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    SteveHB

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 18/05/20 in Posts

  1. Here are a selection of paintings by a Sheffield artist who was active in the very early 1800's, W Botham. There's not much information available but apart from the late birth date I'd say he was William Hallam Botham, born 23rd April 1790 to Eleanor and George Botham. George Botham was a Confectioner and Glass and China merchant in 1792, based at Irish Cross, selling raisins, nuts, lemons, prunes etc. In August 1797 the business was at 14 Market Place. William Botham was a fellow apprentice of Francis Chantrey when they were both at Ramsey's carver and gilder, High Street. Later, Cha
    6 points
  2. Hello I just finished writing the code for this Watermills of Sheffield page, it's an interactive map showing all the locations of the watermills listed in the book 'The Water-Mills of Sheffield' by W.T. Miller published in 1947. Tap on a mill for its name, and tap on the name for the description from the book. https://www.g7smy.co.uk/history/watermills/ I've written it for use on a mobile phone, for when you are out and about, and on this the GPS can be used to show your location. It will also work with a desktop PC. Thanks Karl.
    6 points
  3. Further to my June 3rd post about the European Heritage Days awards I'm excited and delighted to be one of the overall 2020 winners! Eleven storytellers from across the continent have won a funded Council of Europe heritage project. Mine is going to be the design of an app and website to help count and trace every single piece of historic pavement furniture in the city and to plot every such location. This will hopefully enable study of what we have, why they are important, and what they tell us. Building on the collective work of this thread I will be able to answer a few of the question
    6 points
  4. I don't know whether it's to do with the lockdown & Covid precautions and we are mainly staying at home but much of the site recently, has been taken up with photo's, videos etc of what's happening in the city centre now. Others may feel differently but I personally am not the slightest bit interested in today's modern Sheffield because I feel that the council and planners have ripped the heart out of everything this city meant to me. There was a bit of chat about the old Coles Bros etc but many seem not to care too much about the resulting demise of John Lewis and think it was t
    5 points
  5. Another photo, the ford is paved and as said is in good condition, this is taken from the Beeley Wood Lane side, have to try and get to the other bank and look for the track up to the toll house.
    5 points
  6. This is a transcription of an autobiography, typed by Joseph in 1927 when he was 81. Much of it was included by Jack Branston in his History of Stocksbridge but this is from Joseph's original book and contains other material not included there. The autobiography contains details on Hathersage, Stocksbridge, Deepcar and the Fox works at Stocksbridge, and provides a few personal recollections of individuals as well. Joseph Sheldon: Reminiscences. 1845 - 1927 Early Days 1. The writer of these pages was born at Booths, Hathersage, on September 28th, 1845, being the sixth son in a fa
    4 points
  7. Just found this picture of the Albert Hall amongst my mother-in-laws old photos - it says it was taken just after the fire
    4 points
  8. I could never understand, in fact I still don’t, as to why the council allowed the destruction of all the old Victorian shops on Pinstone Street including the Cambridge Arcade, then add insult to injury allow the horrible buildings that were put up in their place. Thanks to picture Sheffield.
    4 points
  9. Hello All, I'm delighted to say that I have been shortlisted for European Heritage Storyteller of the Year for 'Drainspotting'. The link here is the just published submission which formed the final part of the process. There are now just 20 stories left in the contest (of which I am one) and the final 10 are announced later this month. Hopefully there will more updates to follow but thank you very much to all the people who contributed to this long running thread which was part of my story and supporting evidence https://www.europeanheritagedays.com/Story/cfbd0/Drainspotting-%40%40%40-A-
    4 points
  10. I recall having just passed the dreaded 11 plus back in 54 and was destined for the "Redcaps". That summer, a group of us...all off to different schools in September.. decided that this would doubtless be our last summer of "playing around". ( how wrong we were) We constructed a trench system, of sorts, on Hartley Brook and spent ,what seemed like weeks, firing off masses of caps at one another. We then in a moment of inspiration diverted the meandering "Brook" and gave the old Wortley Rural District a few square yards of extra land. The semi drained WW2 static water tank was reflooded , by d
    3 points
  11. Once again, I found your video of Killamarsh Station to be fascinating, although I did find my eyes watering just a little, when I realised as to how much this scene has changed since my youth. So, I have again taken the opportunity of sharing with you, some images taken by myself in “happier times”, i.e. 1977, when this section of the line remained open, as a freight only route in order to serve collieries at Staveley. For a potted, though relatively detailed description and history of both, the station and the railway, I recommend the Disused Station Website, link below: http:
    3 points
  12. I'm afraid that I disagree with that Dave, as my family and fore bears, like all those around us, shopped in the Rag & Tag, Castle Market, and Norfolk Market Hall, all their lives without dying of food poisoning or anything similar. We didn't battle for expensive parking places as we walked from Heeley to town, did our shopping and walked home again. In the old days there were no suburban supermarkets so we did much of our shopping at our local shops but always went to town on Saturdays and at holiday times besides works lunch times. I, personally always enjoyed shopping in town
    3 points
  13. You really would have to have been born into a certain class of society and in a certain period to really appreciate the benefits of the rag n tag, Norfolk Market Hall and Dixon Lane. It wasn't about prices (which were as low as they could get), nor was it about quality (which was as varied as you chose), it was about COMMUNITY. A community that travelled together on trams and buses, not cars, that walked long distances without thinking it extraordinary, that faced hardships such as coal rationing, very long snowbound winters and basic foodstuffs and which above all related to one another. Th
