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Sheffield History

Which of these are "cutlery" in a Historical Sheffield kind of way ?

  

18 members have voted

  1. 1. Which of these are "cutlery" in a Historical Sheffield kind of way ?

    • Knife
      18
    • Fork
      10
    • Spoon
      8
    • Scythe
      9
    • File
      7
    • Scissor
      7
    • Razor
      9


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Which of these are "cutlery" in a Historical Sheffield kind of way ?

You can select more than one answer...

I'll leave it to Richard to explain further !!

;-)

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Having reread the question I voted wrong :(

I now know what Richard is talking about now

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Having reread the question I voted wrong :(

I know what Richard is talking about now

I'm a bit of a bugger, aren't I ? One of the answers, even I'm not sure of !!!! :rolleyes:

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Well if you don't know the answer what are we to do ;-)

It's just the one I'm not sure of ... :huh::angry::blink:

For anyone trying to get this right the word "flatware" might be a useful hint ...

http://www.jaitc.org.uk/default.asp/pages/...combuilder.html

Another popular Poll then ? lol

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It's just the one I'm not sure of ... :huh::angry::blink:

Checked my source, the one I wasn't sure of, was not originally classed as cutlery, but was in later years. So that's all of 'em are cutlery, EXCEPT TWO.

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OK since there are no answers, its the folk and spoon that aren't "cutlery", they are "flatware" since they don't have a cutting edge ....

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I'm not sure that a file would be classed as cutlery in the strictest sense, as it's a hand tool, and so part of a different branch of Sheffield industry, but you could say the same about scythes!!! I once worked with an old scythe maker, and he told me that cutlery was, in his day, classed as a small implement with maintained a cutting edge. He classed cutlery as the following: knives (including daggers and swords), scissors, razors, and small sickles.

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I'm not sure that a file would be classed as cutlery in the strictest sense, as it's a hand tool, and so part of a different branch of Sheffield industry, but you could say the same about scythes!!! I once worked with an old scythe maker, and he told me that cutlery was, in his day, classed as a small implement with maintained a cutting edge. He classed cutlery as the following: knives (including daggers and swords), scissors, razors, and small sickles.

According to my source (which I forget) files were not included initially, but were included later on ...

main point, of course, is that forks and spoons deffo were not cutlery :huh:

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I'm not sure that a file would be classed as cutlery in the strictest sense, as it's a hand tool, and so part of a different branch of Sheffield industry, but you could say the same about scythes!!! I once worked with an old scythe maker, and he told me that cutlery was, in his day, classed as a small implement with maintained a cutting edge. He classed cutlery as the following: knives (including daggers and swords), scissors, razors, and small sickles.

The shearsmiths, cutlers and scissorsmiths founded the Cutlers Company in 1624, the filesmiths had 21 accepted into membership in 1682, I was thinking more like when Tiger Feet by Mud was number one lol

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Which of these are "cutlery" in a Historical Sheffield kind of way ?

You can select more than one answer...

I'll leave it to Richard to explain further !!

;-)

A Poll where you can choose more than one answer ...

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A number of old SheffieldCutlers would also make turnscrews.

Tazz

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Middle English cutellerie, from Old French coutelerie, from coutel, knife; see cutlass.

Dictionary

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Middle English cutellerie, from Old French coutelerie, from coutel, knife; see cutlass.

Dictionary

I was lead to believe that cutlery refered to instruments with a cutting edge,

So Knife, Scythe, Scissors and Razors would qualify as cutler, and also possibly File (does it cut? or does it Abrade? or Grind?)

Forks and Spoons are often classed as Cutlery as they are always packaged with knives in a set of tableware but they do not cut!

Likewise, I was lead to believe that Forks and Spoons were Flatware because they could be stamped out from a flat piece of steel.

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