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  1. RichardB

    1825 Victuallers

    Took some extracting using Excel (=find(), =(mid), sorting, writing out to .txt files, importing from .txt and lots of Copy, Paste Special, Value), I've been using spreadsheets since 1984 (before DOS, it was Visicalc on a Tandy TRS-80, VisiCalc), anyway I'll let Tsavo explain the details !!! ; this stuff is the Victuallers only. 1822 to follow, when I have the time. ? (Hikes Edward, Victualler, Ball And Whitesmith, 8, Spring Allan John,Victualler, Butcher's Arms, 27,Townhead St. Allen Joseph,Victualler, Orange Branch, 58, Hollis Croft Allison Edward, Victualler, Barrel, Little Sheffield Allison John, Victualler, Well Run Dimple, 58, Fargate Alsop Thomas, Victualler, Chequers, 43, Coal Pit Lane Amery Abraham, Victualler, Crown And Cushion, 8, Old Street. P. Appleyard John, Victualler, Waggon And Horses, 13, Arundel Street Arinitage Benjamin, Victualler, Saddle Inn, West St. Arnold Luke, Victualler, Hussar, 13, Scotland St, Baker William, Victualler, Balloon Tavern, Sycamore Street Beadle Elizabeth, Victualler, Old London Apprentice, 25, Beal Enoch, Victualler, Grapes Inn, 53, Trippet Lane Beardshaw Jonathan, Victualler, Ball, 17, Hawley Croft Beet Benjamin, Victualler, Shakespear Inn, 48, Gibraltar St. Beet Edward, Victualler, Seven Stars, 78, Trippet In. Belk John, Victualler, Red Lion, Duke St. P. Benson Joseph, Victualler, Old Crown, Little Sheffield Beresford William, Victualler, Cossack, 19, Howard St. Biggin Thomas, Victualler, Chequers, And Scissor Manufacturer Birks John, Victualler, Stag Inn, 14, Carver St. Biuns James, Victualler, Bridge Inn, Bridgehouses Brailsford Mary, Victualler, Cross Keys, Shude Hill Bramley Mary, Victualler, Union, And Liquor Merchant, 7 Bramley Thomas, Victualler, Dog And Partridge, And Liquor Bray George, Victualler, Ball, 4, Lambert St. Bray John, Victualler, Little Tankards, West Bar Green Bray Joseph, Victualler, Ball, Green In. Bray Joseph, Victualler, Industry, And Wine And Spirit Dealer Bridge Jacob, Victualler, Green Man, 4, New Church St. Brindley James, Victualler, Checquers, Rough Bank, P. Broadbent John, Victualler, Bull And Mouth Inn, Waingate Broadley William, Victualler, Devonshire Arms, Division St. Brumby Charles, Victualler, Bay Childers, (And Billiards) High Street Byre Benjamin, Victualler, Old Turk'S Head, 59, Scotland St. Cadrnan John, Victualler, Prince Of Wales, 1, Sycamore St. Carriss Rohert, Victualler, Barrel, 13, Pond St. Chadwick William, Victualler, Nursery Tavern, Nursery St Chambers William, Victualler, Barrel, 24, Water Ln. Champion Isaac, Victualler; Hope & Anchor Bridgehouses Clark George, Victualler, White Lion, 2, Wicker Cockin William, Victualler, Union, 16, Lambert St. Collier George, Victualler, Old Cricket Players, 69, Coal Pit Lane Cooke John, Victualler, Grey Horse, And Licensed To Let Saddle Horses And Gigs, High Street Cooper George, Victualler, Reuben'S Head, 43, Burgess Street Cooper John, Victualler, Green Dragon, 12, Queen Street Cooper Joseph, Victualler, Falcon Inn, 63, Pea Croft Cooper Martha, Victualler, Hare And Hounds, 36, Trinity St. Cooper William, Victualler, Sir John Falstaff, 66, Wicker Corker Alice, Victualler, Vine Tavern, 17, Furnace Hill Could Jonathan, Victualler, Brown Cow, 1, Red Croft Couldez?*!In, Victualler, Robin Hood, 74, Duke Street, P. Cowley Leonard, Victualler, Angel Inn, 105, South St. Crantham Robert, Victualler, Cherry Tree, Gibraltar Street Crawahaw Cassey, Victualler, Bay Horse, 29, Westbar Green Crich John, Victualler, Black Swan Inn, 2, Snig Hill Crowushaw Thomas, Victualler, Horse And Garter, 34, Daflin Joseph, Victualler, Dolphin, Brocco (Bank?) Daft Frederick, Victualler, Coach And Horses, 1, Water In. Daft John, Victualler, Cutler'S Arms, And Nottingham House, Darling Mary, Victualler, Three Whitesmiths, 1, Bridge St. Deakin Peter, Victualler, Great Tankard, 62, West Bar Green Doughty James, Victualler, Greyhound, 30, Gibraltar St. Dutton John, Victualler, Pheasant Inn, 40, Carver St. Dyson John, Victualler, Swan With Two Necks, 8, Furnival St. Ellison Luke, Victualler, Barrel, Pinstone St. Elliss Joseph, Victualler, Twelve O'Clock, Bottom Of Wicker Elliss Sarah, Victualler, Blue Bell, High St. Elsworth Edward, Victualler, Royal Oak, West Bar Green Emmett Joseph, Victualler, Black Swan, 9, Burgess St. Fearn George, Victualler, Brown Cow, Radford Street Fearnehough William, Victualler, Ball, Pea Croft Fearnley William, Victualler, Rose And Crown, Silver Street Featherstone Willi Am, Victualler, St. Ledger'S Inn, Pinstone St. Fellsten Thomas, Victualler, Ball, 62, Wicker Fielding Hannah, Victuler; Punch Bowl, 69, South St. Flakes William, Victualler, Crown And Shakespear, 10, Sycamore Street Flint William, Victualler, Parrot, South Street Fowler Robert, Victualler, Ship, 14, Water Lane Fox Joseph, Paviour And Victualler, Star, 26, Gibraltar St. Frith Jessey, Victualler, Milton Arms, Bailey Lane Furniss Thomas, Victualler, Old Crown, Grindlegate Garside Joseph, Victualler, Coachmakers' Arms, South Street Gillatt Enoch, Victualler, Golden Cock; 53, Broad Street, P. Goodwin James, Victualler, Anvil, South Street Greaves Charles, Victualler, Corn Mill Inn, 20, Smithfield Greaves George, Victualler, George And Dragon, 91, West ? Green Joseph, Victualler, Catler'S Arms, 3, New Church St. Greenwood Richard, Victualler, Daggers Ian, Market Place Gyte William, Victualler, Pie House, 5, Scotland Street Haigh John, Victualler, Brown Cow, 6, Bridgehouses Haliam William, Victualler, Barrel, 57, Charles St. Hammond Charles, Victualler, White Hart, 5, Waingate Hanson Jervis, Victualler, Cross Daggers, 35, West Bar Green Harker John, Victualler, Blue Bell, 13, Jehu Lane Harrison James, Victualler, Red Lieu, 4$, Coal Pit Lane Hartley Benjanun, Victualler, Mitre Inn, 27, Orchard St. Haslehurst Charles, Victualler, Tankard And Punch Bowl, And Spirit Dealer, 48, Broad St, Park Henderson Samuel, Victualler, Cock, Hollis Croft Henley Margaret, Victualler, Hotel, Haymarket Henson John, Victualler, Bay Childers, Bridge Street Higginbotham John, Victualler, Three Tuns, 16, Orchard St. Hill Henry, Victualler, Peacock Inn, Hoyle Street Hobley Thomas, Victualler, Cleakham Inn, Cornish Place Holland Martha, Victualler, Ball, 39, Forge Lane Holland Robert, Victualler, Blue Boar, 59, West Bar Holland Williara,Victualler, Castle Inn, Snighill, Facing Angel St. Hoole William, Victualler, Barrel, :34, Peacroft Housley George, Victualler, Fortune Of War, 62, Scotland St. Howe Ellis, Victualler, Angel, And Painter, 87, Westbar Green Hughes. Norris, Victualler, 20, Silver St Hulley Francis, Victualler, Globe, 15, Porter St. Hunt Thomas, Victualler, Ball Inn, Furnace Hill Hunter William, Victualler, Gate, 45, Duke Street, P. Husband William Victualler, Barrel, Hawley Croft Hutchinson William, Victualler, Crown, 10, Pinstone St. Jackson Joseph, Victualler, Cannon, 8, Scotland St. Jackson Richard, Victualler, Woolpack, Eat St. ? Kay Thomas, Victualler, Tankard, 27, Pond St. Kinder Mary, Victualler, Hen And Chickens, Castle Green Lamb Amy, Victualler, Lamb, 31, Howard St. Lambert John, Victualler, Tontine Inn, (Posting House) Law William, Victualler, Packhorse, 09, Westbar Lawton John, Victualler, King'S Head, Neeps End Lbbotson Thomas, `Victualler, Cock, 6, Paradise Square Lee Thomas, Victualler, Bay Horse, 89, South St. Linley Samuel, Victualler, Oxford Blue, 15, Burgess St. Lloyd Faulk,Victualler, White Lion, 25, West Bar Green Lnwton Mary, Victualler, Crown, 8, Duke Street, P. Lockwood Samuel, Victualler, Union, Bridgehouses Loy J. Victualler, Brick Makers Arms, Coalpit Lane Lyre Elizabeth, Victualler, Ball, 30, Duke Street P. Machan Joseph, Victualler, Old Harrow, Harvest Lane Marples George, Victualler, Stag, 14, Carver St. Marshall Henry, Victualler, Ball, 28, Townhead St. Marshall James, Victualler, Woodman, South St Mason Jane, Victualler, Feathers, 55, High At. P. Matthewman Mary, Victualler, Sportsman, Bridgehouses Maweon Michael Sefton, Victualler, White Horse, 22 Solly St. Merril John, Victualler, Star, And Penknife Manufacturer, 38 Pea Croft Middleton Edward, Victualler, Dog And Partridge, 53 Coal Pit Lane Mirfin Thomas, Victualler, Gate, Hollis Croft Mitward Ann, Victualler, Black Horse, Howard St. Moore George, Victualler, White Bear, High St. Moorhouse Thomas, Victualler,, Red Lion, 32, Hartshead Morton Sarah, Victualler, Rockingham, Rockingham St Mosley George, Victualler, King And Miller, 76, Norfolk St. Neville William, Victualler, Neville'S Tavern, Campo Lane Norman William, Victualler, Sportsman's Inn, 21, West Bar Ogden Jeremiah, Victualler, Ball, 61, Pye Bank Ogle Joshua, Victualler, Mermaid, Orchard St. Okiham Llanimtb, Victualler5 Black Horse, Jericho Pallett George, Victualler, Golden Ball, Grindle Gate Pattinson Ann, Victualler, Spread Eagle, And Spirit Dealer Perkinton Joshua, Victualler, Red Lion, 54, Holly St. Petty Mary, Victualler', Ball, 56, Pond Lane Pinder John, Victualler, Barrel, 3, Pond St. Platta Robert, Victualler, Black Swan, 3, Fargate Priest Elizabeth, Victualler, Turk'S Head, Scotland St. Pryor Samuel, Victualler, Dove And Rainbow,Hartahsead Rainsay Thomas, Victualler, Cup, Market St. Reynolds George, Victualler, Three Tuna, 22, Bridge St Richards John, Victualler, Fountain, 7, Pinfold St. Richardson William, Victualler, Traveller'S Inn, 10, Snig Hill Robinson Thomas, Victualler, Milton'S Head, Allen St Rodgers Thomas, Victualler, Royal Oak, 8, Pond St. Rose John, Victualler, File Smith'S Arms, 91, Pea Croft Rose Thomas, Victualler, Bee Hive, Glossop Road Saville George, Victualler, Pump Tavern, 4, Earl St. Sayles William, Victualler, Ball Jim, , Norfolk St. Saynor John, `Victualler, Bowling Green, Barrack Tavern Schofield Anthony, Victualler, Cutler'S Inn, 86 Fargate Shaw Elizabeth, Victualler, Yellow Lion, Coalpit Lane Shaw Joseph, Victualler, Ball, Burgess St. Shin Elms, Victualler Wellington Tavern, 10, Coalpit Lane Shirt Joseph, Victualler, White Horse, 33, Copper St Shirtcliff John, Victualler, Fox And Duck Inn, 96, Broad Lane Shirteliff Joseph, Victualler? St. George'S Tavern, 35, Broad Simmonite John, Victualler, Navigation Inn, Castle Fields Simpson James, Victualler, Anvil, 23, Waingate Simpson Thomas, Victualler, Barrel, 92, Broad St. P. Slack Ann, Victualler, Finer Delis, Angel St. Smith Benjamin, Victualler, King'S Arms, 9? Fargate Smith Benjamin, Victualler, Three Cranes, 18, Queen St. Smith James, Victualler, Punch Bowl, 35, Bridge St. Smith John, Victualler, Pheasant Ian, Broad St. P. Sowter Whittington, Victualler Barrel, I, Townhead St. Staniforth James, Victualler, Three Tuns, Silver St. Head Staniforth Luke, Victualler, (Black Swan) 16, Pond St, Steer Joseph, Victualler, Royal Oak, Hollis Croft Stephens Antipas, Victualler, Golden Ball, Campo Lane. Stephenson Job, Victualler, Rose And Crown, 29, Waingate Stringer Joseph, Victualler, Blue Boy, Moor Fields Swallow William, Victualler, Grapes, Church St. Sykes George, Victualler, Home And Jockey, 10, Tenter St Tasker John, Victualler, Nagshead, Nagshead Yd. Haymarket Taylor John, Victualler, Queen'S Head, 14, Sheaf St. Taylor Joseph, Victualler, Union, 31, Furnace Hill Thorpe John, Victualler, Punch Bowl, Silver St, Head Townend William, Victualler, Ball, 23, Oborne St. Traviss William, Victualler, Queen'S Head, 13, Castle St. Turner Peter, Victualler, Ball, Broad Lane Turner Samuel, Victualler, Shades, Wine And Spirit Merchant, Turton Thomas, Victualler, Bull'S Head, 36, Duke St. Tyne Sarah, Victualler, Britannhi, 37, Portobello St, Wade Samuel, Victualler, Ball, Broad St. P. Wadingham George, Victualler, Elephant, 83, Norfolk St. Wagstaff William, Victualler, Rodney Arms, Doncaster House, Ward James, Victualler, Devonshire Arms, 2, South St. Ward William, Victualler, Cross Keys, 91, Pea Croft Wardley Isaac, Victualler, Union, Spirit Dealer, 18, Fargate Wash Robert, Victualler, Sir F. Burdett, 9, Pond Hill Watson James, Victualler, Mason'S Arms, 18, Bridge St. Webster Mary, Victualler, Golden Lion, 2, Forge Lane Webster Thomas, Victualler, Blue Boar, 6, Workhouse Lane Whesley ??(Hotge, Victualler, Brown Beat, 34, Norfolk St. White Richard, Victualler, Bricklayers Arms, Jehu Lane Wilby Benjamin, Victualler, Green Man, 7, Broad St. P Wilde George, Victualler, Star, 35, White Croft Wilde Mary, Victualler, Brown Cow, 1, Broad Lane Wilson George, Victualler, Globe, 54, Broad St. P. Wilson Joseph, Victualler, Hague Tree Snow Lane, P. Wilson Thomas, Victualler, Bull, Caver St.
