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I've Found Somewhere My Scooter Can't Go


hilldweller
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I shouldn't think the couple of amps extra load would make much difference to battery voltage and hence scooter speed. I think the lighting is there to comply with the letter of the law and not a lot more.

HD

In that case I don't think there is much wrong with your battery charge capacity and the likelihood of you being left stranded with flat batteries which are not covered by call out insurance is fairly remote.

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I'm afraid that pub trips after dark are off the menu nowadays, with the price of draught pub beer going in to the stratosphere I'd rather relax in my own home with a bottle of decent real ale. Never been a big drinker, well I am a big drinker but I don't drink much.

HD

Much to the dismay of my medical staff, and much to the pleasure of my son in law who brought it about, after 10 years without doing it I have gone back to brewing my own beer, lager, cider and wine. It was my son in law wanting to try it for the first time, asking me how to go about it and finally letting me sample his first attempts that got me back into it again. Fortunately I had kept all my brewing equipment in the garage and after a quick wash and sterilisation it was quickly back in action again.

As you say hilldweller it is much cheaper than the boozer per pint / glass and you can enjoy it in the comfort of your own home.

It also avoids having to walk to the boozer and the car is safely parked up at home as drinking and driving should NEVER go together.

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Just to add a final post-script to my mobility scooter saga.

I popped to the local shops on it this morning, as I was driving down the slight slope the usual whining noise when the motor is re-generating into the batteries, changed to silence and the scooter began to accelerate. It then suddenly went back to normal. I took it to bits when I got back and found that one of the motor brush-boxes had slid out of the motor housing and allowed the brush to make intermittent contact. It appeared to be fastened in by adhesive 'so I fastened it back with a superior epoxy resin and hopefully that will be the end of the problem. Of course, I shall be wary of taking it a distance until I can be sure it wont happen again. It looks like I shall be driving in ever decreasing circles around the immediate neighbourhood just as we were discussing.

HD

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Just to add a final post-script to my mobility scooter saga.

I popped to the local shops on it this morning, as I was driving down the slight slope the usual whining noise when the motor is re-generating into the batteries, changed to silence and the scooter began to accelerate. It then suddenly went back to normal. I took it to bits when I got back and found that one of the motor brush-boxes had slid out of the motor housing and allowed the brush to make intermittent contact. It appeared to be fastened in by adhesive 'so I fastened it back with a superior epoxy resin and hopefully that will be the end of the problem. Of course, I shall be wary of taking it a distance until I can be sure it wont happen again. It looks like I shall be driving in ever decreasing circles around the immediate neighbourhood just as we were discussing.

HD

Held together with a bit of glue! :blink:

Good job it's not an American made scooter, they would have fixed it in place with a piece of bazooka Joe chewing gum lol

You'll be telling me that used to make aircraft out of wood, canvas and string next. :P

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Held together with a bit of glue! :blink:

Good job it's not an American made scooter, they would have fixed it in place with a piece of bazooka Joe chewing gum lol

You'll be telling me that used to make aircraft out of wood, canvas and string next. :P

I think you'll find that the studs that hold the cylinder head down on your car are held in with "a bit of glue". Years ago the studs would be threaded at both ends but nowadays the engine block is bored out with clearance holes and the plain end of the stud "glued" in with a Loctite type material. Some Glue :o

HD

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I think you'll find that the studs that hold the cylinder head down on your car are held in with "a bit of glue". Years ago the studs would be threaded at both ends but nowadays the engine block is bored out with clearance holes and the plain end of the stud "glued" in with a Loctite type material. Some Glue :o

HD

Some glue OK

Most glues, even the epoxy glues and superglues, cannot cope with high temperatures, rapid variations in temperature and stress levels and the presence of oil without eventually failing.

Must be some customised formula designed for just that purpose.

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Some glue OK

Most glues, even the epoxy glues and superglues, cannot cope with high temperatures, rapid variations in temperature and stress levels and the presence of oil without eventually failing.

Must be some customised formula designed for just that purpose.

Just had a look at a specification sheet for one compound and according to that it's good up to 230 degrees Celsius and has a shear strength not less than 3000 PSI. Small amounts of oil during assembly are not a problem. The oil temperature in my car peaks at around 95 degrees and the water temperature at around 80 degrees.

HD

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Just had a look at a specification sheet for one compound and according to that it's good up to 230 degrees Celsius and has a shear strength not less than 3000 PSI. Small amounts of oil during assembly are not a problem. The oil temperature in my car peaks at around 95 degrees and the water temperature at around 80 degrees.

HD

Like we said, it sure is some glue.

The wonders of modern chemistry.

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A quick lesson in LOGARITHMS for our younger members (those under 50 who have had always had the luxury of a personal electronic calculator}

Lesson by

Professor DaveH of the University of Arbourthorne (a close rival to Oxford and Cambridge)

Professor Stuart0742 of the University of Hackenthorpe (origin of the famous work the Hackenthorpe Book Of Lies)

LOGARITHMS

When Noah's Ark finally came to rest at the Mansfield Road / Hollinsend Road crossroads after 40 days in the flood Noah released all the animals he had saved, a male and female of each species, and he said unto them "Go forth and MULTIPLY, and repopulate this barren land". (Well, - it was Mansfield Road!)

Now on the ark Noah had a pair of snakes, and these snakes were ADDERS

The ADDERS had a problem, they couldn't MULTIPLY as Noah had told them to, they could only ADD.

This unfortunate situation persisted until the 17th century when a mathematician called Napier devised LOGARITHMS

LOGARITHMS allowed the ADDERS to MULTIPLY just by ADDING

They also allowed the SUBTRACTERS to DIVIDE.

Those that could already MULTIPLY could now be RAISED TO POWERS

Those that could already DIVIDE could now be ROOTED

So one way or another everyone was happy, all thanks to LOGARITHMS

In the nineteenth century along came another mathematician called Euler who was on to a good NUMBER,

He came up with NATURAL LOGARITHMS which then allowed RECIPROCAL FUNCTIONS to be INTEGRATED.

Just found out today that next school year (ie September) we have to offer a supporting course of "mathematics for A level scientists" where we teach our A-level science students how to handle the maths required to pass science.

That doesn't say a lot about the school maths department does it! :( , even though we have a very good maths department.

We discussed what topics we would want to include in this short maths course, and one of the suggestions from one of my fellow chemists was logarithms because calculation of pH (how acid / alkali a solution is) uses logarithms.

For the chemists out there, pH = -log[H+]

Now if someone "volunteers" ME to be the one to teach it I know exactly how to introduce the topic in a humerous, light hearted way ;-)

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