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THORNSEAT LODGE - BRADFIELD

LOCATION

Thornseat Lodge, Mortimer Road,

Nr Agden Dam - past Bradfield

INFORMATION

Thornseat Lodge was originally built as a shooting lodge for William Jessop of steel making fame. It became a children's home in the 30's and remained as one up until the early 80's prior to it becoming derilict..

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Will be going up to Thornseat Lodge to try and grab some pics soon

Here's a taster of what's to come..

(this is a very spooky place - and the woods dont' help on the way to it)

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Went up there this afternoon with my brother, and boy is that place spooky..

The front door is wide open but I wasn't brave enough to go near it - the atmosphere around that place is doom, gloom and evil.

Being a former childrens place you would have thought it would give off a happy vibe but it was the opposite

There was even a sheep that had been recently brutally killed with a brick and a twist of it's neck (right round) and the same for a rabbit too who had met it's end very recently

I reckon there's some Bradfield witchcraft going on up there

It's easy to find, has easy access from the main road (entrance - gap in the wall) but I wouldn't recommend it unless you are one of those who are brave enough to tackle the haunted house type places.

Not sure if it's privately owned or private property so would definitely check before going

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been past this place do you know how long its been deralict looks lovely from front.

has it got any spooky history other than a childrens home nothing happened did it murders etc

was wondering if it was ever for sale and why it wasnt snapped up

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Built 1855, empty since early 80's ... apparently ...

More pictures here : http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/

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i lived there in 1975 it was one hell of a scary place,me and 9 other kids.the bloke who used to own it was called pete liniker.

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I stayed at the lodge in about 1956 with my 2 sisters. My memories are of a very happy place if you had to be in a home at all. My mam was in hospital to have a baby and she would not leave us with neighbors and she had no other family. It was run by women, no men on the staff and it was based on more "modern" principles where the kids were encouraged to use it as their home. I also stayed in Fulwood Cottage Homes twice before and I can tell you Thornseat lodge was a much better place than Fulwood.

I visited Thornseat in 2005 while on holiday in Enland (I live in Australia) and I didnt find it scary, just very sad. I did a bit of research at the Sheffield Central library and it appears that it is still owned by the Council. I think it's a shame that it has been allowed to fall into ruin but I suppose its the same for Millhouses paddling pools and lots of other Council owned properties. :(

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Thanks John

I'm not sure that the council still owns it as (if I remember correctly) I thought was now owned by a farmer/countryside resident who takes great offence to anyone stating that the place has been let to go to ruin a little

A great investment I'm sure - but it certainly needs a lot of work

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Thornseats lodge was sold in the mid 80's to a local businessman, he also owns the old waterworks, the old school and house and Wilkin hill centre and numerous other buildings around Bradfield. All, except the old school have had the roofs removed and just left to fall down. It is such a shame that not only are these building left in this condition, but it gives a bad stain of unsightly veiwing to such a beautiful area.

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I have seen the owner getting quite heated in online discussions about these buildings and getting angry when people complain of them going to ruin...

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i lived there in 1975 it was one hell of a scary place,me and 9 other kids.the bloke who used to own it was called pete liniker.

Pete Liniker was never the owner but was the caretaker at the Lodge until it closed. He carried on living in the caretakers' house after the close of the children's home closed but sadly he died a few years ago

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Pete Liniker was never the owner but was the caretaker at the Lodge until it closed. He carried on living in the caretakers' house after the close of the children's home closed but sadly he died a few years ago

Pete liniker was the caretaker and a member of staff. Pete was a good straight talking man, i have fond memories of him playing/singing Mull of kintyre with his guitar. I was in Thornseat lodge 1977-78 and my memories of the place are really good. Its my understanding the lodge is to be demolished but it will collapse soon, real shame.

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There is not plans for Thornseats lodge at present, but like you say, if nothing to done soon it will just colllapse which is such a shame

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Unfortunately, this seems to be the answer for so many "problem" buildings....leave them to the elements, then condemn them as unsafe and demolish. Sad but true

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Here are some pics of other building owned by the same owner as Thornseats lodge. Its a shame that these building are left in such a state. The first few are the old waterworks in Bradfield village, and the last are of the Wilkin Hill centre.

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Wow what a beautiful building but what a waste. Very spooky pictures you must be very brave to go there!!!

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Hi folks, I lived at Thornseat Lodge in the earlt '60's and it was run by Miss Brunt. I was very happy there. I also lived at Tapton and hated it. The property is owned by Hague Construction according to Land Registry this morning and I have contacted them about it's future. Please watch this space.