  2. GALES & MARTIN BUSINESS DIRECTORY 1787 ABBOT ELI-SILK DYER-WEST BAR GREEN ABDY JOHN-CUTLER-HOWARD ST ADDY WILLIAM-CUTLER-WEST BAR GREEN ALCARD JAMES-GROCER-SCOTLAND ST ALCOCK JOHN & CO-INK POT MAKERS-BAILEY FIELD ALDHAM WILLIAM-GROCER-CHANGE ALLEY ALLEN GEORGE&ROBERT-LINENDRAPERS&TEA DEALERS-NEW STREET ALLEN WIDOW-LANTERN LIGHT & COMB MAKER-SCARGILL CROFT ALLEN THOMAS-SNUFFER MAKER-BAILEY FIELD ALLEN THOMAS-MASTER OF CHARITY SCHOOL-CHURCH YARD ALMOND JAMES-MANUFACTUROR OF PLATED GOODS-WEST BAR ALMOND JOHN-VICTUALLER-TOWNHEAD CROSS ALMOND ROGER-VICTUALLER-BLIND LANE ALSOP GEORGE-VICTUALLER-PONDS ALSOP LUKE-CUTLER-COALPIT LANE ALSOP SAMUEL-FOUNDER & ANVIL MAKER-SHEFFIELD MOOR AMORY GEORGE-ROPER,FLAXDRESSER,LINENDRAPER-HARTSHEAD AMORY WIDOW-VICTUALLER-HIGH STREET ANDERTON JOHN-DEALER IN FLOUR-PEA CROFT ANTT JOSEPH&SON-FACTORS-LAMBERT CROFT ANT JAMES-DEALER IN CLOATHS ETC-BURGESS STREET APPLEBY,SCHOLFIELD & CO-FOUNDERS-GIBRALTER ARDRON JOHN-GROCER-TRUELOVE'S GUTTER ARMFIELD WILLIAM-LINENDRAPER-KING STREET ASH RICHARD-CUTLER-YOUNG STREET ASHFORTH,ELLIS,WILSON,HAWKSLEY-MANU.SILVER&PLATED GOODS-ANGEL STREET ASHFORTH SAMUEL-CUTLER-PARK ASHMORE JOHN-VICTUALLER-PARK ASHTON ADAM-CARPENTER&OVERSEER,WATER WKS-BRINSWORTH'S ORCHARD BAGNALL JOHN-DYER-PONDS BAILEY&EADON-SCISSORSMITHS,IRONMONGERS,FACTORS-WESTBAR BANKS WILLIAM-BUTTONMAKER-PORTOBELLO BARBER&GENN-SAW&FENDER MKRS-SPRING STREET BARDWELL JOHN-AUCTIONEER-NORFOLK STREET BARKER JOSEPH-BAKER-SCOTLAND STREET BARLOW&CO-SCISSORSMITHS-MEADOW STREET BARLOW,LONGDEN & CO-SCISSORSMITHS-SCOTLAND STREET BARLOW WILLIAM-BAKER-TRUELOVE'S GUTTER BARLOW JOHN-CUTLER-CAMPO LANE BARDSLEY JAMES-PAWNBROKER-WESTBAR BARNSLEY GEORGE-VICTUALLER-TRUELOVE'S GUTTER BARNES ISAAC-CUTLER-CAMPO LANE BARNES THOMAS-CUTLER-SMITHFIELD BARTRAM JAMES-HORN TURNER-SCOTLAND STREET BATEMAN GEORGE-CUTLER-SMITHFIELD BATES SAMUEL&GEORGE-FILESMITHS-SPRING STREET BATES JAMES-MALT & CHEESE FACTOR-TRUELOVE'S GUTTER BATTY WIDOW-COOPER-TOWNHEAD WELL BATTIE JAMES-WATCHMAKER-WAINGATE BAYLEY ROBERT & RICHARD IRONMONGERS,HARDWAREMEN-HIGH STREET BAYLIFFE REV.GEORGE-CURATE OF ECCLESALL-NEW STREET BAYLIFFE REV WILLIAM-ASSISTANT CURATE OF THE NEW CHURCH-NEW STREET BEAL RICHARD-SHOPKEEPER-COALPIT LANE BEARD SAMUEL-VICTUALLER-FURNACE LANE BEARD JAMES-VICTUALLER-COALPIT LANE BEARDSHAW WILLIAM-CUTLER-SILVER STREET BEARDSHAW JOHN-VICTUALLER-HOLLES CROFT BEARDSALL FRANCIS-HOTEL INN-TOP OF WAIN GATE BEATSON THOMAS-SHEATHER-PARK BEELY JOHN-VICTUALLER-SMITHFIELD BEET & SENYERS-CUTLERS-PEA CROFT BEET WIDOW&SONS-CUTLERS-BROAD LANE BEET JOHN-CUTLER-NORFOLK STREET BEET EDWARD-CUTLER-LAMBERT CROFT BEET JERIMIAH-VICTUALLER-NORFOLK STREET BELDON,HOYLAND & CO-SILVER CUTLERS-BURGESS STREET BELL'S & SHEPHERD-SCISSORSMITHS-GIBRALTER BELL BENJAMIN- VICTUALLER-BACK LANE BELL WIDOW-VICTUALLER-COPPER STREET BELLAMY JOHN-INNKEEPER-KING STREET BENNET EDWARD-SUGAR BAKER-UNION STREET BENNET THOMAS-FACTOR-PINSTON LANE BENNET GEORGE-PLUMBER & GLAZIER-FAR GATE BERRY JOSEPH-VIGO BUTTON MAKER-POND LANE BERRY NOAH-DIE SINKER & BUTTON MAKER-SCARGILL CROFT BINCKS WILLIAM-PORTER & BRANDY MERCHANT-PEA CROFT BINGLEY JOHN-CURRIER-JEHU LANE BINNEY JOSEPH-CUTLER-BROAD LANE END BIRKS WILLIAM & JOHN-CUTLERS-UNION STREET BIRKS ISAAC-BUTCHER &VICTUALLER-TRUELOVE'S GUTTER BIRKINSHAW FRANCIS-CUTLER-SILVER STREET BIRTLES ABRAHAM-BRICKLAYER-YOUNG STREET BIRTLES ABRAHAM-VICTUALLER-BURGESS STREET BISHOP GEORGE & SON-EDGETOOL MAKER-BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD BISHOP SAMUEL-BLACKSMITH-BAILEY FIELD BISHOP GEORGE JUN.-BLACKSMITH-BAILEY FIELD BISHOP THOMAS-CUTLER-CHINA SQUARE BLACKBURN JOSEPH-DYER-BONDS BLAIN JOHN-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE-YORK STREET BLAKE THOMAS-FILESMITH-GREEN LANE BLAND THOMAS-FACTOR-QUEEN STREET BLAND JAMES-CASE MAKER-QUEEN STREET BLAND JOHN-VICTUALLER-SNIG HILL BLONK & SON-SCISSORSMITHS-NORFOLK STREET BOOTH,BINKS'S,HARTOP & CO-FOUNDERS BOWER GEORGE-VICTUALLER-SILVER STREET BOWKER WILLIAM-BARBER-HIGH STREET BOWKER JONATHAN-HATTER-WAIN GATE BRADBURY THOMAS-BAKER-WAIN GATE BRADBURY DANIEL-ASSAY MASTER-POND LANE BRADWELL THOMAS-FLAXDRESSER-FAR GATE BRAILSFORD WILLIAM-UPHOLSTERER-NORFOLK STREET BRAILSFORD THOMAS-UPHOLSTERER-HIGH STREET BRAMMALL NICHOLAS-CUTLER-WHITE CROFT BRAMMALL GEORGE-SCISSORSMITH-PINSTON LANE BRAMMALL JAMES-CUTLER-PORTO BELLO BRAMMALL JOHN-FILESMITH-WESTBAR GREEN BRIDDOCK MARTIN-CUTLER-LAMBERT CROFT BRIGHT THOMAS-GENT-HAWLEY CROFT BRIGHT JAMES-BARBER-WESTBAR BRIGHT WIDOW-CUTLER-HOLLES CROFT BRIGHT WIDOW-VICTUALLER-TOP OF SILVER STREET BRITTAIN,WILKINSON & BROWNELL-FACTORS&MANU.OF CUTLERY-ARUNDEL STREET BRITTAIN BENJAMIN-CUTLER-HAWLEY CROFT BRITTLEBANK ABRAHAM-HERMITAGE BOWLING GREEN BROADBENT THOMAS & JOSEPH-MERCHANTS-BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD BROADBENT SAMUEL-FACTOR &AGENT LOMBARD FIRE OFFICE-CASTLE GREEN HEAD BROADBENT DENNIS-SCISSORSMITH-BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD BROADBENT ROGER-BUTCHER-NORFOLK STREET BROADHEAD JOSEPH-GROCER & MALTSTER-SNIG HILL BROADHEAD WILLIAM-CUTLER-BAILEY FIELD BROADHEAD JONATHAN-VICTALLER-BULLSTAKE BROOKES JOHN & SON-FACTORS-FAR GATE BROOKES FRANCIS-CUTLER-NEW STREET BROOKES JAMES-TURNER-FAR GATE BROOKFIELD JOHN-ATTORNEY BROOKFIELD WILLIAM-SCISSORSMITH-TRINITY STREET BROOKFIELD JOHN-VICTUALLER-CHURCH LANE BROOKFIELD GEORGE-VICTUALLER-CAMPO LANE BROOMHEAD BENJAMIN & JOSEPH-FACTORS&MANU. CUTLERY WARES-FAR GATE BROOMHEAD,HINCHCLIFFE&CO-FACT.&MANU.CUTLERY-BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD BROOMHEAD & WARD-CUTLERS-EYRE STREET BROOMHEAD JOSEPH-CUTLER-LAMBERT CROFT BROOMHEAD JOHN-VICTUALLER-PARK BROOMHEAD RICHARD-BUTCHER-WESTBAR BROWN,WHEAT & CO.-MANU.WHITE ,RED LEAD-POND LANE BROWN REVEL-INKPOT MAKER-TRUELOVE'S GUTTER BROWN CORNELIUS-DEALER IN TOYS,HARDWARE-MARKET PLACE BROWN MRS.-MILLINER-CHANGE ALLEY BROWN GEORGE-CUTLER-COALPIT LANE BROWNELL JOHN-IRONMONGER&FACTOR-WEST BAR GREEN BRUNT JONATHAN-PRINTER-KING STREET BRYANT REV THOMAS-MINISTER DISSENTING CHAPEL-SCOTLAND STREET BULHOUSE WILLIAM-VICTUALLER-PARK BULLOCK JOHN-ANVIL MAKER-SMITHFIELD BURCH GEORGE-CUTLER-SPRING STREET BURDITT JOHN-CLASP & COLLAR MAKER-POND LANE BURGEN THOMAS-VIGO BUTTON MKR-HAWLEY CROFT BURNAND ROBERT-LINENDAPER&DLR IN FURNITURE&CLOATHS-MARKET PLACE BURTON MICHAEL-ATTORNEY-PARADISE SQUARE BURTON WILLIAM-SURGEON &MAN MIDWIFE BUTLER WILLIAM-CUTLER-TRINITY STREET BUTLER JOHN-DEALER IN FLOUR ETC.TOWNHEAD WELL BUTLER STEPHEN-CUTLER-TOWNHEAD WELL BUTTERWORTH JOHN-EDGETOOL MAKER-PEA CROFT CADMAN PETER, &CO-CUTLERSNORFOLK STREET CADMAN LUKE-CUTLER-NORFOLK STREET CADMAN DAVID-CUTLER-LONGSTONE LANE CADMAN BENJAMIN-FILESMITH-LAMBERT CROFT CADMAN GEORGE-CUTLER-BANK CALACK WILLIAM- BUTCHER & VICTUALLER-CAMPO LANE CAM JAMES-FILESMITH-NORFOLK STREET CAM WIDOW-VICTUALLER-FAR GATE CARNELL JOSEPH-CUTLER-WESTBAR GREEN CARLTON JOHN-CUTLER- FAR GATE CARR GEORGE & SON-SAW MANUFACTURERS-ISLE CARR THOMAS-VICTUALLER-FAR GATE CASTLE JOHN-VICTUALLER-CHINA SQUARE CAWTON JOSHUA & SONS-CUTLERS-SNIG HILL CHADWICK REV CHARLES-VICAR TINSLEY & MASTER FREE GRAMMAR SCOOL -CAMPO LANE CHALONER THOMAS-VICTUALLER-PARK CHAMPION JAMES-RAZOR STRAP MAKER-SCOTLAND STREET CHAMPION PETER-BAKER-CHURCH LANE CHAPMAN GEORGE-FLAXDRESSER-NEW STREET CHENEY HUGH-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE-CHURCHYARD CHEW WILLIAM-HAIR DRESSER-HIGH STREET CLARBOUR BENJAMIN-FORKMAKER-POND LANE CLARK THOMAS-INNKEEPER-MARKET PLACE CLARK JONATHAN-CUTLER-NORFOLK STREET CLIFTON HENRY-HAIRDRESSER-TRUELOVE'S GUTTER CLOSE GEORGE-BRAZIER & TINMAN-HIGH STREET CLOSE JOHN-LANTERN LIGHT MAKER-POND LANE CLOUGH & TAYLOR-FACTORS-HIGH STREET CLOUGH MRS-MILLINER-HIGH STREET COCKAYNE WILLIAM-BREECHES MAKER-BULL STAKE COCKAYNE JOHN-GARDENER-BOTTOM OF PEA CROFT COLDWELL RICHARD-VICTUALLER-WESTBAR GREEN COLLEY, NEWBOULD & CO-SAW & FENDER MANUF.-SHEFFIELD MOOR COLLEY WIDOW-SCISSORSMITH-CAMPO LANE COLLEY EMANUEL-SCISSORSMITH-CHINA SQUARE COLLEY & BRADY-CUTLERS-BURGESS STREET COLLEY GEORGE-SCISSORSMITH-BURGESS STREET COLLEY WILLIAM-PAPER MAKER-HIGH STREET COLTON WILLIAM-VICTUALLER-HAWLEY CROFT COLSTON JOSEPH-GARDENER-SNIGHILL CONYERS RICHARD-VICTUALLER-CARVER STREET COOK JOHN-HAIRDRESSER & PERFUMER-WAIN GATE COOK JOHN-GROCER-CHURCH LANE COOPER WILLIAM-DEALER IN BUTTER &GROCERIES-HARTSHEAD COOPER WILLIAM & ROBERT-SCISSORSMITHS-RATTEN ROW COOPER RICHARD-VICTUALLER-SNIGHILL COOPER EDWARD-BUTTON MAKER-FAR GATE CORKER JOHN-SCISSORSMITH-MEADOW STREET CORKER JOHN-FILESMITH-FURNACE HILL CORNTHWAITE WIDOW-VICTUALLER-SMITHFIELD COSINS WIDOW-VIGO BUTTON MAKER-PARK COSINS ABRAHAM-JEWELLER & SILVERSMITH & CHINAMAN-ANGEL STREET COWEN JOHN-VIGO BUTTON MAKER-LAMBERT CROFT COWEN JOHN-BUTTON MAKER & DYE SINKER-WHITE CROFT CRABTREE THOMAS-CUTLER-PEA CROFT CRESWICK JAMES-FILESMITH PAPER & RAG MERCHANT-PONDS CRESWICK JOSEPH-CUTLER-QUEEN STREET CROFTS BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER-POND LANE CROME JOHN-BOOKBINDER-CAMPO LANE CROSS WIDOW-CUT GLASS MANUFACTURER-FAR GATE CROOKES JOHN-SHERIFFS BALIFF & CONSTABLE-NORFOLK STREET CROOKES JONATHAN-CUTLER-SCOTLAND STREET CROOKES SAMUEL-CUTLER-GREEN LANE CROOKES JAMES & SONS-CUTLERS-NEW STREET CROOKES JOHN-FILESMITH-COLSTON CROFT CROOKES JOHN-CUTLER-SMITHFIELD CURR JOHN-SUPERINTENDANT OF COAL WORKS-OF HIS GRACE DUKE OF NORFOLK CURTLAND JOHN-HAFT PRESSER-POND LANE CUTLER WILLIAM & SONS-FILESMITHS-HIGH STREET DAM HENRY-VICTUALLER-FAR GATE DANIELL CHRISTOPHER-TAILOR-HARTSHEAD DARBY WILLIAM & CO-WHOLESALE & RETAIL DLRS WINE SPIRITS-HARTSHEAD DARWIN BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER-POND LANE DARWIN THOMAS-ANVIL & ROLLER MAKER-SHUDE HILL DAVENPORT WILLIAM-BREECHES MAKER-MARKET PLACE DAVENPORT SAMUEL-HAFT PRESSER-PEA CROFT DAVIES MORGAN-PAWNBROKER-WESTBAR DAVISON LEMUEL & CO-CUTLERS-SMITHFIELD DEAKIN,SMITH & CO-MANUF.SILVER & PLATED GOODS-HAWLEY CROFT DEAKIN SAMUEL-FACTOR-CHANGE ALLEY DEAKIN GEORGE-CURRIER-ANGEL STREET DEARDEN JOHN-SCISSORSMITH-SMITHFIELD DENTON SAMUEL-PLUMBER GLAZIER-TOP OF SILVER STREET DERWENT DANIEL-VICTUALLER-BARKERS POOL DEWSNAP GEORGE & WILLIAM-CUTLERS-LAMBERT CROFT DEWSNAP JOHN-CUTLER-QUEEN STREET DEWSNAP JOSHUA-CUTLER-TRINITY STREET DEWSBURY THOMAS-VICTUALLER-COAL PIT LANE DICKINSON & BARKER-TOBACCONISTS & SNUFF MAKERS-FAR GATE DICKINSON THOMAS-CUTLER-FURNACE HILL DICKINSON WIDOW-GROCER-TOWNHEAD-CROSS DICKINSON MILS-MILLINER-CAMPO LANE DIDSBURY GILBERT-MERCER & DRAPER-MARKET PLACE DIXON JAMES-CUTLER-CAMPO LANE DIXON JAMES-JOINERS TOOL MAKER-SILVER STREET DONCASTER SAMUEL-GROCER & TALLOW CHANDLER-FURNACE HILL DONCASTER DANIEL-FILESMITH-COPPER STREET DORE GEORGE-VICTUALLER-SMITHFIELD DOWNES REV.JOHN-CURATE HOSPITAL CHAPEL-NORFOLK STREET DOWNING-----BUTCHER-WEST BAR DOWNING DANIEL-TAILOR-WAIN GATE DRABBLE ENOCH-CUTLER-GREEN LANE DRAKE THOMAS-WHITESMITH-LONGSTONE LANE DUCKENFIELD JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-BURGESS STREET DUKE HENRY-CUTLER-TRINITY STREET DUNCAN JOHN-MD-ANGEL STREET DUNGWORTH JONATHAN-CUTLER-MEADOW STREET DUNN WILLIAM & CO-CUTLERS-GRINDLE GATE EADON JOHN-MASTER FREEWRITING SCHOOL-CAMPO LANE EADON MOSES-SCHOOLMASTER-MEADOW STREET EATON JONATHAN-BRICKLAYER-QUEEN STREET EDMONDSON JAMES-SADDLER-MARKET PLACE ELLIOT GEORGE-GENT-NORFOLK STREET ELLIOT SAMUEL-FACTOR-QUEEN STREET ELLIOT CHARLES-GROCER-HIGH STREET ELLIOT JAMES-BREECHES MAKER-HIGH STREET ELLIOT GEORGE-COOPER-VICARAGE CROFT ELLIS WIDOW & SONS-WESTBAR GREEN ELLIS CHARLES-PATTEN & CLOG MAKER-SNIGHILL ELLIS WIDOW-VICTUALLER-BULLSTAKE EMERSON ROBERT-CUTLER-BURGESS STREET EPWORTH JOSEPH-CLERK TO REV.JAMES WILKINSON-NEAR BROOM HALL EPWORTH JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-LAMBERT CROFT EVANS REV. JOSEPH-MINISTER UPPER CHAPEL-PORTO BELLO EVANS WILLIAM-BRAZIER & TINMAN-BULLSTAKE EYRE VINCENT ESQ.