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History dude

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History dude

Just found this:

Sheffield and her whistle, or, The first fruits of the corporation : to the worshipful Thomas Dunn, Alderman of the Park Ward (1843)

http://www.archive.org/details/sheffieldherwhis99robe

Plus this:

Description of a Sounding Board in Attercliffe Church, Invented by the Rev. John Blackburn, Minister of Attercliffe-Cum-Darnall, Sheffield (January 1, 1828)

http://www.archive.org/details/philtrans02807861

There are also lots of books added on Sheffield Plate for those interested.

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vox

We've visited Mr Blackburn before HD :)

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duckweed

I read the pamphlet on Alderman Dunn and wonder if someone can give me more background on it?

I know that it is referring to the Parker Shore Bank which collapsed and have read the newspaper articles about this. Montgomery supporting the Shores as honourable. There was a court case in which Shore was present at Leeds and very harsh things were said, and likewise the writer of the pamphlet.

I have read letters in Sheffield Archives about the collapse and it shows a more human side to this. A letter saying that it was time that the old man faced facts and sold up to pay the debts because if he didn't he would lose his friends too. The Shores estates were considerable and it was doubtful they made any great profit from the bank and they virtually lost everything. I am not sure about the Parkers.

The Shores hung on because of the 2 maiden ladies at Meersbrook House who were willed an annuity by their father and Meersbrook House. There was a court case at chancery to establish that what had been willed to them was before the bank crashed and should remain till the ladies died. So certainly not a case of arrogance but a desperate attempt to stop 2 old ladies being thrown on the street.

Unlike modern bankers there was actually no evidence of overspending or reckless lending but a steep downturn in overseas trade which meant that many people were left unable to repay their debts.

I recommend reading the letters in the Archive as well as the newspaper articles as it gives an interesting insight into the problems of early banking.

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History dude

I read the pamphlet on Alderman Dunn and wonder if someone can give me more background on it?

I know that it is referring to the Parker Shore Bank which collapsed and have read the newspaper articles about this. Montgomery supporting the Shores as honourable. There was a court case in which Shore was present at Leeds and very harsh things were said, and likewise the writer of the pamphlet.

I have read letters in Sheffield Archives about the collapse and it shows a more human side to this. A letter saying that it was time that the old man faced facts and sold up to pay the debts because if he didn't he would lose his friends too. The Shores estates were considerable and it was doubtful they made any great profit from the bank and they virtually lost everything. I am not sure about the Parkers.

The Shores hung on because of the 2 maiden ladies at Meersbrook House who were willed an annuity by their father and Meersbrook House. There was a court case at chancery to establish that what had been willed to them was before the bank crashed and should remain till the ladies died. So certainly not a case of arrogance but a desperate attempt to stop 2 old ladies being thrown on the street.

Unlike modern bankers there was actually no evidence of overspending or reckless lending but a steep downturn in overseas trade which meant that many people were left unable to repay their debts.

I recommend reading the letters in the Archive as well as the newspaper articles as it gives an interesting insight into the problems of early banking.

I can throw some light on the Parker family. At the time they were living at Woodthorpe Hall and Hugh Parker was a well respected man. His son was John Parker who was the first MP for Sheffield in the the 1832 election. However the bank's downfall was also the Parker's and they had to sell Woodthorpe Hall the same year. I think they moved to Doncaster?

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duckweed

There was a Miss Parker at Norton Lees. I think possibly Cliffield House. There was definitely Parker land that came up for sale the same time as the Shores.

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