    3 points
  14. I can understand that, I once fell from off a thirty foot ladder, luckily I was on the bottom rung.
    3 points
  15. Hi Athy, I've not heard 'Like Knitting Sand' or 'Plaiting Fog...' before. When I worked for Derbyhire CC in the early 90's one of my colleagues used to say 'It's Like Knitting Fog!' She was usually referring to the complete nonsense which senior people came out with in meetings. Another expression which came out of those meetings was 'Purposeful Dithering'. I little later on another 'bright spark' came up with 'Bullshit Bingo'. Everytime somebody came out with a nonsense expression in a meeting he would tick a card and then when he had a straight line shout 'House'. Unfortunately none of
    3 points
  16. I was looking through some photos I had saved, and what a surprise, the London Road shop 🙂
    3 points
  17. Len, the pub you mention (Bagshawe Arms) is still there, and the site is relatively untouched/neglected, but its a great site for wildlife. Although the buildings are gone, you can still make out the original layout of the site today. A small section of the original road is still there, from before they made the dual carriageway, that section survives as a curved lay-by where I've marked the arrow. I believe this is where the original main entrance was?...
    3 points
  18. It was chucking it down!!. Mum and dad took me to see the parade and we stood on the Moor in front of British Home Stores, which as the doors were set back offered a bit of shelter. I remember the lights on the illuminated trams going past and being soaked. Apparently I told dad I wanted to be a tram driver, he told me not to be so daft, but then again I was only three years old. Fast forward thirty odd years and I joined the tramway museum at Crich, and eventually got to be a tram driver, and got to drive the Last Tram I had seen that night.
    3 points
  19. This conversation sounds like an audition for the Teletubbies.
    3 points
  20. A few bits from 1926 newspapers for those interested:
    3 points
  21. Hia all, just to add another name to the mix. I have spoken to my friend who grew up in Crookes, where her Gran had a shop till the '50s. She remembers the name ' DROICH' and this spelling, but has no idea where it was.
    3 points
  22. Hi all. I have written a biographical piece on my great-great grandfather, PC Thomas Clifford of Derbyshire Constabulary, who was posted to the area of Sheffield's border with Derbyshire in the early 1880s. This has now been published online, as a freely downloadable pdf document, by Derbyshire Family History Society (DFHS). The piece is 82 pages with as many period images, and takes about two hours to read. Many members of the community which PC Clifford patrolled were culters, and others wandered down from the city to drink in the pubs over the border. I therefore devote a signific
    3 points
  23. Coupe Brothers, Carting contractors, builders merchants & brick manufacturers 19 Carlisle Street East (1919-1925)
    3 points
  24. Following Jean Cass's excellent history of the Rivelin Tunnel, published here in August 2010, hildweller posted a comment and a photo of the tunnel exit. His last two sentences referred to the tunnel’s entrance, somewhere in the wood behind the Ladybower Fisheries Office.He wrote “Has anyone ever seen this portal I wonder. I’m afraid exploring up there is beyond me nowadays.” Please see the attached photo, taken from the woods behind the Fisheries. I was surprised to find that the Rivelin junction is open to the elements, outside the Valve House. The flow from right to left is the gravity
