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mick851

Ww1 Brodie Helmet

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mick851

I have a WW1 Brodie helmet and inside its stamped

JR & S

A5

Anybody know what the makers stamp mark is?

Thanks

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vox

John Round & Sons Ltd of Sheffield made Brodie helmets, so possibly them, but apparently their mark was just an "R" - Source

However, their mark on their "Sheffield Plate" was "JR&S" Info

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lysander

I only came across the term "Brodie" helmet whilst doing some research for a BBC Radio Sheffield programme. I now see it being mentioned all the time. Does anyone know if the term was actually used during WW1....?

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vox

"The term Brodie is often mis-used and in its correct term refers only to the original 1915 Brodie's Steel Helmet, War Office Pattern,[2] designed by Mr Brodie for the War Office. The Brodie helmet was modified to become the Helmet, Steel, Mk.I, in 1916"

Wikipedia

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mick851

Thanks Vox for your reply, my WW1 helmet is the early raw edge type but just puzzled with the makers mark. Ive seen the R mark before, just never seen the JR & S before, did they use that stamp mark first then changed it to R ?

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lysander

Thanks as well. Never thought to do a quick wiki.

I have heard of them being referred referred to as a "Battle Bowlers". Tinsley Rolling Mills, who were a part of the Sheffield consortium rolling the 20 gauge11/14% Manganese steel ,simply referred to them as "helmets". 1.5 tons of steel sheet was required to produce 1,000 helmets. In 1916 alone Sheffield's steel sheet, hand mills produced sufficient for 1 million helmets, The Ministry of Munitions, in recognition of this and other achievements, made by Sheffield's steelworks awarded 1% of the workforce a medal of the Order of the British Empire. The Head Roller at Tinsley, a George Wainwright, was their recipient. The Works Manager, being salaried was excluded.

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