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christinap90

Cambridge street, Henry leah's and sons stamping works

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Hey everyone..

Does enyone know when Henry leah's and sons stamping works building, in Cambrdge street was built?

I would also appreciate some more info about the place..

Is in vacant right now?

What it used to be before?

How old is the building? etc..

thnks :)

PS: i've also attached some pic of the building

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The building is Grade II* listed. There's some information about it on English Heritage's "Images of England" site here:

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/details/....aspx?id=456128

More information and a photo of the courtyard are in the Pevsner guide, which you might be able to read here:

http://books.google.com/books?id=JS5RbeB6d...eah%27s+yard%22

Jeremy

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And behind the closed gates/doors English Heritage.

Welcome to Sheffield History christinap90,

and thanks for the photographs.

Edited by madannie77
repaired broken link

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The building is Grade II* listed. There's some information about it on English Heritage's "Images of England" site here:

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/details/....aspx?id=456128

More information and a photo of the courtyard are in the Pevsner guide, which you might be able to read here:

http://books.google.com/books?id=JS5RbeB6d...eah%27s+yard%22

Jeremy

Sorry to hijack

Jeremy, when you say 'should be able to read' do you mean actually read the book online?

If so, how?

Cheers

Dan

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Sorry to hijack

Jeremy, when you say 'should be able to read' do you mean actually read the book online?

If so, how?

Cheers

Dan

Dan, I said might because I have discovered in the past that google books shows different content in different countries. When I click the link that I provided I am taken to a preview of the book where I can read the pages on Leah's Yard, but I am based in the US so I wasn't sure if UK based readers would be able to access it.

Jeremy

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That'll be why then

Was wondering why i couldnt seem to read the book online.

Cheers for that matey.

Dan

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Hey everyone..

Does enyone know when Henry leah's and sons stamping works building, in Cambrdge street was built?

I would also appreciate some more info about the place..

Is in vacant right now?

What it used to be before?

How old is the building? etc..

thnks :)

PS: i've also attached some pic of the building

I have taken several pictures of the buildings on Cambridge Street recently as the area is due for demolition and redevelopment.

Other nearby buildings have foundation stones dated around the 1859's - 60's so I would assume this building to be of a similar age.

I have posted this recent (November 22 2008) picture of the building in another thread but it is more relevant here.

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These are the main things the Pevsner guide says about the building:

In the 1880s it was known as Cambridge Street Horn Works. Henry Leah, after whom it is now named, was in business there from 1892 making die stamps for silverware. By 1905 the inner courtyard was shared by 18 little mesters.

According to the Sevenstone website the building will not be demolished when the area is redeveloped, but will be "stylishly restored and put back to commercial operation".

Jeremy

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These are the main things the Pevsner guide says about the building:

In the 1880s it was known as Cambridge Street Horn Works. Henry Leah, after whom it is now named, was in business there from 1892 making die stamps for silverware. By 1905 the inner courtyard was shared by 18 little mesters.

According to the Sevenstone website the building will not be demolished when the area is redeveloped, but will be "stylishly restored and put back to commercial operation".

Jeremy

It depends what they mean by "stylishly restored" I suppose but its nice to know that the building is not to be demolished but "put back to commercial operation". I hope this goes for other historic buildings on this street as well.

Are any of these buildings listed?

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It depends what they mean by "stylishly restored" I suppose but its nice to know that the building is not to be demolished but "put back to commercial operation". I hope this goes for other historic buildings on this street as well.

Are any of these buildings listed?

From the developer's web site it looks to me that everything south of Leah's Yard is going. Number 32 is grade II listed, it's a long time since I've been on Cambridge Street so I don't remember whether it is above or below Leah's Yard...

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/details/....aspx?id=456129

Jeremy

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Information as much use as a chocolate fireguard, but here goes :

Sportsman 20 Coal Pit Lane (1833)

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Hey everyone..

Does enyone know when Henry leah's and sons stamping works building, in Cambrdge street was built?

I would also appreciate some more info about the place..

Is in vacant right now?

What it used to be before?

How old is the building? etc..

thnks :)

PS: i've also attached some pic of the building

Didn't Gilders VW showrooms used to be somewhere around there. That is, before they moved to Banner Cross.

I also remember having to go to a (chrome) plating shop in the 1940's that was around there somewhere or perhaps a little lower down the street.

Regards

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Information as much use as a chocolate fireguard, but here goes :

Sportsman 20 Coal Pit Lane (1833)

The Sportsman was next door to Leah's Yard in 1850 and there were several other pubs on Coalpit lane, - the Union on the corner with Diivision street, the Yellow Lion, Wellington Tavern, Barley Corn Tavern, Red Lion, and the Chequers Inn.

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