    3 points
  25. 3 points
  26. Came across this little gem today. Little Matlock, Loxley.
    3 points
  27. As promised here is the video of my recent visit
    2 points
  28. People tracking me on the two leading Sheffield Forums will know I was a bobby in B Div before I became a journalist and broadcaster. Three years of patrolling Burngreave, St Philips, Hanover, Broomhall, and Sharrow was enough to confirm what I had learned as a kid at Sharrow from 1942 onwards.....that these communities had a solid gold centre that could not be replicated in Gleadless Valley, Mosbrough or anywhere else. On the night of the hurricane in 63 I was on night duty in the Ellesmere Road area and stayed on duty until 3 o clock the following afternoon where people were trying to salvag
    2 points
  29. Actually for me it's both basic respect and not wanting to further erode the valuable engravings, pieces of our history that've miraculously managed to survive so long, even in this city-! If they have to be shifted, put them to the side and at a slight incline, but this is Sheffield; let's walk on them for H+S, forget how slippy 'stones get when it's raining.. I've always hated gravestones being used as pavement, reeks of the 'Knows the price of everything but value of nothing' mentality that corrodes beauty. Some in the Gen. Cemetery have been smashed up and used as drain edging next to pa
    2 points
  30. Too many really Just part of the journey in the decline of the Sheffield we’d all known and loved
    2 points
  31. UK Grid Reference Finder https://gridreferencefinder.com/ "High Bradfield SK273 937" https://gridreferencefinder.com?gr=SK2730093700|SK273_s_937|1&t=SK273 937&v=r
    2 points
  32. OK not strictly buses/trams, here are a couple of photos from a large transport archive showing inspection of a taxi at East Bank Garage following a collision in 1965. They are Sheffield Transport originals so a record of the incident. Also text from rear. Hope they may be of interest.
    2 points
  33. Amazing place just an hour or so outside of Sheffield!!
    2 points
  34. She's probably got four kids and an arse like a hippopotamus now....move on.
    2 points
  35. I've just discovered what the "rp" on Ordnance Survey maps means - revision point. In the 1940s the Survey took photos of selected points to make cross referral of new mappings easier. Some of the photos have been re-discovered and put on-line. The only ones for Sheffield are those taken in Attercliffe. For example: Revision Points discussion Attercliffe Revision Points
    2 points
  36. Research in my tram books tells me the Handsworth tramway extension was opened in 1909 as far as Finchwell Road, and the Darnall spur was opened at the same time, in the early days used by alternate cars, but I suspect not for long.
    2 points
  37. Is it Twitch Hill Hall? There's a Twitch Hill in Horbury, but I don't know of any reference to Crookes.
    2 points
  38. These are the two images of Joseph at the front of his autobiography....quite in keeping with his story, I think.
    2 points
  39. This information came from a resident. The TOWER was built into a 10ft wall at the bottom of Ringinglow Road, and edged the Kitchen Gardens of Banner Cross Hall. The Tower was built for Lord John Murrey, as a quiet place to relax. It had two rooms with Bow Windows, and is also said to have had a small Library.
    2 points
  40. When we have finished "censuring" the actions of our ancestors ( well, a very few of them, actually) over something that happened many years ago ...in a totally different time... a time with different moral values and mores , perhaps we might remind ourselves that slavery was abolished in the British Empire in 1833 and that an anti-slavery movement had been established in this country as far back as 1772. Indeed, the Governor General of Upper Canada ( Simcoe) abolished slavery there in 1783....fifty years before the "Mother" country...and as a nation we were amongst the first so to do!
    2 points
  41. I went for a picture stroll around the quays five years ago.
    2 points
  42. But then the building with WH Smith’s on the ground floor and the one next door that is Santander still survive!?! Struggling to find an image without the scaffolding up? Similar perspective so you can see the new and old? 😁
    2 points
  43. I noticed the rather nice plaque marking William Marsden's birthplace earlier today. I hadn't noticed it before although press reports say it was unveiled last summer replacing the earlier plaque mentioned in the original post. I didn't realise Marsden was born in Sheffield. https://www.rmcmedia.co.uk/vibe/movers-and-makers/article/City-honours-Sheffield-man-who-founded-UKs-first-free-and-cancer-hospitals
    2 points
  44. The proprietor was George Reuben Barron, b 1854, Scotton Lincolnshire. In the late 1870's his business premises were at 27 Penistone Road. In the 1881 census he was single, boarding at 57 Cross Bedford Street. By 1891 he was living at 7 Jobson Rd, with his nephew Reuben Welch, a harness maker. The earliest I can find him trading as Roscoe's in the newspaper's is a reference to them exhibiting in the Ecclesfield Agricultural Show in 1889. In August of the same year they relocated to Infirmary Road from their previous premises on Penistone Road. He married in 1898, and in 1901 ha
    2 points
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