-STEWARD TO DUKE OF NORFOLK-FAR GATE EYRE JOHN & CO-CUTLERS -CHINA SQUARE EYRE JOHN-WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALER WINE SPIRITS-HARTSHEAD EYRE JON-DEALER IN FLOUR &C-CASTLE GREEN EYRE JOSEPH-APPRAISER & CONSTABLE-SHUDE HILL YRE SAMUEL-SCISORSMITH-WEST BAR GREEN EYRE SAMUEL-VICTUALLER-WEST BAR FAIRBANKWILLIAM-SURVEYOR-HIGHFIELD FANSHAW JOHN-COOPER-WEST BAR GREEN FENTON,CRESWICK,OAKES & CO-MANUF.SILVER & PLATED GOODS MULBERRY STREET FENTON WIDOW-GROCER &C-WESTBAR GREEN FENTON JOHN-VICTUALLER-PEA CROFT FISHER JOHN-HAFT PRESSER-CHURCH LANE FISHER MICHAEL-VICTUALLER-HARTSHEAD FISHER GEORGE-SHEATHER-RED CROFT FITZHERBERT LUKE-BARBER-GRINDLE GATE FORWARD JOHN-VICTUALLER-PAADISE SQUARE FOSTER JAMES-GROCER-WESTBAR FOSTER JOHN-METAL BUTTON MAKER-SHUDE HILL FOSTER EDWARD-HACKNEY KEEPER-CASTLE GREEN FOWLER WILLIAM-SCISSORSMITH-WESTBAR GREEN FOWLER SAMUEL-SCISSORSMITH-WESTBAR FOWLER ISAIAH-CUTLER-COALPIT LANE FOWLER SAMUEL-VICTUALLER-COALPIT LANE FOX & NORRIS-CUTLERS WESTBAR FOX THOMAS-GENT-MILK STREET FOX WILLIAM-CUTLER-WESTBAR FOX GODFREY-GAOLER & LIBERTY BALIFF-KING STREET FOX JOHN-CUTLER-PARK FOX GEORGE-VICTUALLER-SMITHFIELD FRANCE JONATHAN-FILESMITH-BLIND LANE FRANCE GEORGE-HAIRDRESSER-BULLSTAKE FRANKISH WIDOW-VICTUALLER-HIGH STREET FRITH & ATKIN-GROCERS-KING STREET FRITH JOSEPH-GROCER-SNIG HILL FRITH FRANCIS-GROCER-WESTBAR FRITH WILLIAM-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE-WESTBAR FROGGAT & APPLEBY-CARPENTERS & JOINERS-PARK FROST THOMAS-TAILOR & DEALER IN CLOATHS-HIGH STREET FURNISS BENJAMIN-GROCER-FAR GATE FURNISS JAMES-GROCER-MARKET PLACE FURNISS MATTHIAS-GROCER-NORFOLK STREET FURNISS JOHN-SCISSORSMITH-SILVER STREET GALES & MARTIN-PRINTERS & BOOKBINDERS-HARTSHEAD GALES JOSEPH-BOOKSELLER,STATIONER,PRINTSELLER,AUCTIONEER,AGENT TO ROYAL EXCHANGE FIRE OFFICE-HARTSHEAD GAIKING JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-BULLSTAKE GARNET BRICE-HAIRDRESSER & PERFUMER-HIGH STREET *** SAMUEL-COALPIT LANE GENN SAMUEL-FILESMITH-SMITHFIELD CHERWIN JACOB-MERCHANT-PARADISE SQUARE GILL JOHN-VICTUALLER-SHUDE HILL GILLOT MALIN-EDGETOOL MAKER-FAR GATE GLOSSOP WIDOW-DEALER IN FLOUR &C-WESTBAR GODDARD CHARLES-STAYMAKER-NORFOLK STREET GOLD JONATHAN-SCISSORSMITH-PARK GOLDEN JOHN-PLUMBER GLAZIER-CHURCH LANE GOODALL WIDOW-VICTUALLER-WESTBAR GOODALL JOHN-BRICKLAYER & VICTUALLER-QUEEN STREET GOODLAD SAMUEL-VICTUALLER & MUSICIAN-PARADISE SQUARE GOODMAN MICHAEL-PAWNBROKER-WESTBAR GOODWIN REV.EDWARD-CURATE OF ATTERCLIFFE-BANKS GOODWIN JOHN-GROCER-PINSTON LANE GOOLSBURY ROBERT-TAILOR-YORK STREET GOSLING GEORGE-CABINET MAKER,UPHOLSTERER-FAR GATE GRAY & PARR-BLACKSMITHS-WAIN GATE GRAY WILLIAM-VICTUALLER-CASTLE FOLD GRAY JOHN-VICTUALLER-COLSTON CROFT GRAY JOHN-BLACKSMITH-LITTLE SHEFFIELD GRAYSON JOHN-STAYMAKER-CAMPO LANE GREASBY JOSEPH-INNKEEPER-WESTBAR GREAVES & WOODHEAD-MERCHANTS-NORFOLK STREET GREAVES JOHN & SON-MERCHANTS-FAR GATE GREAVES SAMUEL-GROCER-FAR GATE GREAVES GEORGE-FILESMITH-WESTBAR GREEN GREAVES ABRAHAM-SHEARSMITH-PEA CROFT GREAVES THOMAS-SCISSORSMITH-GIBRALTER GREAVES THOMAS-CUTLER-CHURCH LANE GREAVES EDWARD-VICTUALLER-HOLLES CROFT GREAVES JOHN-VICTUALLER-HIGH STREET GREAVES JONADAB-BRASS FOUNDER-CHURCH LANE GREEN HANNAH & SON-EDGETOOL MAKERS-BURGESS STREET GREEN WILLIAM & CO-SILVER CUTLERS-EYRE STREET GREEN JANE & SONS-EDGE TOOL MAKERS-SCOTLAND STREET GREEN JOHN-CUTLER-SIMS CROFT GREEN JAMES-CUTLER-NORFOLK STREET GREEN JONATHAN-CUTLER-BAILEY FIELD GREEN SAMUEL-COMB MAKER-BURGESS STREET GREEN THOMAS-CUTLER-SPRING STREET GREEN JOHN-VICTUALLER-WEST BAR GREEN GREEN MATTHEW-VICTUALLER-IRISH CROSS GREEN JAMES-CARPENTER,JOINER-CROSS STREET GREEN SAMUEL-VICTUALLER & COOK-PARADISE SQUARE GREEN AMOS-GROCER &C-BURGESS STREET GREENWOOD JAMES-SCHOOLMASTER-NORFOLK STREET GREENWOOD DAVID-SCHOOLMASTER-NORFOLK STREET GREGORY RICHARD-CHEESE FACTOR-BULLSTAKE GROVES RICHARD SAW MAKER-TRINITY STREET GUEST THOMAS-CHAIR MAKER-IRISH CROSS HAGGERS JOHN-RETAILER OF SPIRITS-WAIN GATE HAGUE & PARKIN-STEEL REFINERS-GIBRALTER HAGUE & NOWIL-CUTLERS-MEADOW STREET HAGUE JOHN-VICTUALLER-COALPIT LANE HAGUE THOMAS VICTUALLER-PARK HAINES MISS-MILLINER-CHINA SQUARE HALL SAMUEL & CO-HAT MANUF.HIGH STREET HALL THOMAS-BUTCHER,VICTUALLER-HARTSHEAD HALL JOSEPH-COMB,TOY MAKER-KING STREET HALL JOSEPH-BULLSTAKE HALL HENRY-CUTLER-UNION STREET HALL WILLIAM-SHOEMAKER-HIGH STREET HALL THOMAS-CUTLER-MEADOW STREET HALL THOMAS-EDGETOOL MAKER-PEA CROFT HALL JONATHAN-CUTLER-CHINA SQUARE HALL JAMES-HAIR DRESSER-BARKER POOL HALL THOMAS-VICTUALLER-BURGESS STREET HALL JOHN-SEXTON,CARPENTER,JOINER-CHURCHYARD HALL SAMUEL-CONSTABLE & TOWNS BEADLE-CHURCH LANE HALLAM MARY-LANCET MAKER-NORFOLK STREET HALLAM JAMES-VICTUALLER,CUTLER-NORFOLK STREET HALLAM FRANCIS-BUTCHER-CASTLE FOLD HANCOCK JOSEPH-PLATED METAL ROLLER-UNION STREET HANCOCK CHARLES-CUTLER-SCOTLAND STREET HANDLEY MRS-DRUGGIST-ANGEL STREET HANDLEY ROBERT-PERUKE MAKER-HARTSHEAD HANSON BARNET-COLLAR MAKER-WAIN GATE HARDWICK THOMAS-VICTUALLER-BULLSTAKE HARDY JOHN-SHOEMAKER-HARTSHEAD HARPHAM ABRAHAM-VICTUALLER-RED CROFT HARMAR REV.JOHN-MINISTER INDEPENDANT CHAPEL-NORFOL STREET HARMAR SAMUEL-GROCER,MALTSTER-PARADISE SQUARE HARRIS THOMAS-ENGRAVER,COPPER PLATE PRINTER-CHANGE ALLEY HARRISON JOHN-CUTLER-CAMPO LANE HARROP JAMES-HAFT PRESSER-PARK HARTLEY JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-MARKET PLACE HARTLEY GEORGE-GROCER-CHURCH LANE HARWAR CHARLES-CUTLER-HIGH STREET HATFIELD JOHN-VICTUALLER-TRUELOVES GUTTER HAWKE FRANCIS & SON-FILESMITHS-ALLEN LANE HAWKE JOHN-VICTUALLER-SPRING STREET HAWKE WIDOW-BAKER-CHURCH LANE HAWKSLEY JOSEPH-FILESMITH-CASTLE FOLD HAWKSLEY JOSHUA-FILESMITH-WESTBAR HAWKSWORTH & SHARROW-MERCHANTS,MANUF. OF CUTLERY WARES-GRINDLE GATE HAWKSWORTH JOHN-WHOLESALE BREWER-CAMPO LANE HAWKSWORTH CHRISTOPHER-CUTLER-SILVER STREET HAWLEY GEORGE-VICTUALLER-HAWLEY CROFT HEALD MATHEW-SADDLER-MARKET PLACE HEATHCOTE THOMAS-BUTCHER-WESTBAR GREEN HEDLEY JOSEPH-STAY & BUTTON MAKER-CHANGE ALLEY HEDLEY SAMUEL-GROCER-CHANGE ALLEY HEIFER JAMES-BARBER-WESTBAR GREEN HELEWELL & WHITE-GROCERS,TALLOW CHANDLERS-MARKET PLACE HELLEN & PROCTER -LANTERN LIGHT MAKER-SHEFFIELD MOOR HELLEN RATCLIFF-RAZOR STRAP MAKER-FAR GATE HELIFIELD SAMUEL-VICTUALLER-GRINDLE GATE HEMINGWAY BENJAMIN-CAMPO LANE HENFREY JOHN-SCISSORSMITH-NORFOLK STREET HENSON JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-HIGH STREET HEPPENSTALL JOHN-MERCER, DRAPER-IRISH CROSS HEPPENSTALL GEORGE-WESTBAR HEYWOOD WIDOW-VICTUALLER-RATTEN ROW HIBBERT SAMUEL-CUTLER-BAILEY FIELD HIGGINSON SAMUEL-CUTLER-BURGESS STREET HILL SAMUEL-CLOCK MAKER-BROAD LANE HILL GENN-BUTCHER-ARUNDEL GATE HILTON AMBROSE-HOUSE & SIGN PAINTER HINCHCLIFFE JOSEPH-SCISSORSMITH-POND LANE HINCHCLIFFE ROBERT-SCISSORSMITH-CHINA SQUARE HINCHCLIFFE PETER-VICTUALLER-CHINA SQUARE HINDE JOHN-BUTCHER-BURGESS STREET HIRST SAMUEL-SCHOOLMASTER-SPRING STREET HOBSON JOSEPH-GRINDLE GATE HOBSON JONATHAN-CORN FACTOR-SHUDE HILL HOBSON JOSEPH-BAKER BURGESS STREET HOBSON BENJAMIN-RAZOR CASE MAKER-SCOTLAND STREET HODGKINSON RALPH-DRUGGIST-MARKET PLACE HODGSON JOHN-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE-WAIN GATE HODGSON CHARLES-HINGE,SHOVEL,TROWEL MAKER-WORKHOUSE CROFT HOLBIM JOHN-GROCER-BURGESS STREET HOLDSWORT WILLIAM-SPOON MAKER-WATER LANE HOLLAND JAMES-SHOEMAKER-GRINDLE GATE HOLLAND JOHN-VICTUALLER-FAR GATE HOLLIDAY WILLIAM-PLAISTERER-PARK HOLMES & NICHOLSON-CUTLERS-POND LANE HOLT JAMES-VICTUALLER-COALPIT LANE HOLY DANIEL,WILKINSON & CO-MANUF.SILVER & PLATED GOODS-MULBERRY STREET HOLY & NEWBOULD-BUTTON MAKERS-SHEFFIELD MOOR HOOLE JOHN-BUTTON MAKER-SHEFFIELD MOOR HOOLE FRANCIS-BUTCHER-BROAD LANE HORROCKS WILLIAM-TURNER-FAR GATE HOTHAM WILLIAM-GROCER &C-COALPIT LANE HOULDEN WIDOW-VICTUALLER-GIBRALTER HOULDEN WILLIAM-STEEL REFINER,RAZOR STRAP MKR-MILLSANDS HOUNSFIELD GEORGE-FACTOR-WESTBAR HOUNSFIELD JOHN-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE-BULLSTAKE HOWARD MRS-WHOLESALE & RETAIL WINE,SPIRITS-HIGH STREET HOWSON GEORGE-VICTUALLER,SCISSORSMITH-BLIND LANE HOYLAND,CLARBOUR,BERNARD-CUTLERS-HILL FOOT HOYLAND JOHN-FACTOR,DEALER IRON,STEEL-YORK STREET HOYLAND JOSEPH-SURGEON,MAN MIDWIFE-FAR GATE HOYLAND SAMUEL-VICTUALLER,SCISSORSMITH-BLIND LANE HOYLAND JOSEPH-HAFT PRESSER-CARVER STREET HOYLAND JOHN-CARPET WEAVER-SHUDE HILL HOYLAND JOHN-TAILOR-YORK STREET HOYLE WILLIAM-ATTORNEY-PORT MAHON HUDSONJOHN-CUTLER-WESTBAR GREEN HUDSON JOSEPH-CUTLER-COALPIT LANE HUDSON WILLIAM-RAZORSTRAP MAKER-SCOTLAND STREET HUFTON ANTHONY-GENT-BAILEY FIELD HUFTON THOMAS-SILVERSMITH-RATTEN ROW HUMPHREYS WILLIAM-TEA DEALER-MARKET PLACE HUNTER & TWIGG-SILVER CUTLERS-BAILEY FIELD HUNTER JOHN-DEALER IN FLOUR,MILK-GARDEN WALK HUTCHINSON CHARLES-CUTLER,TURNER-SILVER STREET HUTCHINSON WILLIAM-COACHMAKER & WHEELWRIGHT-SPRING STREET HUTCHINSON JOHN-COACH MAKER,GROCER &C-NORFOLK STREET HUTTON HENRY-CUTLER-COALPIT LANE HYDES ISAAC-VICTUALLER-SNIG HILL IBBERSON JOHN & GEORGE-CUTLERS-GIBRALTER IBBERSON JOHN-HATTER-WESTBAR GREEN IBBOTSON WILLIAM-GROCER,TALLOW CHANDLER-FAR GATE INGHAM WILLIAM-RETAILER OF SPIRITS-JEHU LANE INGLESBY JOHN-VICTUALLER-PARK IREDALE JOHN-CURRIER-TRULOVES GUTTER JACKSON NICHOLAS-FILESMITH-WICKER JACKSON WIDOW-GROCER-WESTBAR JEBSON MATHEW-CUTLER-WESTBAR GREEN JEEVES GEORGE-BRUSHMAKER-FAR GATE JEEVES PETER-HAIRDRESSER-BULLSTAKE JEEVES WIDOW-VICTUALLER-COALPIT LANE JENKINSON JOHN-JOINER,CABINET MAKER-PARADISE SQUARE JENNINGS JOHN-HAFT PRESSER-FAR GATE JENNINGS JOHN-NUMBER SELLER-BAILEY FIELD JERVIS WILLIAM-CUTLER-WHITE CROFT JESSOP JOHN-FILESMITH-SMITHFIELD JESSOP RICHARD-BRASS INKSTAND MAKER-CARVER STREET JOHNSON SAMUEL-INKPOT MAKER-BAILEY FIELD JOHNSON GEORGE-HAIRDRESSER & PERFUMER-FAR GATE JOHNSON WILLIAM-STAYMAKER-POND LANE JONES ,BUTCHER,& FRITH LINEN & WOOLLENDRAPERS-HIGH STREET JONES DAVID-INNKEEPER-HIGH STREET JUBB JOHN-LINENDRAPER-ANGEL STREET JUSTICE PARIS-VICTUALLER, CUTLER-SPRING STREET KAY SAMUEL-CUTLER-PINSTONE LANE KAY JAMES-INNKEEPER-CHANGE ALLEY KAY JOSEPH-HAIRDRESSER-ANGEL STREET KELK CHARLES-CUTLER-WESTBAR