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I was on Canning Street yesterday, first time for around 2 years or more and I was pleasantly surprised to see the old Victorian buildings that still remain have had a spruce up and they look ok. On returning home I tried to find out just what was the name of this short street before it acquired its present name, it only ran from Division Street to Wellington Street so after looking at a 1832 map by J. Tayler Land & Mineral Surveyor, I can find Canning Street but it doesn't seem to have a name, so was it known by a local name before its present one or did it have a recognised name? The street does have a fine set of large stone cobbles, that's if you call them cobbles because they are large, I'm surprised they've survived. I was looking for the home of Mr Oliver Cromwell Turner (seems his father had respect for the man ) who lived here in 1862, he was a Rope & Twine manufacturer , in 1856 he was at 65 Division Street, this address may have been his works or his home, I cant say which. If anyone has any info on Oliver and the original name of Canning Street it would be a great help.

 

 

Blind backhouses on Canning Street built c 1830.jpg

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Was there a particular reason why the stone cobbles were layed at an angle so to say?

I love coming across stone cobbled streets, makes me think about what once was.

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I'm no expert but they may be more stable than the ones laid in rows or it could have been a very artistic stone layer.

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The earliest reference in the papers to Canning Street was January 1834 when Willliam Hutchinson had his table cloth stolen.  In 1835 the Kings Head in Canning Street was a substantial business:

1433753509_CanningStreet1835.png.c9a2e3c2b7c7467a293f5f7d401f6d6a.png

257623286_CanningStreet1890.png.645e1c5a3bd22c92a7b626b68c3d05e1.png

Oliver Cromwell Turner ran the Springfield Ropery on Broomhall Street. In 1841 he was a ropemaker living on Shalesmoor, but by 1851 he and his family had moved to 65 Division Street. He died at Division Street on 12th Augsut 1865.

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The Thomas Holy esq mentioned in Edmunds post must be the gentleman that Holy Street is named after  at the bottom of the Moor.

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Some more images of Canning Street taken by myself on 6th March 2008. My interest is that I found that one of my late grandmothers brothers lived on the street in the early C20th

canningst060308b.JPG

canningst060308c.JPG

canningst060308d.JPG

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Walked along this street many times and admired the buildings. I always thought the cobble angle was to do with drainage moving water to the edge, but I have no evidence or expertise to back that up.

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