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Hi folks, I lived at Thornseat Lodge in the earlt '60's and it was run by Miss Brunt. I was very happy there. I also lived at Tapton and hated it. The property is owned by Hague Construction according to Land Registry this morning and I have contacted them about it's future. Please watch this space.

There seems to be a growing amount of people that are intrested in Thornseat lodge. Lets hope something is done before it completely collapses. I have viewed the place a couple of times quite recently and its heartbreaking to see its present state.

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Hi. I'm new on here, but this topic has raised some thoughts and I felt I needed to reply.

I am only 18, so the lodge has always been derelict to me. From what I understand, it has never belonged to the local authorities, but been in the posession of the Fitzwilliam(Wentworth) Estates, who are also responsible for the plantations around the lodge.

Although time has worn justly on the upstairs of the lodge, the cellars tell a very different and chilling story, but down there the grandeur of the lodge still remains, in a much less obvious way. Now I went down there with someone who knows the building very well, and from recent structural reports knows which load bearing walls are safe to walk behind and where the weak points of the building are. The cellar is a facinating place but a very dangerous one, and I would not reccomend anyone in here to venture down there, not least because without a tourch, it is the kind of place where you could be lost for days.

As with regards to the state of the place, Thornseat Lodge is now structurally unsound, the cellars show deep and worrying cracks, and the top half is but a shell, to restore the lodge would be nothing less than a rebuild, one of which its owner has no need for. As with many of the large, rural esates, profit is never to be made by selling land of assets, not even such treasures as Thornseat, as it cuts up land and causes huge problems, especially in a place such as this.

The problems would then also be that the kind of person who would buy this would be a developer, and for any profit fueled person, a single house would not make financial sense, and so the property would most probably become a flurry of flats.

Whilst I love the building, it must be realised that its place was in history, as a building which now has much more call in the urban areas, and perhaps to redo this lodge would take away all its sparkle and grandeur.

Whilst I accept a lot of people must drive past and wonder why the hell it isn't being used, you have to really understand the estate manager's task in running such a large rural business, for them, this is something unfortunate. But it is a given that Thornseat had its day, and the hunting lodge it was originally built for would now only work if it was sat on a glen in Scotland's finest shooting country. It is such a huge shame when things go this way, especially something as magical as Thornseat, I just feel fortunate I still get to explore it.

If you look at some of the shots below, you can see the crest above the entrance.

I have some pictures of it from this January when we were fnecing up there, so will post them also:

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Hi. I'm new on here, but this topic has raised some thoughts and I felt I needed to reply.

I am only 18, so the lodge has always been derelict to me. From what I understand, it has never belonged to the local authorities, but been in the posession of the Fitzwilliam(Wentworth) Estates, who are also responsible for the plantations around the lodge.

Although time has worn justly on the upstairs of the lodge, the cellars tell a very different and chilling story, but down there the grandeur of the lodge still remains, in a much less obvious way. Now I went down there with someone who knows the building very well, and from recent structural reports knows which load bearing walls are safe to walk behind and where the weak points of the building are. The cellar is a facinating place but a very dangerous one, and I would not reccomend anyone in here to venture down there, not least because without a tourch, it is the kind of place where you could be lost for days.

As with regards to the state of the place, Thornseat Lodge is now structurally unsound, the cellars show deep and worrying cracks, and the top half is but a shell, to restore the lodge would be nothing less than a rebuild, one of which its owner has no need for. As with many of the large, rural esates, profit is never to be made by selling land of assets, not even such treasures as Thornseat, as it cuts up land and causes huge problems, especially in a place such as this.

The problems would then also be that the kind of person who would buy this would be a developer, and for any profit fueled person, a single house would not make financial sense, and so the property would most probably become a flurry of flats.

Whilst I love the building, it must be realised that its place was in history, as a building which now has much more call in the urban areas, and perhaps to redo this lodge would take away all its sparkle and grandeur.

Whilst I accept a lot of people must drive past and wonder why the hell it isn't being used, you have to really understand the estate manager's task in running such a large rural business, for them, this is something unfortunate. But it is a given that Thornseat had its day, and the hunting lodge it was originally built for would now only work if it was sat on a glen in Scotland's finest shooting country. It is such a huge shame when things go this way, especially something as magical as Thornseat, I just feel fortunate I still get to explore it.

If you look at some of the shots below, you can see the crest above the entrance.

I have some pictures of it from this January when we were fnecing up there, so will post them also:

The lodge is not currently in the posession of the Fitzwilliam's Estates as you have stated in your topic, it did belong to Sheffield City Council and ran as a children's home for many years until it was closed down and sold to a local businessman. Sorry to correct you, but didn't want people getting the wrong information about the place

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