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What's in a name: St Maclou in Sheffield

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In the housing estate between Leppings Lane, Penistone Road and the Sheffield Wednesday football stadium, built largely if not entirely by Dawson & Patchett (Joseph Frederick Dawson, * 1858; William Johnson Patchett, 1875-1931), most dwellings have names (and dates). This seems to me remarkable by itself: I for one at least am not aware of any other comparable estate in Sheffield where naming (and dating) of the dwellings is equally consistent. I would appreciate being told about other instances of the phenomenon.

In Vere Road, where both Dawson and Patchett themselves lived for a time (at numbers 65 and 63 respectively: "Rigsby 1900 Cottages"), they are all geographical names from Lincolnshire (the county where both Dawson and Patchett were born: in Authorpe and in Toynton respectively); elsewhere on the estate, they seem to be British geographical names also. With three notable exceptions:

Hiawatha 1903 Villas (186/188 Penistone Road )

Minnehaha 1903 Villas (182/184 Penistone Road )

St Maclou 1903 House (192/194 Penistone Road, on the corner of Bickerton Road))

Hiawatha is the eponymous hero of THE SONG OF HIAWATHA by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882); Minnehaha is his beloved / betrothed / wife; presumably, the names were given by an admirer of the epic: who knows but Dawson and/or Patchett themselves?

I do not, however, seem to be able to get any plausible handle on "St Maclou". This is the more regrettable because – apart from Authorpe 1899 House (208 Penistone Road; and this is 'obvious', because Authorpe is Dawson's birthplace) - St Maclou is the only "House" in the estate (the others are "Cottages" or "Villas"). St Maclou seems to be a locality in Normandy (France), close to if not by now part of Rouen; and, presumably, Maclou was a 'proper' saint, too. But does anyone know why, in Sheffield or at all, someone would wish to name his dwelling after St Maclou, either the locality, or the saint, or in whatever guise?

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Nicely put question, got me completely floored !

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Some more to add to the list, some more from Hillsborough ...

Steel Bank Villas, Common Side (from Steel Bank, duh !)

Victoria Villas, Upperthorpe (my relative lived here; near Ebenezer Elliott's old house)

Graham Villas, Fulwood Road, Ranmoor (near Graham Road ???)

Vicarage Villas, Vicarage Road

Scarsdale Villas, Norton Woodseats

Albert Villas, Worrall Road, Wadsley

Clifton Villas, Handsworth

Fern Villas, Wood Lane, Stannington

Onchan Villas, Causeway Road, Dore

Melbourne Villas, Handsworth

Somerfield Villas, 27 Rossington Road, Endcliffe (Sister's in-laws lived "up the hill")

Wharncliffe Villas, Laird Road, Wadsley

Hartington Villas, 30 Beechwood Road, Hillsborough

Hillsborough Villas, 72-82 Langsett Road, Hillsborough

Lake View Villas, Broughton Road, Owlerton

Norbury Villas, 67 Kendal Road, Hillsborough

Oakdale Villas, Abberdale Road

Oakland Villas, 105 Oakland Road, Hillsborough

Primrose Villas, 55 Kendal Road, Hillsborough

Richmond Villas, 42 Dykes Hall Road (interested in this one, I used to live at 53)

Wharncliffe Villas, Park Road, Wadsley

seems to back up your point, a rather dull selection of names, except Onchan and Norbury ... doesn't answer any of your question, but, hopefully of some interest.

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In the housing estate between Leppings Lane, Penistone Road and the Sheffield Wednesday football stadium, built largely if not entirely by Dawson & Patchett (Joseph Frederick Dawson, * 1858; William Johnson Patchett, 1875-1931), most dwellings have names (and dates). This seems to me remarkable by itself: I for one at least am not aware of any other comparable estate in Sheffield where naming (and dating) of the dwellings is equally consistent. I would appreciate being told about other instances of the phenomenon.

In Vere Road, where both Dawson and Patchett themselves lived for a time (at numbers 65 and 63 respectively: "Rigsby 1900 Cottages"), they are all geographical names from Lincolnshire (the county where both Dawson and Patchett were born: in Authorpe and in Toynton respectively); elsewhere on the estate, they seem to be British geographical names also. With three notable exceptions:

Hiawatha 1903 Villas (186/188 Penistone Road )

Minnehaha 1903 Villas (182/184 Penistone Road )

St Maclou 1903 House (192/194 Penistone Road, on the corner of Bickerton Road))

Hiawatha is the eponymous hero of THE SONG OF HIAWATHA by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882); Minnehaha is his beloved / betrothed / wife; presumably, the names were given by an admirer of the epic: who knows but Dawson and/or Patchett themselves?

I do not, however, seem to be able to get any plausible handle on "St Maclou". This is the more regrettable because – apart from Authorpe 1899 House (208 Penistone Road; and this is 'obvious', because Authorpe is Dawson's birthplace) - St Maclou is the only "House" in the estate (the others are "Cottages" or "Villas"). St Maclou seems to be a locality in Normandy (France), close to if not by now part of Rouen; and, presumably, Maclou was a 'proper' saint, too. But does anyone know why, in Sheffield or at all, someone would wish to name his dwelling after St Maclou, either the locality, or the saint, or in whatever guise?

Maybe he was a gambling man and backed this winner.....the dates are about right!

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html...9659C946397D6CF

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Maybe he was a gambling man and backed this winner.....the dates are about right!

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html...9659C946397D6CF

Nice odds, I'll take thruppence on Mrs Miggins in the 4:30 !

