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Mary & Rebecca Brady's Boarding And Day School


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Stuart0742

Came across this today

Mary & Rebecca Brady's Boarding and Day School, Leavey Greave

What do we know about it

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Came across this today

Mary & Rebecca Brady's Boarding and Day School, Leavey Greave

What do we know about it

1851 Census.

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RichardB

There from at least 1828.

Came across this today

Mary & Rebecca Brady's Boarding and Day School, Leavey Greave

What do we know about it

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RichardB

My. Brady and Rebecca Brady, Academies, Seminaries and Public Schools, Leavy Greave Pigot's 1828-9

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RichardB

Mary & Rebecca Brady. Boarding and Day School, Leavy Greave White's 1833

Brady, Mary & Rebecca, Ladies, Boarding and Day School, Leavygreave White's 1837

Brady, My & Rebecca, Misses, Ladies Scm., Leavygreave Rodgers 1841

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RichardB

Rebecca Brady, Ladies' school, Hanover Buildings White's 1852

Where is Mary ?

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SteveHB

Rebecca Brady, Ladies' school, Hanover Buildings White's 1852

Where is Mary ?

Probably being contrary .... he he

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RichardB

William Lloyd Garrison tells of his visit to see Joseph Barker, which included a tour of his printing office and examining his steam powered press. Joseph Barker aims to "effect a revolution in this country" by providing the people with cheap literature. Garrison considers Joseph Barker a great thinker. Garrison dined with Joseph Lupton of Leeds and in the evening stayed with Mary Brady and Rebecca Brady in Sheffield. Garrison went to various places with friend James Wall and then dined at his home. They had a crowded and animated public meeting at the Quaker meetinghouse in Sheffield. There, Frederick Douglass sold a considerable number of his narrative. The poet James Montgomery was deeply moved. Garrison appealed to James Montgomery to write a poem about American slavery.

Source

and as pdf.

(Probably needs transcribing, then I might be able to read it) ...

Webb.pdf

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RichardB

Letter to My Dear Wife (1846)

Mentions the Bradys.

William Lloyd Garrison reports on the success of the meeting in Sheffield. The poet James Montgomery was "deeply affected" by the public meeting "as the horrors of slavery were revealed." Garrison gratefully remembers Mary Brady and Rebecca Brady's hospitality.

Garrison visited Mrs. Rawson in Wincobank. On his return to London, Garrison did not "feel able, for economy's sake, to ride in what are called the 'first class' cars." The second and third class cars are like "Jim Crow" cars. Garrison describes a "triumphant" meeting in Exeter Hall in London. Garrison's speech was interrupted by rowdies, but applause overpowered opposition. Garrison criticized the sectarian character of the Evangelical Alliance. George Thompson and Frederick Douglass are effective speakers. Garrison is having a happy visit with the Ashursts; the weather in uncommonly fine. In Garrison's absence, Edmund Quincy is making the Liberator a "very racy sheet." Garrison describes the peculiar enmity of Henry Clapp toward Garrison. Henry C. Wright may return with Garrison. Frederick Douglass will stay till May. Garrison outlines his travel plans

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William Lloyd Garrison tells of his visit to ...

(Probably needs transcribing, then I might be able to read it) ...

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Saturday 2 Aug 1851 (Sheff & Roth Independent)

10 Jul 1852 (Sheff & Roth Independent)

Rebecca died 24 Feb 1860, aged 65; 'formerly of Leavygreave' (Sheffield & Rotherham Independent)

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