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dunsbyowl1867

Emma Harrison

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Sheffield Business woman and current owner of Thornbridge Hall recalls growing up in Sheffield and attending Tapton School.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00tfv5f/The_House_I_Grew_up_In_Series_4_Emma_Harrison/

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I wonder if you were prompted to look into this by having been to the Thornbridge Hall "Open Day" last weekend.

We went on Sunday. A very nice afternoon out. We bought some runner beans, french beans and some chillies from the little produce stall.

Beans are consumed already. I've just arrived home with some mince to do with the chillies for tea.

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I wonder if you were prompted to look into this by having been to the Thornbridge Hall "Open Day" last weekend.

We went on Sunday. A very nice afternoon out. We bought some runner beans, french beans and some chillies from the little produce stall.

Beans are consumed already. I've just arrived home with some mince to do with the chillies for tea.

No Vox but would have loved to have gone, Fond memories of school visits back in the 1970s!

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I wonder if you were prompted to look into this by having been to the Thornbridge Hall "Open Day" last weekend.

We went on Sunday. A very nice afternoon out. We bought some runner beans, french beans and some chillies from the little produce stall.

Beans are consumed already. I've just arrived home with some mince to do with the chillies for tea.

Is there any connection between Thornbridge Hall and the Thornbridge district of Sheffield? Who better to ask than a former pupil of Thornbridge Grammar and a purchaser of french beans from the produce stall at Thornbridge Hall.

PS Why did Snook say he never called it a 'Grammar' school when, according to the Concise Oxford Dictionary a Grammar School was one typically founded in the 16th century for teaching Latin?

(Mr Snook, our venerable Headmaster wrote and published the official Latin Textbook used for generations at Thornbridge School)

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Is there any connection between Thornbridge Hall and the Thornbridge district of Sheffield? Who better to ask than a former pupil of Thornbridge Grammar and a purchaser of french beans from the produce stall at Thornbridge Hall.

PS Why did Snook say he never called it a 'Grammar' school when, according to the Concise Oxford Dictionary a Grammar School was one typically founded in the 16th century for teaching Latin?

(Mr Snook, our venerable Headmaster wrote and published the official Latin Textbook used for generations at Thornbridge School)

Now that's a very good question!

Followed by another very good question.

As an aside,

I bumped into Mr Snook at Fullwood (maybe 10-15 years ago) We stopped and chatted for ages. What a lovely old man he turned out to be. He remembered my name and volunteered it without prompting. We both lamented the passing of "nicer" times. He said that in all the years that he was head at Thornbridge, there was never any major incident to which the police had to be called.

Not so nowadays.

Edit:

What years were you there ?

Edited by vox
Afterthought

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Now that's a very good question!

Followed by another very good question.

As an aside,

I bumped into Mr Snook at Fullwood (maybe 10-15 years ago) We stopped and chatted for ages. What a lovely old man he turned out to be. He remembered my name and volunteered it without prompting. We both lamented the passing of "nicer" times. He said that in all the years that he was head at Thornbridge, there was never any major incident to which the police had to be called.

Not so nowadays.

Edit:

What years were you there ?

I started in 1961, my first report was in July 1962, my last in July 1966. Most of the teachers were the same throughout the 5 years, Miss Lane / English, Mr Lancaster / Maths & Science, Miss Cox / History & Geogaphy, Mr Rainer / Art, Mr Evans / PE, Miss Hannington / French, Mr Snook / RI.

Sounds like a delightful conversation you had with Mr Snook, I look back and think how fortunate I was to have been to a school like Thornbridge and to be taught by teachers of that caliber.

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I started in 1961, my first report was in July 1962, my last in July 1966. Most of the teachers were the same throughout the 5 years, Miss Lane / English, Mr Lancaster / Maths & Science, Miss Cox / History & Geogaphy, Mr Rainer / Art, Mr Evans / PE, Miss Hannington / French, Mr Snook / RI.

Sounds like a delightful conversation you had with Mr Snook, I look back and think how fortunate I was to have been to a school like Thornbridge and to be taught by teachers of that caliber.

I think I started in '61 so they were all there during my time as well.

I had various teachers over the years. A few more that I remember being there:

"Doc" Haslam / Physics & Chemistry,

Miss Boublier (she married Doc H)

Mr Smith (Gorky) / French

Mr Jones / Music,

Mr Pearson / Woodwork, Metalwork & Tech drawing

Mr Beckett / Woodwork

Mr Macmahon, Deputy Head

Mr Almond (Nutty) / Maths and Science subjects

And not forgetting the stunningly beautiful Miss Hollingsworth.

Edit:

That would probably put you in the same year as Brian Barker then ?

Edited by vox
afterthought

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I think I started in '61 so they were all there during my time as well.