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In the housing estate between Leppings Lane, Penistone Road and the Sheffield Wednesday football stadium, built largely if not entirely by Dawson & Patchett (Joseph Frederick Dawson, * 1858; William Johnson Patchett, 1875-1931), most dwellings have names (and dates). This seems to me remarkable by itself: I for one at least am not aware of any other comparable estate in Sheffield where naming (and dating) of the dwellings is equally consistent. I would appreciate being told about other instances of the phenomenon.

In Vere Road, where both Dawson and Patchett themselves lived for a time (at numbers 65 and 63 respectively: "Rigsby 1900 Cottages"), they are all geographical names from Lincolnshire (the county where both Dawson and Patchett were born: in Authorpe and in Toynton respectively); elsewhere on the estate, they seem to be British geographical names also. With three notable exceptions:

Hiawatha 1903 Villas (186/188 Penistone Road )

Minnehaha 1903 Villas (182/184 Penistone Road )

St Maclou 1903 House (192/194 Penistone Road, on the corner of Bickerton Road))

Hiawatha is the eponymous hero of THE SONG OF HIAWATHA by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882); Minnehaha is his beloved / betrothed / wife; presumably, the names were given by an admirer of the epic: who knows but Dawson and/or Patchett themselves?

I do not, however, seem to be able to get any plausible handle on "St Maclou". This is the more regrettable because – apart from Authorpe 1899 House (208 Penistone Road; and this is 'obvious', because Authorpe is Dawson's birthplace) - St Maclou is the only "House" in the estate (the others are "Cottages" or "Villas"). St Maclou seems to be a locality in Normandy (France), close to if not by now part of Rouen; and, presumably, Maclou was a 'proper' saint, too. But does anyone know why, in Sheffield or at all, someone would wish to name his dwelling after St Maclou, either the locality, or the saint, or in whatever guise?

Could be a long shot or words to that effect the reference to St Maclou at Rouen .

Rouen was the town where Joan of Arc was executed in 1431,

Nice church.

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Maybe he was a gambling man and backed this winner.....the dates are about right!

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html...9659C946397D6CF

This does very much seem "about right", and then some: viz., St Maclou was a horse winning a 1902 race in LINCOLNSHIRE, the county that almost all the other edifices in the area were named for villages in.

Indeed, I am now wondering, would Hiawatha and Minnehaha have been names of contemporary race horses as well? (apart from, indeed named after, obviously the main protagonists in Longfellow's SONG OF HIAWATHA). Google does not seem to tell me; does anyone know?

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Hi all

new to the forum today and can solve the naming of St Maclou for you all.

My great,great grandfather was caled Edwin Charles Tagg and he was a turf correspondent and from what I have picked up he was a famous character in Sheffield racing circles. He had a pitch at Doncaster racecourse where he was know as "Taggy under the trees" and "Taggy the tipster" and he had an almost uncanny knack of tipping winners.

My late grandmother told me that St Maclou house was indeed named after the horse of the same name which won Edwin a considerable sum of money which enabled him to have the house built.

It is rumoured but I have no evidence to say whether its true or not that the house was later lost as part of a bet.

Edwin also owned a racehorse called Sheffield Wednesday and the Sheffield character Long Sammy used to be his bookies runner and when Edwin died Lond Sammy came to pay his respects to his family.

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And yes folks "What's In A Name" comes from my face chap - Shakespeare. He's refering to Elizabeth Tudor (Elizabeth 1st), who's a rose (the tudor rose) by any other name. ;-):)

I thought I would add that because lots of people can't stand Shakespeare, but still quote him without knowing. :P

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Hi all

new to the forum today and can solve the naming of St Maclou for you all.

My great,great grandfather was caled Edwin Charles Tagg and he was a turf correspondent and from what I have picked up he was a famous character in Sheffield racing circles. He had a pitch at Doncaster racecourse where he was know as "Taggy under the trees" and "Taggy the tipster" and he had an almost uncanny knack of tipping winners.

My late grandmother told me that St Maclou house was indeed named after the horse of the same name which won Edwin a considerable sum of money which enabled him to have the house built.

It is rumoured but I have no evidence to say whether its true or not that the house was later lost as part of a bet.

Edwin also owned a racehorse called Sheffield Wednesday and the Sheffield character Long Sammy used to be his bookies runner and when Edwin died Lond Sammy came to pay his respects to his family.

Must have been difficult running dressed like this! ;-)

http://www.picturesh...Glvbj1zZWFyY2g=

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This does very much seem "about right", and then some: viz., St Maclou was a horse winning a 1902 race in LINCOLNSHIRE, the county that almost all the other edifices in the area were named for villages in.

Indeed, I am now wondering, would Hiawatha and Minnehaha have been names of contemporary race horses as well? (apart from, indeed named after, obviously the main protagonists in Longfellow's SONG OF HIAWATHA). Google does not seem to tell me; does anyone know?

There was indeed a famous horse around at the turn of that Century

From the Glasgow Herald April 1900

The championship cup for Clydesdale stallions presented by the Duke of Portland was carries off by Mr John Pollocks famous horse "Hiawatha".

And report from 1899

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Reading this thread was amazing I'm a Tagg, and my grandfather told me the same story word for word about his grandfather who won money on a horse race and built a house near Sheffield Wednesday, although I was given the impression the house was no longer standing, but it sounds like it is. Next time I'm in Sheffield I will pass by. I also know that my great grandfather pretty much gambled and lost everything he inherited so maybe that was when the house was sold.

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Hi i used to live on Shenstone rd. 1nthe 1940s .There used to be a shop on Leppings Lane near to the football ground belonging to a Mr. Tagg he had a son called Hawksley Tagg .I seem to remember it as newsagent but cannot be sure.Hawksley and i were friends in the late 40s early 50s are you of the same family?

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