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This is how Leopold Street used to look

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5fb150bb8d5a9c618b4f619f7e1ff132.jpg

Open up this photo and take a look at this Sheffield scene of Leopald Street in Sheffield City Centre.

How things have changed! Totally different now of course. On the right is the Three Tuns Public House.

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A great photograph, so little motor traffic, so I thought that it would be nice to add another, roughly contemporary image (30/09/1960), showing the opposite side of the road. The Grand Hotel is now sadly, long gone. The destination board of the tram-car, No.100, reads Millhouses. This particular tram-car was built by Sheffield Corporation in 1942, in order to replace an earlier vehicle, carrying the same number, and which had been destroyed in the blitz of 1940.

Incidentally, should it be Leopold Street, not Leopald Street? Or, do we have a choice?

PT120-Sheffield Transport No.100 Passing The Grand Hotel, Leopold Street, Sheffield-30-09-1960 - Web Copy.jpg

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46 minutes ago, Sheffield History said:

5fb150bb8d5a9c618b4f619f7e1ff132.jpg

Open up this photo and take a look at this Sheffield scene of Leopald Street in Sheffield City Centre.

How things have changed! Totally different now of course. On the right is the Three Tuns Public House.

Looks like  1950's to me.  I remember that the shop where Kate Saxon's is in the 1960's achieved some fame as it displayed a topless dress in the window. My girl friend  (now wife) & me were passing it on way to Berni Inn  (I think that's what it was) for a steak.

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Leopold Street surely, was it not named after Prince Leopold, son of Queen Victoria?

EDIT - I think it may have been due to him opening Firth College on the corner of West Street.

 

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I have a feeling having read somewhere that the Leopold in question was a German princeling and not one of Victoria's brood.

The jewellers in the picture( you can just make out the sign) was where I obtained my first watch. It had luminescent  dots and my mother carefully removed  them when she read that they were all radio-active....as well as on the hands...Bless her!

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2 hours ago, lysander said:

I have a feeling having read somewhere that the Leopold in question was a German princeling and not one of Victoria's brood.

The jewellers in the picture( you can just make out the sign) was where I obtained my first watch. It had luminescent  dots and my mother carefully removed  them when she read that they were all radio-active....as well as on the hands...Bless her!

This is the Leopold I was referring to  

QUOTE     Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, KG, KT, GCSI, GCMG, GCStJ (Leopold George Duncan Albert; 7 April 1853 – 28 March 1884) was the eighth child and youngest son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Leopold was later created Duke of Albany, Earl of Clarence, and Baron Arklow. He had haemophilia, which led to his death at the age of 30.   UNQUOTE

Link here       ------------          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Leopold,_Duke_of_Albany

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Thanks for clarifying that for me.

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We would occasionally go into the Grand Hotel late 60s. I recall there was a bar on the first floor called the Gold Room (??)

As callow youths we would be trying to impress the young ladies, much to the amusement of the regulars.

Later it became the site of the Buccaneer, - but was that in the cellar of the old hotel?

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On 10/6/2017 at 08:14, Unitedite Returns said:

A great photograph, so little motor traffic, so I thought that it would be nice to add another, roughly contemporary image (30/09/1960), showing the opposite side of the road. The Grand Hotel is now sadly, long gone. The destination board of the tram-car, No.100, reads Millhouses. This particular tram-car was built by Sheffield Corporation in 1942, in order to replace an earlier vehicle, carrying the same number, and which had been destroyed in the blitz of 1940.

Incidentally, should it be Leopold Street, not Leopald Street? Or, do we have a choice?

PT120-Sheffield Transport No.100 Passing The Grand Hotel, Leopold Street, Sheffield-30-09-1960 - Web Copy.jpg

To the left of the steps going up in to the Grand Hotel are the steps going down to the Buccaneer bar in the late 1960s / early 1970s, possibly not at the time this picture was taken.

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On 6 October 2017 at 20:21, lysander said:

I have a feeling having read somewhere that the Leopold in question was a German princeling and not one of Victoria's brood.

The jewellers in the picture( you can just make out the sign) was where I obtained my first watch. It had luminescent  dots and my mother carefully removed  them when she read that they were all radio-active....as well as on the hands...Bless her!

The Jewelers was H L Browns, I bought my wife's wedding ring there.

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On 06/10/2017 at 07:32, Sheffield History said:

5fb150bb8d5a9c618b4f619f7e1ff132.jpg

Open up this photo and take a look at this Sheffield scene of Leopald Street in Sheffield City Centre.

How things have changed! Totally different now of course. On the right is the Three Tuns Public House.

What are peoples thoughts on this? I zoomed in and found someone who seems to have no head.

C2E391B5-8909-40EC-A104-2183DD869113.jpeg

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I'm amused by that little boy who, in Just William style, has one sock pulled up and the other at half-mast - but he does look to me as if he has a head.

So, would the City Hall be off to the left of the photo, or have I got it the wrong way round?

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1 hour ago, Athy said:

So, would the City Hall be off to the left of the photo?

Yes, I believe so.

Im guessing the gap in the building line leads to what is Now Orchard Square.

Todays view is something like this, but this view is taken from slightly further back along Leopold St...

59df8e3eb94b0_ScreenShot2017-10-12at16_45_13.png.17c7d7cb3f4fe324193d5e9cac7853e8.png

 

5fb150bb8d5a9c618b4f619f7e1ff132.jpg

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I see there is another thread about the Buccaneer bub, presumably the Hotel bar I remember became the Captain's Cabin.

The photo shows a Blue Gillette sign in the cellar windows, so this was probably a barber's shop when the photo was taken?

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Apart from H L Brown there was another, smaller, jeweller on Leopold Street in the 1940/50's . I wonder if anyone can remember it's name?

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I worked at Wilson Peck on the corner of Leopold Street and Barkers Pool and used to nip across the road after work for a few pints in the Three Tuns.

That was 1963 - 64. 

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On 15 October 2017 at 08:39, lysander said:

Apart from H L Brown there was another, smaller, jeweller on Leopold Street in the 1940/50's . I wonder if anyone can remember it's name?

Was it Leopold Bullion?

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That's not the name I have hidden away in the depths of my memory but thanks for suggesting it.

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The small jewellers shop on Leopold Street was Alexander Bortner.

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Thank you...that's the one!

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I remember another jewellers there late 60's "Ingrams" They had a very pretty girl working there "Jackie" who we referred to as Ms. Ingram before discovering her actual name!

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