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ukelele lady

Colliery near Mosborough

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Was there any coal pits around where the Mosborough Police Station is today?

There was Birley East in the valley between Hackenthorpe and Woodhouse ( there's a topic on here somewhere ) and I have a book about Birley East

If it was not so late I would mark it on a map for you, if nobody else has done it I will tomorrow night.

The only other was at Mosborough Moor, on the left as you go down the A616 into Mosborough.

They are the only 2 I can remember, Vox is your man he's older than me :rolleyes: and lived at hackenthorpe earlier.

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They're the only 2 I can remember that were close by. (But when has that been something you could stake a quid on ? ) :wacko:

The whole area around there is so vastly different to when I used to roam around the woods and fields as a kid. I have a job placing where everything used to be.

Such a shame there seem to be so few surviving photos of those places. I was lead to believe that someone had the elusive picture of Cotleigh House but it never materialised. I live in hope. (Not the place near Castleton lol )

By the bye, I just saw Carter lodge on the map. It looks as though it was in the middle of the shops at the top of Dyke Vale. Halfway down Four Wells Drive. It had gone by the time we moved there in 1953. Seems odd that they would name the school after it, it being so far away.

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There was Birley East in the valley between Hackenthorpe and Woodhouse ( there's a topic on here somewhere ) and I have a book about Birley East

If it was not so late I would mark it on a map for you, if nobody else has done it I will tomorrow night.

The only other was at Mosborough Moor, on the left as you go down the A616 into Mosborough.

They are the only 2 I can remember, Vox is your man he's older than me :rolleyes: and lived at hackenthorpe earlier.

That's the one I'm after, Mosborough Moor. I'm trying to pin point the exact or more or

less the exact spot where it were.

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Just checked the map it is marked, as I said on the left just before the houses/ circular rds

Should be able to find on google sv

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Looking at google the land is still not built on

Just after Moorside Close

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Besides Mosborough

There was Birley West, Birley East and, come to think of it, there was a Birley Vale colliery as well.

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Besides Mosborough

There was Birley West, Birley East and, come to think of it, there was a Birley Vale colliery as well.

Was there a colliery somewhere between Birley Lane and Ridgeway/High Lane

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Was there a colliery somewhere between Birley Lane and Ridgeway/High Lane

It's hazy but I can picture a tall structure, maybe a winding wheel, up on the right, after the bottom of Birley Lane.

Although, if indeed it was there, it could perhaps have been a small shaft into one of the other pits.

---------------------------

There must have been a pit somewhere very near to where the "red hills" used to be, on the left down Linley Lane.

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It's hazy but I can picture a tall structure, maybe a winding wheel, up on the right, after the bottom of Birley Lane.

Although, if indeed it was there, it could perhaps have been a small shaft into one of the other pits.

---------------------------

There must have been a pit somewhere very near to where the "red hills" used to be, on the left down Linley Lane.

Was that Birley West at the bottom of Lindley Lane

Edited by Stuart0742
Posts split from Map Topic

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Was that Birley West at the bottom of Lindley Lane

Taken from "Winding Up" A History of Birley East Colliery by A Rowles

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The entrance of the Mosborough Moor Colliery site was roughly opposite the British Oak Public House.

It was fronted by a stone wall, which is still extant and if you look at that wall, you can see that the central portion is quite new, whereas the two "wings" are visibly much older. This new section, which marks the former entry to the now demolished colliery site, was added when the cleared site was developed for private housing.

The colliery was in private ownership and was operated by Moorside Mining Company Limited and ceased operation in the very early 1980's. The address was Moorside Colliery, Mosborough Moor, Mosborough, S19 5AY. Telephone 0742 485566 and 486472. The Directors are listed as P Roberts, A Roberts and N Roberts. The Company Registration Number was 1011163

The colliery was a drift mine and I visited the site shortly after closure and shortly before demolition. One of the photographs that I took is attached. If you are interested, I will scan and attach some more.

There was also a quantity of documentation scattered about the site, which I salvaged for posterity. I tried to scan a copy of one document to attach, but the reproduction was poor.