GREEN KEMP ISAIAH N-CUTLER-NORFOLK STREET KENNINGTON JAMES-CUTLER-BLIND LANE KENT RICHARD & SON-CUTLERS-NORFOLK STREET KENT GEORGE-SCISSORSMITH-BARKERS POOL KENT TITUS-SCISSORSMITH-WICKER KENYON,FRITH, &CO-IRON MASTERS-PONDS KENYON JOHN-MERCHANT-HOLLES CROFT KENYON JAMES-SAW MANUFACTURER-ISLE KINDER WIDOW-VICTUALLER-MARKET PLACE KIPPAX JOHN-CUTLER-CHINA SQUARE KIRKBY SAMUEL-GENT-NORFOLK STREET KIRKBY & BORWICK-CUTLERS-LONGSTONE LANE KIRKBY MARY-CUTLER-BRINSWORTS ORCHARD KIRKBY SAMUEL-CUTLER & VICTUALLER-LAMBERT CROFT KIRKBY JOHN-VICTUALLER-SHEFFIELD MOOR KIRKBY JOHN-BUTCHER-COALPIT LANE KIRKBY JAMES-BUTCHER-SHEFFIELD MOOR KITCHEN JOHN-SHOEMAKER-COALPIT LANE KIVETON WILLIAM-FORK MAKER-PINSTONE LANE KNOWLES FRANCIS-SCHOOLMASTER-QUEEN STREET KNUTTON THOMAS-FACTOR-PARADISE SQUARE LAW THOMAS & CO-MANUF.CUTLERS SILVER & PLATED GOODS-NORFOLK STREET LAW JOSEPH-FILESMITH-GIBRALTER LAW PHILIP-EDGETOOL MAKER-CARVER STREET LAW ELEAZER-HOUSE & SIGN PAINTER-SHUDE HILL LAW PETER-VICTUALLER-CHURCH LANE LAW ROBERT-VICTUALLER-WATER LANE LAW CHARLES-VICTUALLER-CASTLE FOLD LEADBEATER JOHN-CUTLER-COPPER STREET LEATHLEY BENJAMIN-IVORY CUTTER-HOLLES CROFT LEE WILLIAM-BOOT & SHOEMAKER-HIGH STREET LEE JOHN-CLERK OF THE PARISH CHURCH-YORK STREET LEVICK JOHN & SON-CUTLERS-POND LANE LEVICK GEORGE-FEN.VIGO BUTTON MAKER-SMITHFIELD LEVICK GEORGE-VIGO BUTTON MAKER-GARDEN WALK LIDDALL THOMAS-BLACKSMITH-NORFOLK STREET LINDLEY WILLIAM & SON-MERCHANTS,MANUF.CUTLERY WARES-POND LANE LINDLEY JOHN-CUTLER-SPRING STREET LINDLEY WILLIAM-FILESMITH-FAR GATE LINDLEY JOHN-MALTSTER-FAR GATE LINDLEY GEORGE-VICTUALLER & SCISSORSMITH-QUEEN STREET LINDLEY JOHN-BELLOWS MAKER-NORFOLK STREET LINDLEY THOMAS-HAIRDRESSER & KEEPER OF CIRCULATING LIBRARY-TOWNHEAD CROSS LINFIT JAMES-FACTOR-ARUNDEL STREET LISTER NATHANIEL-GROCER,& AGENT TO MANCHESTER FIRE OFFICE-HIGH STREET LISTER MISS-BOOKSELLER, MISTRESS OF THE POST OFFICE-MARKET PLACE LISTER SAMUEL-VICTUALLER-WESTBAR LITTLEWOOD & HATFIELD-CUTLERS-PARK LITTLEWOOD JOHN-SILVER CUTLER-SILVER STREET LOCKWOOD ABRAHAM-SCISSORSMITH-LITTLE SHEFFIELD LOFTUS, BRIGHTMORE & CO-HARDWAREMEN,MANUF.SAWS & STEEL-TOWNHEAD CROSS LOGETTE & GRIMAULT-MERCHANTS-SCOTLAND STREET LONGDEN JOHN-VICTUALLER-GREGORY ROW LONGDEN THOMAS-VICTUALLER-HAWLEY CROFT LOVE & SPEAR-FACTORS & STEEL REFINERS-NEW STREET LOVE & DARBY & CO-MANUFACTURERS SILVER & PLATED GOODS-PEA CROFT LOWE JAMES-CARPENTER, JOINER-CARVER STREET LOY WILLIAM & CO CUTLERS, -POND LANE LOY JONATHAN -CUTLER -POND LANE LOY RICHARD -FORK MAKER -BAILEY FIELD LUDLAM WIDOW & SONS CUTLERS -BURGESS STREET LUDLAM GEORGE -VICTUALLER -SCOTLAND STREET LUNN WILLIAM -SURGEON MAN MIDWIFE -FAR GATE M'CAULAY ARCHIBALD -LINENDRAPER- HIGH STREET M'KENZIE REV.ALEXANDER -CURATE PARISH CHURCH, -VICARAGE M'LEOD NORMAND -VIGO BUTTON MKR -HAWLEY CROFT M'NAB REV.ALEXANDER-MINISTER DISSENTING CHAPEL -BACK LN.BAILEY FIELD MACHON GODFREY-GROCER & DEALER FLOUR &C.-PARK MACHON JOSEPH-WHEELWRIGHT -LITTLE SHEFFIELD MACHON JOSEPH-BUTCHER -WESTBAR MACHON WIDOW-VICTUALLER -PEA CROFT MAKIN JAMES-FORK MAKER -WICKER MAKIN JOSEPH-FORK MKR -HOLLES CROFT MALLISON DAVID-GROCER -BULLSTAKE MALTBY JOHN-SCHOOLMASTER -NORFOLK STREET MANGALL & FAULKNER-FACTORS -NORFOLK STREET MANNERS JOSEPH-SAW MAKER -COPPER STREET MAPPIN JONATHAN-CLASP & DOG COLLAR MKR -FAR GATE MAPPIN BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER -COALPIT LANE MAPSON WILLIAM-BUTCHER -BURGESS STREET MARPLES SAMUEL-CUTLER -HOLLES CROFT MARRIOT LUKE-CUTLER -COALPIT LANE MARRIOT-------GROCER -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD MARRIOT JOHN-BAKER -BULLSTAKE MARSDEN WILLIAM-FELLMONGER & GLEW MAKER- MILLSANDS MARH HANNAH-CUTLER -PARK MARSH JOHN-GROCER -HARTSHEAD MARSH JOSEPH-VICTUALLER- SHEFFIELD MOOR MARSHALL SAMUEL-MERCHANT -SNIG HILL MARSHALL JOHN-CONVERTER & REFINER OF STEEL -MILLSANDS MARSHALL WIDOW-CROCER &C. -BARKERS POOL MARSHALLTHOMAS-VICTUALLER- CAMPO LANE MARSHALL CHARLES-SHOEMAKER -BURGESS STREET MARTIN CHARLES-CUTLER -POND LANE MARTIN DAVID-ENGRAVER & COPPER PLATE PRINTER -NORFOLK STREET MATHER WILLIAM-MUSICIAN & DEALER MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS -NORFOLK STREET MATTHEWS WIDOW-SCISSORSMITH -BRICKYARD MATTHEWS JOHN-CUTLER -SMITHFIELD MATTHEWS JAMES-LINENDRAPER -MARKET PLACE MATTHEWMAN JOSEPH-GENT -TOWNHEAD CROSS MAXFIELD THOMAS- EDGE TOOL MAKER -BARKER POOL MEARBECK JOHN-PLUMBER GLAZIER -SNIGHILL MELLOR--------VICTUALLER -CASTLE GREEN MICKLETHWAITE & CO-CUTLERS -POND HILL MICKLETHWAITE JONAS-TAILOR -GRINDLE GATE MIDDLETON MRS.-MILLINER -NORFOLK STREET MIDDLETON WIDOW-VICTUALLER -CHINA SQUARE MIDDLETON JAMES-STAYMAKER -WAIN GATE MIDGLEY THOMAS-CUTLER -DIXON LANE MILLWARD CHARLES-GROCER -WESTBAR GREEN MILNER JOHN- BRAZIER & TINMAN -SNIG HILL MILNER JOSEPH-HAIRDRESSER & CIRCULATING LIBRARY KPR- CHURCH LANE MITCHELL JOSEPH & CO- MANU. SAWS EDGE TOOLS & BUTTONS -SHUDE HILL MOORE BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER -SMITHFIELD MOORE JOSEPH-CURRIER -SNIG HILL MOORHOUSE JOHN-FORK MAKER -PARK MOORHOUSE HENRY-COOPER -BULLSTAKE MORTON WARRIS & CO.-MANU SILVER & PLATED GOODS- BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD MORTON THOMAS-DEALER IN CLOATHS -FARGATE MOSLEY RICHARD-MUSICIAN -PINSTON LANE MOTTERAM RICHARD-HATTER -HARTSHEAD MOZLEY THOMAS-VICTUALLER- PONDS MYCOCK JOHN & JOSEPH CUTLERS BRASS INKSTAND MKRS -BURGESS STREET MYCOCK JOSEPH-CUTLER -CHURCH LANE NADIN WILLIAM-STAYMAKER -HIGH STREET NAYLOR REV. BENJAMIN-MINISTER UPPER CHAPEL NORFOLK ST. -PINSTON LANE NAYLOR & SON-CUTLERS -COALPIT LANE NAYLOR DAVID-VICTUALLER -SILVER STREET NEEDHAM WILLIAM-BASKET MKR & APPRAISER -CAMPO LANE NELSON JOHN-SCISSORSMITH -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD NEWBOULD SAMUEL-EDGE TOOL MKR -SHEFFIELD MOOR NEWBOULD WILLIAM-PLUMBER GLAZIER -YORK STREET NEWMAN THOMAS-SHOEMAKER- HIGH STREET NEWTON EDMUND-CUTLER -BACK LANE NEWTON ANN-CASE MAKER -WESTBAR NEWTON BENJAMIN-BUTCHER -SHUDE HILL NEWTON THOMAS-GROCER -CAMPO LANE NEWTON BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER -BAILEY FIELD NEWTON THOMAS-ROPER -BAILEY FIELD NICHOLSON GEORGE-DEALER IN FLOUR CHEESE BACON -WESTBAR NICHOLSON WILLIAM-SHOEMAKER & LEATHER CUTTER -CHANGE ALLEY NIGHTINGALE JOHN-BUTCHER -HIGH STREET NORCROSS WILLIAM & JOHN-SCISSORSMITH -BARKER POOL NORTH JOSEPH-SURGEON MAN MIDWIFE -SILVER STREET NORTH WILLIAM-CUTLER -LITTLE SHEFFIELD NORTH THOMAS-BUTCHER -BACK LANE NORTHALL JOHN-DEALER IN FLOUR &C.-TRUELOVES GUTTER NOWIL & KIPPAX-CUTLERS & HARDWAREMEN -HIGH STREET NOWIL JOSEPH-CUTLER -COPPER STREET NOWIL J.-DEALER IN FURNITURE & CLOATHS -HIGH STREET OAKS WIDOW-SCISSORSMITH -POND LANE OAKS JAMES-JOBBING SMITH -SPRING STREET OATES JOHN-CUTLER -LITTLE SHEFFIELD OATES CHRISTOPHER-CUTLER -HOLLES CROFT OATES JOHN-SCISSORSMITH -BLIND LANE OATES PAUL VICTUALLER -FAR GATE OATES WILLIAM-TAILOR -MARKET PLACE OLDGATE WILLIAM-VICTUALLER- MILLSANDS OLDHAM JOHN-VICTUALLER -FAR GATE OSBORNE GEORGE-CUTLER -PORTO BELLO OSGUTHORPE JOHN-VICTUALLER -BARKER POOL OSTLIFF SAMUEL-SHOEMAKER -CAMPO LANE OWDELL JOSEPH-GROCER &C.-PINSTON LANE OWEN & GOODINSON-BUTTON MKRS -NORFOLK STREET OWEN ROBERT-CUTLER -WESTBAR GREEN PALFREYMAN ROBERT-HOSIER -SNIG HILL PARKER KENYON-ATTORNEY & MASTER IN CHANCERY -BULLSTAKE PARKER JOHN-ATTORNEY -CHANGE ALLEY PARKER EBENEZER-FACT MANU CUTLERY DLR.BLISTER ****** STEEL -EYRE STREET PARKER SAMUEL-CUTLER -SCOTLAND STREET PARKER THOMAS-CUTLER -BARKER POOL PARKER NICHOLAS-MALTSTER -HIGH STREET PARKER ANN-CUTLER & VIGO BUTTON MKR -PEA CROFT PARKIN JOSEPHUS-CUTLER -CAMPO LANE PARKIN THOMAS-CUTLER -SCOTLAND STREET PARSONS JOHN & CO-MANU SILVER & PLATED GOODS -MARKET PLACE PASS ANN & SON-SCISSORSMITHS -COALPIT LANE PASS JOHN-CUTLER -SHEFFIELD MOOR PASS PAUL-VICTUALLER -CARVER STREET PASS JOHN-BOOK KEEPER TO CLARKE'S AND LEADMAN'S -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD PASMORE & MICKELTHWAITE-HAFT PRESSERS -CARVER STREET PATTEN HANNAH & SON-CUTLERS -SILVER STREET PATTEN GEORGE-CUTLER -COALPIT LANE PEACE JOSEPH-FILESMITH -SCOTLAND STREET PEARCE GEORGE-FILESMITH -PEA CROFT PEARCE GEORGE- BAKER PEA -CROFT PEARCE GEORGE-BAKER & CONFECTIONER -FAR GATE PEARSON WILLIAM-DRUGGIST -HIGH STREET PEARSON THOMAS-GROCER -NORFOLK STREET PEARSON THOMAS-BOOKSELLER STATIONER -ANGEL STREET PEARSON GEORGE-VICTUALLER PARK PEECH SAMUEL-ANGEL INN -ANGEL STREET PENLINGTON THOMAS-WATCHMAKER -HIGH STREET PETERS EDWARD-WATCHMAKER - FAR GATE PINDER SAMUEL-SCISSORSMITH- CHINA SQUARE PLANT BENJAMIN-BELLOWS MKR -LITTLE SHEFFIELD PLANT JOHN-BRICKLAYER -LITTLE SHEFFIELD PLATTS JOHN-WHITESMITH -RATTEN ROW POOLE ROBERT-LINENDRAPER -MARKET PLACE PORTER & NEWTON-GROCERS -KING STREET POTTER WIDOW-VICTUALLER -BARKER POOL POTTS WILLIAM-VICTUALLER -COLSTON CROFT PRESTON REV.MATTHEW-ASSISTANT MINISTER PARISH -CHURCH VICARAGE PRIDDLE LEWIS-ATTORNEY -POND LANE PRIEST JOSEPH-CUTLER -YOUNG STREET PRIEST FRANCIS-CUTLER -PEA CROFT PROCTORS & BIELBY-TELESCOPE MICROSCOPE SPECTACLE ETC MKRS- MILK STREET PROCTOR CHARLES & LUKE-CUTLERS INKSTAND POWDER FLASK MKRS- MILK STREET PROCTOR & CO-MANUF SILVER & PLATED GOODS- HOLLES CROFT PROCTOR JONATHAN-PHLEME MAKER -COALPIT LANE PRYOR MICHAEL-CUTLER -BURGESS STREET PRYOR THOMAS-SCISSORSMITH- GIBRALTER PURDEN WILLIAM-CLERK TO MR.THOMPSON .MERCHNT OF HULL -NORFOLK STREET RACE RICHARD-CUTLER CLEEKHAM -BOWLING GREEN RADFORD REV.THOMAS-CURATE OF THE NEW CHURCH -ARUNDEL STREET RADCLIFFE WILLIAM-DEALER IN FURNITURE & C -PARADISE SQUARE RAGG JOHN-VICTUALLER -CHURCH LANE RAGG GEORGE-SHOEMAKER -RATTEN ROW RAINES ANDREW-SURGEON MAN MIDWIFE -HIGH STREET RAMSAV ROBERT-CARVER & GILDER -BACK LANE RATCLIFF ROBERT-CUTLER -LAMBERT CROFT RATCLIFFE JOHN-SCISSORSMITH -SHEFFIELD MOOR RATCLIFFE ISAAC-SCISSORSMITH -LITTLE SHEFFIELD RATCLIFFE WIDOW-CUTLER -PARADISE SQUARE RAWSON & CO-WHOLSALE BREWERS -POND LANE RAWSON JAMES-DRUGGIST -SNIG HILL RAWSON ROBERT-BAKER -SNIG HILL READ JOHN-SILVER REFINER -GREEN LANE REDFEARN MARY-SCISSORSMITH -SIMS CROFT RENISHAW THOMAS-BUTTON MAKER -PORTO BELLO REVEL GEORGE-CUTLER -RATTEN ROW REVEL JOSEPH-CUTLER -PEA CROFT REVEL BENJAMIN-CUTLER -PEA CROFT RHODES JONATHAN-PLAISTERER -CHURCH LANE RICHARDSON JOHN-SCHOOLMASTER -PARADISE SQUARE RICHARDSON JAMES-VICTUALLER- HIGH STREET RICHARDSON WESTON-STAYMAKER -PARADISE SQUARE RIDGARD EZRA-BOOKSELLER & STATIONER -HIGH STREET RIMINGTON JOHN- ATTORNEY -ANGEL STREET RIMINGTON THOMAS- LINENDRAPER -MARKET PLACE ROBERTS, CADMAN & CO-MANUF SILVER & PLATED GOODS- EYRE STREET ROBERTS,EYRE,BEKLON,& CO MANUF SILVER& PLATED GOODS- UNION STREET ROBERTS JACOB & SAMUEL-CUTLERS -UNION STREET ROBINSON JOHN & WILLIAM- CHAIR MAKERS -NEW STREET ROBINSON SAMUEL-AGENT TO SUN FIRE OFFICE -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD ROBINSON ANTHONY-USHER OF FREE GRAMMAR SCHOOL -CAMPO LANE ROBERTS JOSEPH & CO CUTLERS -GARDEN STREET ROBERTS JOHN -CUTLER -PINSTON LANE ROBERTS JONATHAN-VICTUALLER -PEA CROFT ROBERTS ELKANA- BAKER -COALPIT LANE RODGERS MAURICE & JOSEPH-CUTLERS -NORFOLK STREET RODGERS PAUL-LINENDRAPER -MARKET PLACE RODGERS THOMAS- TANNER -SHUDE HILL ROEBUCK B. ROEBUCK B. JUNIOR & FENTON- MERCHANTS -CHURCH LANE ROEBUCK & CO-CUTLERS -LAMBERT CROFT ROEBUCK THOMAS-COLLAR MAKER -BULL STAKE ROEBUCK ROBERT-VICTUALLER- PEA CROFT ROEBUCK GEORGE- SHOEMAKER- FAR GATE ROGERS JOHN-VICTUALLER -WESTBAR GREEN ROGERSON THOMAS-SHOEMAKER & GROCER -SILVER STREET ROLLISTON DOLLIFF-MANUF SILVER &PLATED GOODS- MARKET PLACE & SPRING STREET RONKSLEY JAMES-VICTUALLER -WESTBAR ROFE JOHN-MALTSTER -HOLLES CROFT ROFE JOHN-VICTUALLER -CHURCH LANE ROFE WILLIAM-PLUMBER & GLAZIER -HIGH STREET ROFE WILLIAM-CUTLER -COALPIT LANE ROWBOTTOM SARAH-CAP & FERRULE MAKER -NORFOLK STREET ROWBOTTOM JOHN-GROCER & CHANDLER- SIMS CROFT ROWLAND WIDOW-CUTLER -BACK LANE ROWLAND THOMAS-GROCER -FAR GATE ROWLEY BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER -FAR GATE RUTHERFORD JOHN-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE -HIGH STREET RUTHERFORD WILLIAM-SHEATHER -HOLLES CROFT RYALS WILLIAM-CARPENTER & JOINER -WORKHOUSE CROFT SADLER TOBIAS-SCISSORSMITH- BARKER POOL SALT JOHN-CUTLER -HOLLES CROFT SALT JOSEPH-HATTER -GREGORY ROW SALTHOUSE JOSEPH-JEWELLER & SILVERSMITH -MARKET PLACE SAMBOURN THOMAS- ATTORNEY- PARADISE SQUARE SANDERSON CHARLES-TAILOR- CHANGE ALLEY SAUER,EYRE & CO-MERCHANTS -UNION STREET SCHOLEY JOHN-BUTCHER -SILVER STREET SCHOLFIELD JOHN- SCHOOLMASTER -NORFOLK STREET SCOTT SAMUEL-VICTUALLER -GIBRALTER SCOTT JOHN-BRAZIER & TINMAN -ANGEL STREET SENYER AARON-SCHOOLMASTER -BURGESS STREET SERGEANT JOSEPH-VICTUALLER -WATER LANE SETTLE THOMAS & CO-CUTLERS -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD SHARP ALEXANDER-PLUMBER,GLAZIER,SILVERER LOOKING GLASSES -HOWARD STREET SHAW MICHAEL-CLASP & COLLAR MAKER -WESTBAR GREEN SHAW JOHN-GARDENER & VICTUALLER -SPRING STREET SHELDON JOHN-VICTUALLER -PINSTON LANE SHEPHERD EDWARD-FACTOR MANUF CUTLERY WARES -FAR GATE SHEPHERD ROBERT-CUTLER -NORFOLK STREET SHEPHERD JOHN-CUTLER & VICTUALLER -HOLLES CROFT SHEPHERD JOHN-DEALER HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE & HARDWARE- BULLSTAKE SHEPLEY SAMUEL-BUTCHER & VICTUALLER -MARKET PLACE SHERWIN JOHN-WHITESMITH -WESTBAR SHIPLEY SETH-BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD SHIPMAN AENEAS-CUTLER -SILVER STREET SHIRES STEPHEN-TOBACCONIST -CHANGE ALLEY SHIRT BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER -CASTLE GREEN SHIRT SAMUEL-VICTUALLER -SILVER STREET SHORE JOHN & WILLIAM-BANKERS- IRISH CROSS SIDDALL MATTHEW-SHEARSMITH -BROAD LANE SIDDALL WILLIAM-SCHOOLMASTER -PEA CROFT SIDDALL JOHN-VICTUALLER- HIGH STREET SIMPSON JOHN-WHEELWRIGHT -NORFOLK STREET SKIDMORE SIMON-SHEARSMITH- BACK LANE SKIDMORE ROBERT-SCISSORSMITH -NEW STREET SLATER JOHN-GROCER -SIMS CROFT SLEIGH--COCK WEAPONS MAKER -POND LANE SMITH JOHN- GENT -WESTBAR SMITH NATHANIEL & CO-SILVER CUTLERS MANUF SILVER PLATED GOODS -WAIN GATE SMITH STACEY & CO-FOUNDERS QUEENS FOUNDRY -PARADISE SQUARE SMITH WILLIAM & CO-CUTLERS -COALPIT LANE SMITH WIDOW-CUTLER -BROAD LANE SMITH SAMUEL-CUTLER -SCOTLAND STREET SMITH THOMAS-CUTLER -SCOTLAND STREET SMITH JOHN-CUTLER -GRINDLE GATE SMITH WILLIAM-SCISSORSMITH -HAWLEY CROFT SMITH HENRY-FILESMITH -SCOTLAND STREET SMITH JOHN-SCISSORSMITH- SIMS CROFT SMITH JOHN-BOOKSELLER & BINDER -ANGEL STREET SMITH STEVEN-GROCER TOP OF -SILVER STREET SMITH JAMES-GROCER- NORFOLK STREET SMITH GEORGE-GROCER -WESTBAR GREEN SMITH JAMES-GLASS & CHINAMAN -FAR GATE SMITH GEORGE-VICTUALLER -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD SMITH WILLIAM-BUTCHER -SPRING STREET SMITH THOMAS SHOEMAKER -SNIG HILL SMITH LUKE-TAILOR & GROCER -SIMS CROFT SMITH JAMES-TAILOR & DEALER IN CLOATHS -HARTSHEAD SNIDALL JAMES-WATCHMAKER & DEALER IN HARDWARE- KING STREET SORSBY THOMAS-VICTUALLER -CAMPO LANE SOUTH WIDOW-SCISSORSMITH -BURGESS STREET SOUTHERN THOMAS-COOPER -CAMPO LANE SOWTER WINTINGTON-VICTUALLER -CAMPO LANE SOWTER ISAAC-WOOLCOMBER- WESTBAR GREEN SPENCER WIDOW-CUTLER -WESTBAR GREEN SPENCER MATTHIAS-FILESMITH BOTTOM OF -SCOTLAND STREET SPENCER MATTHIAS-FILESMITH -PEA CROFT SPURR PETER-CUTLER -CHURCH LANE STACEY WIDOW-VICTUALLER -WATER LANE STACEY JOHN-CARPENTER & JOINER -HIGH STREET STANFIELD JOHN-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE- HIGH STREET STANIFORTH, PARKIN & CO-MERCHANTS MANUF CUTLERY WARES- ARUNDEL STREET STANIFORTH & HOYSTROP-WHOLSALE RETAIL DLRS WINES SPIRITS -MULBERRY STREET STANIFORTH SAMUEL & SON-LINENDRAPERS -TRUELOVES GUTTER STANIFORTH WILLIAM-SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE -TRUELOVES GUTTER STANIFORTH WILLIAM-GROCER -PARK STANIFORTH GEORGE-SHEATHER -LAMBERT CROFT STANIFORTH WILLIAM-VICTUALLER -LAMBERT CROFT STANILAND JOHN-CUTLER -BROAD LANE STANILAND RICHARD-CUTLER -BURGESS STREET STANILAND JOSEPH-OVERSEER OF WORKHOUSE- WESTBAR STANLEY SAMUEL-CUTLER -SCOTLAND STREET STEAD RICHARD-CUTLER- SILVER STREET STEAD HOPE- BUTCHER -MEADOW STREET STEEL EDWARD-VICTUALLER -FAR GATE STENSON SAMUEL-PATTEN & CLOG MAKER -HARTSHEAD STERNDALE BENJAMIN-VICTUALLER -FAR GATE STEUART THOMAS- M.D. -PARADISE SQUARE STEVENS ANTIPAS-GROCER -BROAD LANE END STEVENSON WILLIAM-WHITESMITH -BURGESS STREET STEVENSON JOHN-HAMMER MAKER -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD STEWART JOHN-PLAISTERER -WHITE CROFT STOCKS WILLIAM-INNKEEPER -ANGEL STREET STAFFORD & NEWTON-MANUF SILVER & PLATED GOODS -ARUNDEL STREET STAFFORD JOHN-APPRAISER -BROAD LANE STRINGER JOSEPH-SCISSORSMITH -BURGESS STREET STURGESS JOHN-PORTER MERCHANT -UNION STREET STYRING THOMAS-BREECHES MAKER -BULL STAKE SUATT WIDOW-VICTUALLER -SPRING STREET SUTCLIFFE, SPORLE & CO-SILVER CUTLERS-KING STREET SUTCLIFFE ABRAHAM- M.D. -PARADISE SQUARE SUTTON JONATHAN-CUTLER -MEADOW STREET SWALLOW JOSEPH-CUTLER -SMITHFIELD SWANN JOSEPH-CUTLER -GIBRALTER SWANN ROBERT-CHEESE FACTOR- BULL STAKE SWIFT JOSEPH-MALTSTER -COALPIT LANE SWIFT EDMUND-MALTSTER -BRIDGE FOOT SWIFT THOMAS-SCISSORSMITH -SMITHFIELD SYKES SAMUEL-CUTLER HOLLES CROFT SWINDEN MATTHEW-CUTLER & VICTUALLER -HOLLES CROFT SWINDELL WILLIAM-BUTCHER -PEA CROFT SYKES & CO-SILVER CUTLERS -PINSTON LANE SYKES THOMAS-DEALER IN FLOUR & ETC -WESTBAR SYKES JOHN-BAKER -NORFOLK STREET SYKES ROBERT-GUNSMITH -WAIN GATE TARBOTTOM THOMAS-CUTLER & VICTUALLER -SCOTLAND STREET TATE THOMAS--HOUSE & SIGN PAINTER-CHANGE ALLEY TAYLOR GEORGE-HOSIER & ETC -SNIG HILL TAYLOR PAUL-VICTUALLER & CUTLER -POND LANE TAYLOR JOSEPH-VICTUALLER & MUSICIAN TOP OF- SIVER STREET TAYLOR THOMAS-BREECHES MAKER -FAR GATE TAYLOR SAMUEL-CUTLER -PEA CROFT TEAL WILLIAM-CUTLER -SHUDE HILL TEASDALE THOMAS-VICTUALLER -ARUNDEL STREET TEASDALE MARGARET-VICTUALLER -COALPIT LANE THOMPSON BENJAMIN BLADES-IRON & TIMBER MERCHANT -NORFOLK STREET THOMPSON JOHN & WILLIAM-CASE MAKERS -WESTBAR THOMPSON JOHN-LINENDRAPER -HIGH STREET THOMPSON MATTHEW-TAILOR -WESTBAR GREEN THORNDELL GEORGE-POULTERER & COOK -HARTSHEAD THORPE WIDOW-VICTUALLER -HIGH STREET TIBBIT JOHN-DEALER IN FLOUR & ETC -LAMBERT CROFT TILLOTSON THOMAS-CUTLER -COALPIT LANE TIMM JOHN-CUTLER -BACK LANE TIMM NICHOLAS-SCISSORSMITH -FAR GATE TIMM JOHN-BAKER -FAR GATE TONGUE HALL-BUTCHER BOTTOM OF- WHITE CROFT TOOTHILL JOHN-DEALER IN FL0UR & ETC -FAR GATE TOPHAM WILLIAM-SADDLER -TRUELOVES GUTTER TOWLER WILLIAM-VICTUALLER- HOLLES CROFT TOWNROW,BURDEKIN & TINGLE-REFINERS -TOWNHEAD CROSS TOWNROW MATTHEW-IVORY & WOOD CUTTER -HOLLES CROFT TOWNSEND GEORGE-STEWARD TO DUKE OF NORFOLK, -FARM TOWNSEND JAMES-CUTLER -HOLLES CROFT TRAVIS NATHANIEL-CUTLER -WHITE CROFT TRICKET,HASLEHURST,WHITLEY & PRYOR-SILVER CUTLERS SCISSRSMTHS -HILL FOOT TRICKET ENOCH & JAMES-FILESMITHS -COALPIT LANE TRICKET WILLIAM & THOMAS-CUTLERS -ARUNDEL STREET TRICKET JONATHAN-BAKER -PARK TRIPPET JOHN-IRONMONGER & GROCER -HIGH STREET TRIPPET HENRY-CARPENTER & JOINER -SPRING STREET TRUELOVE WILLIAM-WHITESMITH -HIGH STREET TUDOR, LEADERS & NICHOLSON-MANUF SILVER & PLATED GOODS -SYCAMORE HILL TURNER JOHN-MERCHANT -HARTSHEAD TURNER SAMUEL-CUTLER -CHINA SQUARE TURNER SAMUEL-MERCER & DRAPER -ANGEL STREET TURNER NICHOLAS-FILESMITH -LAMBERT CROFT TURNER ROBERT-HOSIER,HATTER & LEATHER SELLER -ANGEL STREET TURNER WIDOW-VICTUALLER -CHURCH LANE TURNER JOHN-VICTUALLER -SHEFFIELD MOOR TURNER JAMES-HAIRDRESSER -CAMPO LANE TWIGG JONATHAN-CUTLER -BROAD LANE END TWIGG WILLIAM-SCISSORSMITH -WICKER TWIGG THOMAS-PLUMBER & GLAZIER -WAIN GATE TWYBILL ANN-DEALER IN TOYS & HARDWARE -ANGEL STREET TYAS AARON-VICTUALLERBOTTOM OF -WHITE CROFT UMBERSTONE THOMAS-ORGANIST -NORFOLK STREET UNWIN, MIRFITT & RHODES-COOPERS -SNIG HILL UNWIN JOSEPH & ROBERT-CARPENTERS & JOINERS -EYRE STREET UNWIN JOHN-SCISSORSMITH -BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD VAUCE ALEXANDER-VICTUALLER -WESTBAR GREEN VAUGHAN THOMAS-VIGO BUTTON MAKER -SMITHFIELD VICKERS JAMES-WHITE METAL MANUFACTORY -GARDEN WALK VICKERS BENJAMIN-SCISSORSMITH -SPRING STREET VICKERS WILLIAM-SCISSORSMITH- SIMS CROFT VICKERS JOHN-MILLER -MILLSANDS WADE ROBERT-MALTSTER & CORNFACTOR -CHURCH LANE WADSWORTH WIDOW-VICTUALLER -SHUDE HILL WAINWRIGHT JOHN-VICTUALLER -BAILEY FIELD WAINWRIGHT JOHN-BUTCHER -CAMPO LANE WAINWRIGHT SARAH- DEALER IN FLOUR & ETC -PEA CROFT WAITE JOHN- GENT CASTLE -GREEN HEAD WALKER JOHN & CO-STEEL -REFINERS WICKER WALKER JAMES-CONFECTIONER & BAKER -HIGH STREET WALKER JAMES-HAIRDRESSER & PERFUMIER -TRUELOVES GUTTER WALKER WILLIAM-VICTUALLER -SCOTLAND STREET WALKER ROBERT-BAKER -FAR GATE WALTON RICHARD-CUTLER -WHITE CROFT WALTON WILLIAM-DEALER IN FLOUR & ETC -HAWLEY CROFT WARBURTON SAMUEL-CUTLER -HOLLES CROFT WARBURTON THOMAS-CUTLER -COALPIT LANE WARD WILLIAM-PRINTER & BOOKSELLER -KING STREET WARD WIDOW-SCISSORSMITH & VICTUALLER- BURGESS STREET WARD THOMAS-JOINER & CABINET MAKER -QUEEN STREET WATER GODFREY & SON CUTLERS -POND LANE WATERHOUSE ROBERT-BAKER & CONFECTIONER -WESTBAR WATERHOUSE JEREMIAH-CUTLER -SCOTLAND STREET WATKINSON JONATHAN-CUTLER -SILVER STREET WATSON JAMES-TONTINE INN -BULLSTAKE WEBB C.H. SURGEON & MAN MIDWIFE -CHANGE ALLEY WEBSTER JOHN-VIGO BUTTON MAKER -PINSTONE LANE WEBSTER EDWARD-STAYMAKER -CHANGE ALLEY WEBSTER JOSEPH-CUTLER -HARTSHEAD WELDON WILLIAM-EDGE TOOL MAKER -COLTON CROFT WELDON WILLIAM-CARPENTER & JOINER -BAILEY FIELD WELLS, HEATHFIELD & CO-PROPRIETORS OF THE -COTTON MILL WELLS JOHN-MALTSTER -CASTLE FOLD WEST JONATHAN-GROCER -SNIG HILL WHARTON CHARLES- PLAISTERER -BURGESS STREET WHEAT JAMES-ATTORNEY -PARADISE SQUARE WHITAKER THOMAS-VICTUALLER -TRUELOVES GUTTER WHITE SAMUEL-FILESMITH -BAILEY FIELD WHITE STEPHEN-VICTUALLER -GIBRALTER WHITEHEAD JOHN-VICTUALLER -SCOTLAND STREET WHITELEY JAMES-SCISSORSMITH -GIBRALTER WHITELOCK JOHN-BAKER -WESTBAR WHITHAM JAMES-MILLER & MALTSTER -MARKET PLACE WHITHAM JON.-WATCHMAKER & HARDWAREMAN -MARKET PLACE WHITHAM MRS.