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RLongden
3 hours ago, tozzin said:

This is Prince of Wales Road snaking through farmland.

 

prince of wales rd.jpg

It would be good to get some reference points on this, as given it is an aerial photo, it must post-date both the invention of aircraft and photography? 
Attached are a series of maps of the locale of Prince of Wales Road. These are dated 1893, 1906, 1923 and 1935 respectively. You can see the route of PoW Road on the NLS Map with merged views of old and new. Stand House is the reference point for each map, apart from the last, when it has disappeared under the housing estate, built between the period of this and the one in 1923.

I can’t see any road on the maps, as it looks like PoW Road was built from Darnall upwards, to Manor Top (or the turnpike road at that time?). I had thought that the position of the left bend may be where St Theresa’s is now, with the photo looking up to Manor Top, as that is the only stretch of road that follows those series of bends?

I’m not sure where it is, so are there any clues or reference points on the aerial photo please?

69D8A157-BACB-4B90-BDBF-FAC874385CD1.jpeg

80394E6F-AD44-4C7C-8C40-78685A273024.jpeg

44A46F87-F76B-4F1F-92AF-709DF7E0E168.jpeg

4C660C76-62FC-4E7E-83E0-62D182FEA344.jpeg

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Old rider
On 13/06/2020 at 09:40, lysandernovo said:

We had a few colourful Wartburgs around here but very few Trabants...the( nearly all) cardboard people's car!

Lady my wife worked with husband had a Wartberg estate he used for his painting bussiness. He tried to get us to buy one telling us what a wonderful car it was. The last time I saw Wartburg cars was whilst commissioning some machinery in Egypt. At that time a lot of the taxis in Cairo were Wartburgs!

 

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History dude

Actually Stand House Farm survived the construction of the Manor Estate and was still there in 1927 as these photo's show. The Cowlishaw family owned it at the time. They built a new house just outside the Manor Lodge (the red brick one that stands alone) with the compensation from the Council for the demolition to make way for the school. Incidentally the new house was called Stand House.

Prince of Wales Road was built to ease the unemployment in Sheffield in 1921. Work started in October 1921 and by March 1922 £66,708 had been spent on it. Ridgeway Road was also started in 1923. It was February 1928 before any trams started running on Prince.

Stand House School wasn't opened till 1 October 1931.  

Stand House Farm 1 1927.jpg

Stand House Farm 1927.jpg

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History dude

Other aerial shots from 1927 also shows that only one lane has been built. No Tram posts or tracks yet either!

EPW018971 Manor 1927.jpg

EPW018973 Manor 1927.jpg

Manor Estate, Sheffield, 1927 Manor top.jpg

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tozzin

The red brick detached house you mention that was built by the Cowlishaws opposite the Manor Lodge, castle as we knew it, I remember that very well from childhood, in the late forties and fifties to I don’t know when, Jimmy Childs was well known in Sheffield for his demolition business, he also had a yard just further on Manor Lane on the left towards City Road. Seeing it now on google earth, ( don’t actually know the year) but it looks shocking with its overgrown trees and hedges, in the back garden was a fantastic greenhouse which was always well kept.

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Lemmy117

In July 1928 the Illuminating Engineering Society held its annual conference in Sheffield, and among the 8 miles of road lighting installations visited by the delegates, Prince of Wales Road boasted at least four different types of electric lighting, including 300 watt, 500 watt 1000 watt and 1500 watt lanterns, each installed to highlight their particular light control. Prince was chosen as part of the tour as it was a new road with very little surrounding lighting which would interfere with the installations. The energy bill must have been fantastic with a road full of 1500w lamps! When I left the lighting industry, it was just going from high pressure sodium to LED and the highest wattage HPS lamp we used was 250w.

The lighting engineer in 1928 was Mr. J. F. Colquhoun, who I think was from Glasgow, and from stories told around at work by people who knew of him, a pretty fearsome character!