Kindest regards;

N

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The entrance of the Mosborough Moor Colliery site was roughly opposite the British Oak Public House.

The British Oak is a pub well known to Stuart.

He has a certificate for eating their "hungry man special", a mixed grill meal about 10 times the normal size and worth several thousand Calories.

What's more, in the 1970's my brother had a girlfriend who was the daughter of the British Oak landlords and she had a horse which she kept in the pub grounds.

On one memorable Sunday morning she visited our house on the Arbourthorne, making the journey on horseback and leaving it in our back garden.

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That's great work Unitedite.

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Taken from "Winding Up" A History of Birley East Colliery by A Rowles

Hence the Red Hills. - Nice one Stuart

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The entrance of the Mosborough Moor Colliery site was roughly opposite the British Oak Public House.

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Update - A little further research [a quick internet search in fact] reveals that Moorside Mining Company Limited continues to exist even to this day!

See link http://www.moorsidem....uk/contact.htm

& www.moorsidemining.co.uk/aboutus.

Edited by SteveHB
second link added

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In order to give a little context to the above photograph, I have coloured the building shown in blue, on the attached plan.

I have also put an arrow on the plan, showing the direction in which the photograph was taken.

Kind regards;

N

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Here are some more photographs of Moorside Colliery that were taken during its’ demolition stages.

These cottages although set back by the yard in the foreground of the photograph, fronted onto Mosboro Moor. From the photograph, it is apparent that they had not been occupied for some considerable time and I think that they were possibly used for equipment storage and office accommodation in later years.

A different view of the cottages, which were located on the left hand side of the access road. The coal screens and bunkers illustrated previously are visible in the middle distance.

A view from the back of the screens and bunkers and looking back towards Mosboro Moor. The wagons have lost their wheels, as the scrap recovery process has already commenced.

A view from the back of the screens and bunkers and looking away from Mosboro Moor. The adits have been filled in by this stage. I believe that the entry to one adit may have been somewhere behind the last of the part-scrapped wagons.

These semi-derelict wagons were found partially obscured by tree growth at the very top of the yard and the photograph is taken looking away from Mosboro Moor.

Kind regards;

N

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Thank you Unitedite Returns. the photographs are very interesting.

Could you tell me if this is the same Colliery they called the Swallow's Colliery?

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Thank you very much for your very kind words.

I do know that Richard and John F. Swallow were colliery proprietors in the Mosborough area in the latter part of the 19th Century, but I do not know as to whether they ever owned, or operated the Moorside Colliery.

I will have a look in my books at home, but I must admit that in my lifetime, I have never heard of Moorside being called Swallow's Colliery. That does not necessarily mean however, that it wasn't.

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I suppose that I should have researched a little more before giving you an answer, but I suppose that "post in haste and repent at leisure" <_<

There is the following article, which I have posted in part and which would seem to give some credence to the supposition that Moorside was formerly known as Swallow's Colliery.

Derbyshire Times.

Saturday 8th. October 1859.

Page 2 Col. 5 to Page 3 Col. 2.

The late Colliery Accident at Mosboro'.

Inquest on the Bodies.

The adjournment inquiry touching the deaths of Naboth Kirkby, aged 19 years, and Hugh Bird, aged 17 years, who were killed at the recent accident at the Silkstone Main Colliery, Mosborough Moor, was opened on Wednesday at the house of Mr. Booth, The British Oak Inn, Mosborough, before C.S.B. Busby, Esq., of Chesterfield, and a respectable jury.

There were present Mr. Hedley, of Derby, the Government Inspector of Mines; Mr. Seymour, colliery owner(?), Staveley; and Mr. J. Swallow, one of the proprietors of the pit.

The inquiry, it will be remembered, was adjourned from Saturday, the 10th. of September (the accident having occurred two days previous), in order that time might be allowed for the recovery of other two bodies present in the pit; but owing to the accumulation of bad air in the workings of the pit, and the inefficient sate of the ventilation no one has since been able to reach the bottom of the shaft, and consequently the bodies still remain there.

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