sheffield was right on the boundary between the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Northumbria and Mercia, where it formed a 'door - a Pennine pass between the two kingdoms. Dore was a metting place between the Kings of Mercia and the Kings of Northumbria.Today Dore lies close to the boundaries of Yorkshire and Derbyshire.

Mmmmm interesting :)

Anyone know of many roman roads or remains up redmires rd area and are they possible to go visit anyhelp would be most appreciatted.

Thanks

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Havent been up on Redmires Roman road for a while but here's a map.

Redmires map

It shows a round walk you could start at Fox House, Longshaw or Redmires Reservoir(not much parking at weekend), don't forget to take waterproofs as it is moorland and the weather can change quickly.

Sue

Edit: eek its 14 miles round trip

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Guest bangtidy

Is Hallamshire part of crookes near the hallamshire pub correct me plz i dont understand the borders or location of hallamshire???

Hallamshire (or Hallam) is the historical name for an area of South Yorkshire, England, centred on the current city of Sheffield.

The strong association of the suffix "-shire" with counties was a reasonably late development. Historically, the term shire would simply mean the district appropriated to some city, town, or castle. Hallamshire is usually assumed to be the district associated with a town ("vill") called "Hallam", but there is no known record of such a town's existence, and little is known about the early history of this district.

The exact boundaries of this historic district are unknown, but it is thought to have covered the parishes of Sheffield, Ecclesfield, and Bradfield—an area roughly equivalent to those parts of the present-day borough the City of Sheffield that lie to the west of the rivers Don and Sheaf that are within the pre-1974 boundaries of the ancient county of Yorkshire (later descriptions also include Brightside and the parish of Handsworth).[1].

Could it be possible then???

By 1296 a market had been established at what is now known as Castle Square,[5] and Sheffield subsequently grew into a small market town. In the 14th century Sheffield was already noted for the production of knives, as mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales,[6] and by 1600 it had become the main centre of cutlery production in England, overseen by The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire. From 1570 to 1584 Mary, Queen of Scots was held as a prisoner in Sheffield Castle and Sheffield Manor.[3]

The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire is a trade guild of metalworkers based in Sheffield, England. It was incorporated in 1624 by an Act of parliament. The head is called the Master Cutler. Their motto is Pour Y Parvenir a Bonne Foi (To Succeed through Honest Endeavour)

In the original act of Parliament, the company was given jurisdiction over

'all persons using to make Knives, Blades, Scissers, Sheeres, Sickles, Cutlery wares and all other wares and manufacture made or wrought of yron and steele, dwelling or inhabiting within the said Lordship and Liberty of Hallamshire, or within six miles compasse of the same'

This was expanded to include other trades by later acts, most notably steelmakers in 1860. In the same year the Company was given the right to veto any proposed name of a limited company anywhere in the United Kingdom which contains the word "Sheffield". They also supply marks to approved cutlers and promote Sheffield steelware.

The company has been based at Cutlers' Hall (opposite the cathedral on Church Street) since 1638. The current hall is the third to have been built on the site. The second was built in 1725 and the third in 1832. It was extended in 1867 and 1888. It is now a Grade II* listed building. It is used for formal functions and award ceremonies for local businesses.

Members of the company are called freemen and currently number 447. The Master Cutler is elected each year from the freemen within the company. He also has 2 Wardens, 6 Searchers and 24 Assistants.

The Company of Cutlers should not be confused with the Worshipful Company of Cutlers in London.

This probably wont get read but thought i was close anyway, to the infamous steel bank origin!!

would love to know more of the aula location or guesses where the real hallamshire lye, i live near rivelin anyway know of history of it or any old

maps???

would be mostly appreciatted

thanks again

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Guest bangtidy

Crookes is in hallam, yes get in :) also it says steel workers dating back to 1624 act of parliament, i believe this is before your 1637 map and this i think is why we have steel bank due to the origin of the good old,

The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire

found this:

Present day Hallam

Hallam has come to mean, broadly speaking, that area of Yorkshire in the foothills of the Peak District and southwest of the River Don. The region includes much of western Sheffield, and the parish of Bradfield. Suburbs and villages within this area include Bradfield, Broomhill, Crookes, Fulwood, Hillsborough, Loxley, Stannington, Strines, and Walkley.

A number of institutions, companies, and Public Houses use the "Hallam/shire" name to reflect their association with the Sheffield area :

The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire is a trade guild of steelworkers, founded in 1624 and based in Sheffield.

Sheffield Hallam is a Parliamentary constituency in western Sheffield, demographically one of the wealthiest such constituencies in Britain.

Hallamshire was a Parliamentary constituency from 1885 to 1918

The Diocese of Hallam is a Roman Catholic diocese in England, covering South Yorkshire, northern Derbyshire and northern Nottinghamshire. Its mother church is the Cathedral Church of St Marie in Sheffield.

Royal Hallamshire Hospital is a large hospital in the Broomhill district of Sheffield.

Sheffield Hallam University is one of the two universities in the City of Sheffield. Created when Sheffield City Polytechnic became a university in 1992, it took the name Hallam to distinguish it from the pre-existing University of Sheffield.

Hallam FM is a local radio station which broadcasts in Sheffield, Doncaster, and Barnsley.

The Hallam Line is a railway line that runs from Sheffield to Leeds via Barnsley.

Hallam F.C. is one of the oldest football clubs in the world.

The Hallamshire Lodge, freemasons lodge at Tapton Hall, Sheffield

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Guest bangtidy

thanks for the map and whats the grounds like as i was maybe going to go on the bike would that be appropriatte??

thanks again ;)

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Hi Bangtidy

Good question about where was Hallam. The other question is 'was there a village of Hallam?' There have been a lot of guesses including this one

Great Hallam Field and Hallam Fields are in Harrison's Survey of 1637, and it's known that Crookes had Open Fields, so it's a fair guess.

As to Roman Roads, there's another controversy. The old road over to Stanage isn't Roman, it's a mediaeval packhorse route, which may follow the line of a Roman Road. It's now believed by many that the Roman Road ran parallel but to the east, about on the line of the driveway that comes down to the dam just before you turn up the old road. There's yet another theory that it didn't come that way at all, but came from Hathersage via Wynyard's Nick, past Carl's Wark, up over Burbage Edge, then past Ringinglow and down to cross the Porter at Fulwood, and up to the ridge to join the route into Sheffield. There's also evidence of a Romano-British farm/settlement on the hill above Fulwood. Some probable R-B remains have been found (but now built over), and there are some field boundaries there which may well date to R-B times. Perhaps the road justifies its own topic?

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