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Ball Inn Wicker


duckweed
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I have been given Victorian legal documents pertaining to Ball Inn and Brewhouse and stable and outbuildings on the Wicker for 1861 and 1868. Are the buildings now demolished? Are there any photos of the Inn or any interesting stories about it? 

 

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It says bounded or towards the north east by ground and buildings formerly sold to William Wiley but now belonging to Mrs or Messrs Osborne on or towards the North West by the Wicker aforesaid on or towards the South East by the Tail Goight running from the Wicker Tilt and down towards the south west by ground and buildings formerly sold to Mary Perry but now belonging to Thomas Jenkinson and containing in the whole one hundred and sixty one superficial square yards or thereabouts and also all that messuage or dwelling house now used as a public house and called the Ball House formerly in two tenements with the brewhouse, stable and outbuilding thereto.   

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This is 68 Wicker and obviously been a pub by the decoration over the doorway. So was this the Ball?

DSCF9744.JPG

DSCF9746.JPG

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This is 68 Wicker and obviously been a pub by the decoration over the doorway. So was this the Ball?

DSCF9744.JPG

DSCF9746.JPG

​No, that's the Brown Cow, that was :-)

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It says bounded or towards the north east by ground and buildings formerly sold to William Wiley but now belonging to Mrs or Messrs Osborne on or towards the North West by the Wicker aforesaid on or towards the South East by the Tail Goight running from the Wicker Tilt and down towards the south west by ground and buildings formerly sold to Mary Perry but now belonging to Thomas Jenkinson and containing in the whole one hundred and sixty one superficial square yards or thereabouts and also all that messuage or dwelling house now used as a public house and called the Ball House formerly in two tenements with the brewhouse, stable and outbuilding thereto.   

​Hence the named "Willey Street", do you think?

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I would think so. Obviously it is Messrs Osborne as it is the works they are talking about. I love the way the area for the pub is described as superficial square yards.

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^                           ^                          ^

Edward Lambert, landlord/keeper, 1885.     A-Z updated.

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The Sheffield & Rotherham Independent (Sheffield, England), Wednesday, August 18, 1886;

Sudden Death in the Wicker.

Ball.thumb.jpg.38bb2f3d79875373fbbdcf2ad

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The Sheffield & Rotherham Independent (Sheffield, England), Monday, January 09, 1893; pg. 8; Issue 11978.

SUPPOSED SUICIDE IN SHEFFIELD

SHIN-1893-01-09-0008-F.thumb.jpg.775a35c

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I have a copy of a map of the Wicker showing Osbornes steel works and the Dannamora steel works of Seebohm & Dieckstahl. The map must be pre 1914 as Seebohm & Dieckstahl changed their name to Arthur Balfour because of anti-German feeling after the onset of the First World War, it also shows Slack & Sellars Saw works, all the furnaces, stables, grinding wheels etc are shown. All the pubs are shown as are shops and courts.

Map Of Wicker.jpg

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