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lysandernovo

I remember, as a small lad, having the illuminated Prince of Wales Road with its distinctive " S " shape being pointed out to me by my Dad of an evening stroll in Concord Park.

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Hopman

A local paper from just before Christmas 1920 mentions the plans for the new road (Prince of Wales Road). (This was the same time that the Abbeydale Picture House opened)

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lysandernovo

 I remember Trams ran down a central reservation and to access or exit a stop a main highway had to be crossed. OK in the early days but an impossibility nowadays ( except when Lockdown first began😑)

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Lemmy117

As with most of the old tramway tracks, they were covered over, although I think they might have recovered the rail. The sub base of the tracks was concrete, and it was good quality stuff, it's still there! Some years ago we had to install something in the central reserve and it needed  an electricity supply from one side of the road. We got a trench across the road okay, but could not get through the central reserve, the concrete was bomb proof! Pneumatic drills and JCB's made no difference, we even got a diamond drill company in but it beat them. In the end we gave up and fitted a very early solar powered unit, which wasn't a success.

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Lemmy117
9 minutes ago, lysandernovo said:

 I remember Trams ran down a central reservation and to access or exit a stop a main highway had to be crossed. OK in the early days but an impossibility nowadays ( except when Lockdown first began😑)

Originally the plan for Supertram was to have stops in the middle of the road, and as a trial an island and bus stop was set up at the end of London Road where it joined St. Mary's Gate. It was not a success, I think someone got injured getting to the stop, so after a few months it was scrapped, hence most tramstops are now at the side of the road.

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Hopman

If the tram stops are all at the nearside (on the left), then there is no need for doors on the right (or cabs at each end). I've seen this plan on the continent where at each terminus there's a loop to change direction.

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Lemmy117

UK never went in for turning loops in general, with the exception of Blackpool and possibly a few others. Maybe because most tramways were built on existing streets and land was not available. European cities also tend to have trams pulling trailers, which again was not common in the UK with the coming of electric trams. Of course when a tram spends its life going in the same direction it does causes problems, wheel profiles differing side to side, bearings worn in one direction, brakes worn unevenly etc.

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  • 1 month later...
sovrappeso
On 10/06/2020 at 20:58, Phil Lockwood said:

The White Building was the GPO Maltravers Rd TEC (Telephone Engineering Centre). The “tower” was an office block. The long low building was the stores and below it at street level was the garage where all the vehicles were serviced. Overnight the car park would be packed with vans and trucks. I started my apprenticeship there in 1968 and at the time the building seemed quite new.

The building was completed in 1966 & was definitely in use by May 1966. Post Office Telephones had several departments dotted around the city centre but some were moved to this rather inconvenient location when the building was completed.

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Peter Walker
On 11/06/2020 at 18:26, Stringy72 said:

This is one that Picture Sheffield got wrong. This is looking towards town, but they have described it as facing the other way. I think it's due to that bridge, it was moved from there to the other side of the Markets exit.

w02032.jpg.cc4429e85e683a5d325e2222e5772326.jpg

Seems they've planted a lot of Trees along the way since the 80's as well.

This one below is a bit of a Headscratcher though

w02863.jpg.456d984d437a648a8885d9d02ff9180b.jpg

.

I think the second picture is further down the road from the first photo, I think it is the same bridge in both photos. The slip road to the left is up to Manor Lane and the main carriage way swings to the right down into town.

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  • 2 weeks later...
History dude

There are some new photo's added to Picture Sheffield showing the construction of the road bridge over the Midland railway line.

The first shows the scene before work, the next the bridge supports installed, the third built, with cars - the support clearly visible from the previous photo and the last shows putting in the girders to take the road.   

Nunnery Cutting.jpg

Railway construction work below (right) Bernard Road 1979.jpg

Railway and Parkway 1979.jpg

Construction Bernard Road Bridge over The Parkway John Bedford and Sons 1973.jpg

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