I had various teachers over the years. A few more that I remember being there:

"Doc" Haslam / Physics & Chemistry,

Miss Boublier (she married Doc H)

Mr Smith (Gorky) / French

Mr Jones / Music,

Mr Pearson / Woodwork, Metalwork & Tech drawing

Mr Beckett / Woodwork

Mr Macmahon, Deputy Head

Mr Almond (Nutty) / Maths and Science subjects

And not forgetting the stunningly beautiful Miss Hollingsworth.

Edit:

That would probably put you in the same year as Brian Barker then ?

Hey Vox, We have had this conversation before Here

I have re-read that entire post, it is amazing, just blows me away. All the memories, all the photos, the piano saga - a classic. Your teacher list did jog the memory, Doc Haslam was a legend, there was a rumour that he could make any pupil whimper just by his mere presence, his scowl and his booming voice - and I saw it happen!

I don't suppose you have a photograph of the stunningly beautiful Miss Hollingsworth do you?

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I don't suppose you have a photograph of the stunningly beautiful Miss Hollingsworth do you?

No, not a picture of the stunningly beautiful Miss Hollingsworth.

But I do have a picture of Emma Harrison

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Hey Vox, We have had this conversation before Here

I have re-read that entire post, it is amazing, just blows me away. All the memories, all the photos, the piano saga - a classic. Your teacher list did jog the memory, Doc Haslam was a legend, there was a rumour that he could make any pupil whimper just by his mere presence, his scowl and his booming voice - and I saw it happen! A fabulous teacher. You knew exactly where you stood with him. Witty, clever, good fun when it was appropriate, but cross the line - - Well - you just didn't did you ?

Remember his skill in, after an initial yell at some miscreant down the length of the room, lowering his voice to a barely audible level that had the whole place in silence, and the recipient straining his ears to make sure he got the instructions right.

I think I remember rightly that his "self-introduction" to us included the claim "I can make a first year cry at fifty paces"

And for all that an extremely popular bloke.

I don't suppose you have a photograph of the stunningly beautiful Miss Hollingsworth do you? You wish ---

I saw Miss Hollingsworth on Abbeydale Road in the mid 70's. She was in a bus queue on the opposite side of the road.. By the time I'd plucked up courage to approach her she'd hopped onto a bus and out of my life for ever - Oh well

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Is there any connection between Thornbridge Hall and the Thornbridge district of Sheffield?

This is from the introduction to Peter Harvey's excellent book about street names. {Bits in square brackets are my comments].

One curiosity occurs in the street names of Frecheville, which was part of the Mosborough boundary extension. [in 1967]

In the years before Sheffield took it over, many of the Frecheville streets were named after places in Derbyshire. This was mainly because the streets were built by Charles Boot (who thought up the name Frecheville) [Not the name, which was an old North Derbyshire family, but applying it to the place] and many of them were named after places near his home, Thornbridge Hall. However, even in those days Sheffield had its eyes on Frecheville for a possible takeover, and giving the streets Peak District names did tend to emphasise they were in Derbyshire.

So presumably the school and district were named in the same way, either directly or indirectly because of local street names.

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No, not a picture of the stunningly beautiful Miss Hollingsworth.

But I do have a picture of Emma Harrison

So thats what a £35 million smile looks like!

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This is from the introduction to Peter Harvey's excellent book about street names. {Bits in square brackets are my comments].

One curiosity occurs in the street names of Frecheville, which was part of the Mosborough boundary extension. [in 1967]

In the years before Sheffield took it over, many of the Frecheville streets were named after places in Derbyshire. This was mainly because the streets were built by Charles Boot (who thought up the name Frecheville) [Not the name, which was an old North Derbyshire family, but applying it to the place] and many of them were named after places near his home, Thornbridge Hall. However, even in those days Sheffield had its eyes on Frecheville for a possible takeover, and giving the streets Peak District names did tend to emphasise they were in Derbyshire.

So presumably the school and district were named in the same way, either directly or indirectly because of local street names.

Well sorted Bayleaf.

The school was built around 1960. Well after the surrounding "Thornbridge" streets were built .

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Well sorted Bayleaf.

The school was built around 1960. Well after the surrounding "Thornbridge" streets were built .

I can well remember the great 1967 'land grab'! I was the first person from Sheffield in charge of the library at Frecheville, and the locals were hostile to the change to put it mildly. There was a newsletter published by the very active community association which was full of complaints for quite a while, mainly centred around the increase in the Rates (now Council Tax) which resulted in the move.

I remember one was the fact that under Sheffield, the street lights were kept on all night, whereas under Derbyshire they went out after midnight, so no wonder the rates had gone up. The reply was that while this was true, the burglary rate in the area had dropped by over 60% as a result!

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