-MILLINER -MARKET PLACE WIGFALL PETER-GENT-COLTON CROFT WIGFALL WILLIAM-CUTLER-PEA CROFT WILCOCKSON JOHN-HOSIER & GLOVER-HIGH STREET WILCOCKSON EDWARD-HOSIER & GLOVER-BULLSTAKE WILDE JOHN-SAW & EDGETOOL MAKER-CHURCH LANE WILD THOMAS-PORTER MERCHANT-ANGEL STREET WILD MRS.-MILLINER-ANGEL STREET WILD JOHN-CUTLER-HOLLES CROFT WILD WILLIAM-CUTLER-TRINITY STREET WILD JOHN-VICTUALLER-RATTEN ROW WILD JONATHAN-CUTLER & VICTUALLER-SIMS CROFT WILDSMITH JOSEPH-CARPET MANUFACTURER & ETC -CHANGE ALLEY WILEY WILLIAM-LINENDRAPER-MARKET PLACE WILKIN THOMAS-CARPENTER & JOINER-CARVER STREET WILKINSON GEORGE & SON-CARPENTERS & JOINERS-GIBRALTER WILKINSON THOMAS-CUTLER-BLIND LANE WILKINSON WILLIAM-SHOEMAKER-TRUELOVES GUTTER WILKINSON JONATHAN-COLLECTOR OF RATES-WORKHOUSE CROFT WILKINSON JOHN-CUTLER-LAMBERT CROFT WILSON &VAVAFOUR-DISTILLERS & BRANDY MERCHANTS-POND LANE WILSON JOSEPH-CUTLER-CARVER STREET WILSON DAVID-VICTUALLER-TOP OF SILVER STREET WILSON WILLIAM-VICTUALLER-PEA CROFT WILSON JOHN-CUTLER-BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD WILSON JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-SHUDE HILL WILSON JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-SHUDE HILL WILSON RICHARD-PAWNBROKER-PARADISE SQUARE WILSON SAMUEL-CUTLER-EYRE STREET WILSON JOSEPH-OPTICIAN-NORFOLK STREET WINDLE EDMUND-CUTLER-LAMBERT CROFT WING WIDOW-VICTUALLER-BOTTOM OF HAWLEY CROFT WINGFIELD JOHN-GENT-HOLLES CROFT WINGFIELD SAMUEL-BUTCHER-BAILEY FIELD WINTER JOHN-GENT-CHURCHYARD WITHERS BENJAMIN & CO-FACTORS & MANUF OF CUTLERY WARES-FAR GATE WOOD GEORGE-SCISSORSMITH-PEA CROFT WOOD BENJAMIN-BUTTON MAKER-LAMBERT CROFT WOOD JOHN-BLACKSMITH-JEHU LANE WOODCOCK & BIRKET-BRUSH MAKERS-CHANGE ALLEY WOODCROFT & BIRKS-BUTTON MAKERS-PONDS WOODDALL WIDOW-VICTUALLER-SPRING STREET WOODWARD MATTHEW-GLAZIER-BULLSTAKE WOOLHOUSE GEORGE-GROCER-BULLSTAKE WOOLHOUSE JOSEPH-CUTLER-LAMBERT CROFT WOOLLEN ROBERT-BAKER-PARADISE SQUARE WOSTENHOLME T.-CARPENTER & JOINER-LONGSTONE LANE WORTLEY JOHN-SCISSORSMITH-GIBRALTER WREAKS MARMADUKE-HAIRDRESSER & TOYMAN-HIGH STREET WROE JOSEPH-VICTUALLER-BRINSWORTHS ORCHARD WRIGHT WILLIAM,JOHN & ROBERT-CUTLERS-SMITHFIELD WRIGHT RICHARD-SADDLER-TRUELOVES GUTTER WRIGHT THOMAS-VICTUALLER-BULLSTAKE WRIGHT JOSHUA-WHITESMITH-WESTBAR GREEN WRIGHT THOMAS-WHITESMITH-GREGORY ROW END 8/7/05
  3. Guest

    Polly Bettaneys

    SteveHB Did you live in the village ? if so you must remember there was also a breadshop at the bottom of Coal Pit lane opposite Birchenoughs farm. It was painted a red colour. The Gennel which ran down the side of the bread shop also had a host of cottages, most of them hidden fro few on the left going down towards Rural Lane (Fox Lane), If my memory is correct I believe the Fearn Family lived in at least one of the cottages. If You remember Polly Bettaneys you must remember this as well,
  4. Guest

    Reuben Hallam

    I remember the row of stone cottages that used to ajoin the Star. I lived just off Luke Lane on what was called "Coal Pit Lane, this was later changed to Aldene Road. The reason behind this was someone who lived on Coal Pit lane had tried to book a holiday somewhere, but when they gave their adddress, they were refused, because it was assumed that they were miners and too common. I was told as a youngster that they campaigned to get the name of the Road changed, so the same thing wouldn't happen again. I gew up in Wadsley when it was a village, it was full of stone cottages, and little shops. Coal Pit Lane/ Aldene Road leads up to Wadsley common where we used to play for hours, only returning home when we were hungry or it started to get dark. Happy memories.
  5. A DESCRIPTION OF THE TOWN OF SHEFFIELD in my remembrance wrote in the year 1832 at the time the Cholera was raging in Sheffield. BY JOSEPH WOOLHOUSE. FORE WORD BY MR. HENRY RICHARDSON. The year 1832, when Joseph Woolhouse wrote his interesting paper on "Old Sheffield as I knew it," was a year of great importance. It saw the commencement of the Dispensary (now the Royal Hospital), the destruction of the old Cutlers' Hall, and the erection of the present building in Church Street, the first election of Parliamentary representation for the town, the enfranchisement of three thousand five hundred voters, and the visitation of "the Cholera," which played great havoc in the town. Whilst Woolhouse was writing in his spare moments, as timekeeper at Sheaf Works, the hundreds of pages in manuscript, which I possess, he took great pains to closely watch the developments of the town. It was early in the year 1832 when a proposal was made at the Meeting of Governors connected with the General Infirmary (now Royal Infirmary) to establish for the use of the town a Dispensary connected with the institution. The proposal was negatived by a large majority, the minority, under the leadership of several prominent medical men, including Dr. Arnold Knight, immediately called a meeting and decided to step forward in the dispensing of medicines for the poor and needy. At the meeting called by the minority it was decided to go forward with the movement, when Rules were adopted, and Dr. C. F. Favell, M.D., was elected Hon. Sec., premises were acquired in Tudor Place, and this useful work proceeded. Simultaneously with the opening of the Dispensary the town was visited with an outbreak of the Asiatic Cholera, not unexpected, as many writers have asserted. Preparations were already in hand, it having already appeared in other parts of the country. In the November previous a communication on this subject, from Dr. G. Calvert Holland, who had journeyed to Sunderland to investigate this awful disease, then raging in the country, had recently been elected Physician to the Infirmary. The Board of Health was formed to deal with the epidemic, on which Board James Montgomery was a distinct figure. It also included other prominent public men, including John Blake, Master Cutler, who fell a victim to the disease. The medical faculty was fully represented. A full and complete history of the epidemic is to be found in Dr. John Stokes' "History of the Cholera Epidemic," published in 1921, and is in the Reference Department of our Free Library. "Woolhouse" also mentions cases in which he refers "to the extreme careful skill of the medical profession." During the time "Woolhouse" was writing his interesting memoirs, the contractors were pulling down the old Cutlers' Hall, and in June, 1832, the corner stone of the new Cutlers' Hall was laid by John Blake, a filemaker of Upperthorpe, who died of Cholera, and was interred at Clay Wood. Underneath the corner stone of the Cutlers' Hall was placed a number of coins, specimens of cutlery, newspaper records, &c. "Woolhouse" in Gleanings, Vol. III, page 60, refers to the illuminating of St. Paul's Church Clock and the consternation it created. Of the local conditions we are assured of the liberality of the overseers, who "announce that the allowance made to landlords paying poor rates on cottage property, shall be reduced from 50°/0 to 33~, trade being very depressed, with little prospect of improvement, the poor rate costing 83;,~ per week as against 41;~ per week in 1831." The Debtors Gaol in Scotland Street was kept busy, whilst Little Sheffield Gaol (Ecclesall) was so full that personal execution was stayed. The Government of the town was represented by a selected body known as the Police Commissioners, under an Act passed in 1818. Close upon 100 persons formed this body politic, who elected a Treasurer, a Clerk, a Surveyor, a Collector, 50 watchmen and other officers, and were restricted to spend not more than 113 in the ~. The annual rentals in 1832 amounted to .,£5,073 7s. 6d.; and in that year they appointed " street keepers. " The Post Office was in Norfolk Street. in the shop at the corner of Arundel Street. Mr. Wreaks was Postmaster, and the postal work of the town was carried out by five letter carriers. The coaches went to and fro from the Tontine, King's Head, Angel, Commercial Hotels, whilst the carriers were mostly from stores and warehouses in Arundel Street. At this period in the valleys were forty Grinding Wheels (water), sixteen in Rivelin Valley, eight on the Loxley, and the remainder on the Rivers Don, Sheaf and Porter. It is now twenty years since I acquired a series of manuscripts written by Joseph Woolhouse between the years 1821 and 1842. They are in five sections, written upon foolscap paper and enclosed within wrappers or coverings of brown paper. A distant relative of the author informed me that they were written when Woolhouse was in reduced circumstances and that he lent them for a small charge to those interested, or read them aloud in various public houses in the town. Their thumbmarked condition is evidence of frequent use. Since the late Mr. R. E. Leader wrote the notes upon Woolhouse's "description" I have traced the following information concerning him. Woolhouse was born in 1778 and was the son of Joseph Woolhouse, cutler, to whom he was apprenticed. He obtained his freedom as a cutler in 1804, and in 1821, when living at 2 Newhall Street, was described as a Table Knife Cutler. About 1833 he found employment as timekeeper at Sheaf Works, and in his various writings he mentions certain events concerning these works. His connection with Sheaf Works has been traced to 1849, when he was 71 years of age, but no later information about him has been found. Woolhouse was present at the opening of the Cutlers' Hall in 1833, and also at the dinner given by the Master Cutler to the Freemen of the Company in celebration of that event. He left an interesting account of these gatherings in which he says that the Freemen were received by the Master and Mistress Cutler and on entering the Hall were regaled with "a bun and a glass of ale." At the dinner, he states, the Master Cutler had the oldest Freeman of the Company seated on his right. This was George Beardshaw of Wincobank, a relative of Woolhouse's, who was 93 years of age and who was brought to the dinner in the carriage of Mr. Thomas Dunn, the ex-Master Cutler. Amongst the toasts at the dinner he records the following: "May Yorkshire wives be like Sheffield knives, highly polished and well tempered," and "Eternal destruction to false marks on all Sheffield made goods." Apart from the "description" printed above this "true old Sheffield Blade" left many interesting jottings upon the old town. Amongst these is a list of the "wells" which supplied the populace with water, and a description of Sheffield streets and alleys in 1732, gleaned from various sources. Mr. Leader's annotations have added very materially to the value of Woolhouse's "description." In his last letter to me Mr. Leader asked what had been done with the MS., and when it would be published; my great regret is that it was not possible to issue it during Mr. Leader's lifetime. The fact that it is now printed in the Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society, would, I am sure, have afforded pleasure to Mr. Leader, for he took an intense interest in all the Society's work. In conclusion may I place on record my thanks for the valuable help Mr. Leader always gave to me in my researches into the history of "Old Sheffield." His help was given unsparingly, and not to me alone, but to all those who delved into the past of our old town. In offering and publishing this interesting brochure, I am urged to do so by many friends who, having read its publication in the Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society, suggested its publicity in book form and at a reasonable price, that the artisans of this important city may glean something of the city in its early days. The reader may note that "Woolhouse" in his Description deals with the streets and with buildings he remembers; with the industrial conditions of the period he says little, still he gives a vivid impression of the streets and walks that existed in our great-grandfathers days. It is my intention shortly to publish the list of wells which supplied the town with water, and his quaint statements concerning them. The paper was written when horse-less buses were unknown, when cabs were used, and which have since disappeared; when "hansom cabs," with the perched driver at the rear, with the "enquiry hole at the top" were unknown, and have since gone into oblivion. In the eighteenth century the "Sedan chair" was popular, and rows of them stood for hire in Norfolk Street, when the ladies of Sheffield held their Assemblies in the old building still existing. Much more may ~be written in this strain, but the progress and advancement of this city during my lifetime has been remarkable, and I dedicate this humble reproduction to one of Sheffield's leading citizens, who, having watched the progress and given untold ability to this advancement, I commend as an example to future generations. Fulwood, 1926. A DESCRIPTION OF THE TOWN OF SHEFFIELD in my remembrance wrote in the year 1832 at the time the Cholera was raging in Sheffield. BY JOSEPH WOOLHOUSE. PREPATORY NOTE. Firsthand recollections of the former state of Sheffield which go back to the eighteenth century, are so rare that it may be reckoned a piece of good fortune that the following description "wrote in the year 1832" has come into the hands of Mr. Henry Richardson, the Treasurer of the Hunter Archaeological Society. In 1798 Joseph Hunter, then a boy of 15, began a series of "Perambulations" but he did not carry them far at least, as printed, they are only a fragment. Besides these, there have been published from time to time in the newspapers, the memories of venerable citizens, and these, up to the date of that book, have been embodied by me in Reminiscences of Old Sheffield. But few of them reached back, in actual personal knowledge, beyond the earlier years of the nineteenth century. And the value of the present jottings lies more in telling what the writer had himself actually seen, than in what reached him through hearsay. Reference to various authorities shows him to be singularly accurate as to the former. As regards the latter well, he reflects inbred popular myths. He confirms much already on record, and adds new items. There is not much known about him. His age when he wrote has not been ascertained, but there is internal evidence that points to about 1775 as the time of his birth. Thus he faintly remembered the old barns removed to build the Tontine Inn some time before it was opened in 1785, and he had been in the wooden Shambles replaced about the same time. He was a school-boy when Church Street was widened in 1785, and as a young man he served in the Sheffield Independent Volunteers during six of its eight years existence 1794 to 1802. He saw the fire at the Cotton Mill in 1792. So that he would be somewhere near fifty-seven years of age in 1832. That he had a true Sheffielder's affection for the town is evident, and that he had historic instincts is shown by the fact, of which Mr. Richardson informs me, that he left behind him the Manuscript. of "The History of Sheffield in the County of York, " in six parts, written between the years 1826-1842. This he was accustomed to lend out to readers, for a small payment. But judging from the first part, which alone I have seen, it has none of the personal interests of the "Description," being almost entirely copied from well-known publications. I have had some difficulty in restraining a pen trained in journalistic traditions, from interference with many sentences which might have been more clearly expressed. But in the main, and with some amendments of punctuation, it has seemed better to retain quaint language reflecting the manner in which those of the author's class would talk. That is to say, would talk on Sundays, not in the workshop, for while it is charged with Sheffield phrases, there is, unfortunately, a scarcity of dialectic words. Occasionally we get these as in the story of the lame man who was "frighted by the barghast," and whose escape was hindered because his wife had "the door made. " It will be noted, too, that people took "kits" and "flaskets" to the wells, for water. The constant use of "was" where grammar requires "were ", is, of course, characteristic of a period when people were accustomed to say "you was, " but the epithet "elegant" has an American flavour. It is rather surprising to find an old Sheffielder speaking, Yankee fashion, of "a very elegant bowling green"; "an elegant country house"; "a very elegant town pump," and so forth. I trust that my annotation may serve to remove certain obscurities and enable the reader to sift fiction from fact. R. E. LEADER. (Richard A. Brant note : Leaders comments are those which follow the number in round brackets) BEGINNING WITH THE OLD CHURCH YARD TAKING THE PARISH CHURCH FOR MY GUIDE. From the Church to Shales Moor coming from the Church, the first place of note was the old Town Hall, built in the year 1700. It stood at the South East Corner of the Church Yard. It was built of Stone for the use of the Town. The Sessions was held here, and the Magistrates used to do all their business in it. There was Steps went up on each Side the door on the North Side into the Hall, also a flight of Steps facing up Church Lane for the Magistrates and other Officers to go into the Hall. The prisons was underneath the Hall. The door was on the South Side and faced nearly up Fargate, so that when any person was Confined you had an opportunity of seeing them. I have peeped many a time when a boy thro' the small round hole to see persons whom perhaps I knew. Their friends had an opportunity of giving them Vituals, but people often gave them Liquors. I have heard many a drunken prisoner bawl there. There was 3 Prisons, 2 for men and 1 for women. There was a dwelling over the woman's prison; someone lived there to keep the hall clean etc. The Stocks was in front of the Building, facing down High Street. Lionel Smilter the Town Crier, lived in a dwelling under the Hall. There was some large Gates at the East Corner of the Hall and went in a slanting direction across to the corner of the house once occupied by Mr. Watkin [Walker] Confectioner. The Church yard was enclosed by a low Stone wall only on the North and South sides. There was a few old houses on the West side, built with no regularity. The road to the Church was on the South, fronting Cutlers' Hall and [the other, already mentioned] South East by the Town Hall. On the North Side, from the top of Paradise square was up a flight of perhaps 12 or 14 Steps out of Campo Lane opposite that Grocer's Shop, it was a Grocer's shop at that time. These steps had a rail in the middle. There was only one door on the North Side the Church, the same as now. These steps used to lead direct to that door, no St. James Street nor St. James Church. St. James Row and the East Parade is took from part of the Church yard. {1} Where the News Rooms are, used to be some very old buildings belonging to the Church where they once cast a Set of Bells for the Church. All mason work belonging to the Church was done here. {2} Church Lane was made wider in the year [1785] by taking a part of the Church yard. When a boy going to School and passing by the Church yard at the time when they was widening this street I have seen them dig up dead bodies very often, there was a deal of noise in the Town at that time about it. 1 The description of the Churchyard here given relates to the year 1785, when the widening of Church Street, and the making of St. James Row (originally called Virgins Row) by taking strips from the south and west sides led to the erection of iron railings. Similar palisading was added on the north side in 1791 - but East Parade was much later, dating from the time of the removal of the Town Hall in 1808. The walk opposite the Cutlers' Hall to the south door of the Church had been made in 1725 as a sort of safe approach for the Cutlers' Company, who paid for its construction and were responsible for its repair. Besides the steps at the north west corner, which remained after the St. James Row had been made, there were others at the north east corner into the Churchyard by the Boys' Charity School. The Girls' Charity School, now the offices of Messrs. Gibbs & Flockton, was the first building erected in St. James Row (1786) on part of the Vicarage Croft. Mr. Wigfull tells me that there is evidence of a north door into the Church, opening into the north aisle, opposite to the second bay from the west; and facing a similar entrance from the south. In the re-building, 1790-1805, other doors were substituted in a somewhat different position. These were closed in 1856, when the western entrance was made. Mr. Woolhouse was right in taking it for granted that everybody knew "that grocer's shop" at the corner of Paradise Street and Campo Lane; for there Thomas Newton and his successors did a large trade on small premises by supplying cutlers with emery, crocus and glue. Many of us remember it. 2 From 1722 the Capital Burgesses rented a "laith," or barn, on the property of the Heatons, for the accommodation of workmen during church repairs. In 1745, departing from the usual custom of obtaining bells from distant foundries a peal of eight was here cast, or recast, by one Daniel Hedderley, the metal being also locally supplied. The barn is always spoken of as "in the churchyard" until 1809 when, East Parade having been made, it "adjoined" the Churchyard, and having been used by the masons during recent rebuilding, its tenancy was then given up. It is possible that the Award relative to an alleged encroachment in 1636 quoted in H.A.S. Transactions, i. p. 74, related to this site. For the position of the East Parade News Room see H.A-S- Transactions. i. p 156- 10 The Town Hall was pulled down in the year 17‹-[1808] and the street made wider and in its present form. The High Street was composed of very low old-built houses, a many pulled down and others new fronted. I believe there was once, a little above the middle of this street, stood a Priory, and I believe that yard leading from Gales' Shop to High Street was once called Prior Row; and this Street, High Street, was then called Fryars Gate. {3} Where the present Shambles are built once stood the old Shambles built of wood and very dirty. I only remember seeing these old Wooden Shambles and being in them some several times. {4} There was a cross (the same was removed into Paradise Square) stood at the top of Pudding Lane (now King Street). A little lower down the Street stood the old Angel Inn, The most noted inn between London and Edinburg, kept then. by Mr. Samuel Peech, a very wicked but honest man. {5} A little lower, opposite the Sign of the Castle, once stood a Cross, (but before my time). {6} There was no Bank Street, nor do I believe that Street took its name from the Bank. But there was where the Bank now is, some very old houses stood as tho' they was upon a piece of rock or high bank, say 2 or 3 yards higher than the Street or road. As the Street was very imperfect at that time and a considerable deal higher than now, with a number of old houses all the way down Snig Hill. West Barr was in the same direction as now, only some new houses have been built and a number of old ones new-fronted. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3 I have on various occasions refuted, by the production of definite evidence, the fiction, persistent since the publication of Gosling's plan in 1736, that the original name of High Street was Prior Gate; and "Fryars Gate" is altogether mythical. Prior Row was never the passage between High Street and Hartshead now known (after many changes of name) as Aldine Court. It was the name of the houses along the north side‹that is, they were Prior Row in High Street. The houses on the south side were never described as Prior Row, but in High Street "over against Prior Row. " There is not the slightest historical basis for the statement that there was once a Priory in the street. "Shambles" has become so generally regarded as a synonym for slaughter- houses as to make it necessary to remember that Sheffield clung tenaciously to its primary, and etymological meaning a bench or stall, on which goods, and especially meat, were exposed for sale. When, in 1786, the butchers were relegated from the open street to better, but duller habitations within four walls, and with them the vendors of butter, eggs and poultry, the name was transferred with them it remained the Shambles, not the Market. Fruiterers and others continued outside until the demolition of the Debtors' Gaol in King Street, in 1818 (on the site now occupied by the Norris Deakin Buildings) made a void which they filled to the great relief of the congested streets but with some loss of picturesque but slovenly litter. (For Killing Shambles see Note 3). 5 The Irish Cross. The Castle Inn stood at the corner of Water Lane, facing Angel Street. 6 This somewhat confused paragraph seems to suggest that Bank Street took its name from the rather abrupt descent of the ground towards Snig Hill and the commencement of West Bar - apparent enough farther on, in Scargill Croft and New Street. But there is nothing more certain in Sheffield nomenclature than the fact that Bank Street, made in 1791, was run through "the orchard or garden " of the bankers, Shores, and took its name from their bank the structure of which is still seen behind and above the shop at the corner of Angel Street and Bank Street. It was originally intended to call the latter Shore Street. By 1793 it had become known as Bank Street. 11 There was an old Workhouse at the end of West Barr, at the Bottom of Workhouse Croft. This Workhouse was considerably enlarged in my time and was entirely pulled down in the year 1829. At the North side of this Workhouse stood a Quantity of old houses, upon West Barr green. They was pulled down to make the large opening Street at the west end of West Barr green. These houses proceeded nearly to the bottom of Lambert Croft. At the bottom corner of Lambert Croft stood a Public house kept by Charles Kelk.{7} It stood within the Street and was pulled down to make the Street uniform at the bottom. Gibraltar Street was a deal narrower in places than now, and there was a long walk on the right hand going on, and all was fields and Gardens to the Cotton Mill, a Mill which stood upon the ground where the Workhouse now stands. The Lancasterian School was then a Rolling Mill belonging to one Parkin. The Public house opposite the Lancasterian School, (Sign of the Greyhound) was kept by John Hinchcliffe, one of the acting Constables of Sheffield. This was the last house in Sheffield that way; beyond the Lancasterian School was all fields and gardens. On the right hand side and near to where Ebenezer Chapel now stands was a bowling Green, a very elegant one kept by John Hinchcliffe.{8} My father used to frequent this Green often and I have been many a time to accompany him home when a boy from this Green. The Shales Moor commenced here. It was a piece of Waste ground reaching from the bottom of Trinity Street to where the Roscoe Factory is built. It was there where the Farmers used to deposit the manure which they brought out of the Town. There was some Steps to go over into a Field called the Coach gate, this is now Hoyle Street, which led up to Mr. Hoyle's house. There was a Carriage road through this field up to Mr. Hoyle's House and a small brook of water run through it and from here this water was conducted underground into the river.{9} It goes just under the doors and windows of those houses in Cornish Street, thro' Green Lane into the river. It was what used to overflow at Crookes Moor dams. Proceeding on, now Cornish Street, was a very large and neat Bowling Green belonging to the Cleekham public house. Afterwards a large Steam grinding wheel was built and the green destroyed; then the wheel was destroyed, and Mr. Dixon's white metal manufactory built upon the ruins.{10} 7 Charles Kelk was dead in 1797, and the house was kept by his widow, and West Bar and West Bar Green so teemed with public houses that the sign of this is doubtful. 8 Hence Bowling Green Street. 9 Hence Watery Street. 10 Cornish Place. The main Turnpike road went on this way at that time up past Morton Wheel which is now Vulcan Works,{11} and a foot-road used to strike into the fields a little above Cleekham Inn on the left hand and come out again near the bottom of Pack Horse Lane (now the Lane leading up to the Barracks).{12} My GrandFather kept a public house in Green Lane and this Cleekham Inn was also one at that time. The large house (I don't know who dwells there now), with the Pallasades and Trees before it, was built upon the place where my GrandFather kept ale. I can remember the same workshops my GrandFather had; they was standing but not the house. The foot road at that time came up close by my GrandFather's house and kept up by the water side to the front of the Cleekham Inn. There was a long walk fenced on each side with a Stone wall, came from the end of Spring Street (or Spring Croft called at that time) up Long Croft to Green Lane, and not one house built between Spring Croft and Green Lane. My mother saw them building the first Silk Mill. The Contractor or overlooker for the building boarded at their house in Green Lane‹while the Mill was building. This Mill was burnt down several times, I saw it myself each time. The present Workhouse stands upon the same ground as the Mill used to do. Kelham Wheel was part belonging to the Mill. {13} We will now return to Gibraltar Street. On the left hand side as you proceed to Cupalo Street, there used to be a Cupalo at theTop. This Street is much as it were; same by Copper Street, and Trinity Street and Snow Lane. Smith Field has had a many houses built in it. Mr. Morton, Silversmith (Mr. Thomas Dunn, Table Knife Manufacturer, married his Daughter). I knew this Mr. Morton very well and he told me himself that he dug the first sod up in Smith Field to build his house upon, and he built the first house in ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11 Morton's Wheel was very ancient. Vulcan Works on its site have become Rutland Works. The Owlerton Road ran much nearer to the river than at present. 12 The old Barracks at Philadelphia. When the Langsett Road was widened it went through these. The present Barrack Lane indicates approximately their position. The last part of this sentence is rather obscure, but it probably means that the writer having followed the turnpike to Morton Wheel, returns to Cleckham Inn (Cornish Place), and describes a footpath leading thence on his left in the direction of the present Infirmary Road once rural Whitehouse Lane; whence Causey Lane led to Upperthorpe and Daniel Hill. Now it is interesting to find Mr. Woolhouse speaking of Pack Horse Lane hereabouts, because it suggests (and additionally in conjunction with "Causey Lane"), a connection with that Racker Way which Mr. T. Walter Hall traced from Walkley Hall to Stannington. H.A.S. Transections, i. p. 63. Nor is the interest removed if this interpretation be wrong, and the writer meant that Pack Horse Lane led to the old Barracks. Because there is thence also an approach to Daniel Hill, but from the other side, by what is now called Woollen Lane. Further, what has become Infirmary Road is marked, on early nineteenth century maps "Walkley Road." 13 The silk mill, built in 1758, became a cotton mill. It was burnt down in 179~, and again in 1810. 13 Smith Field. What is now Allen Street was a very deep narrow Lane. My mother used to come from Green Lane to Sheffield to School sometimes up this lane. It was then called Cuckoo Allen Lane because they generally heard the Cuckoo sing first in this lane as they went to School. The House now occupied by Mr. Hoyle was my GrandFather's nearest neighbour, as Green Lane was all Tanyards belonging to Mr. Aldam of Upperthorpe‹no house between this house (now Mr. Hoyle's) and Green Lane. This Elegant Country house as it was then, belonged to a very eminent Lawyer, called Redfern (oftener by the name of Devil Redfern). These Hoyles is descended from him. This House in my Time was situated in the midst of Fields, Gardens, and pleasure grounds. There was a row of Aspen trees from Allen Lane to Burnwell as high as most houses, used to shade the road as you approached to the house, also very elegant privet hedges, and a very large Rookery, a large Dove Cote, etc. etc., Stables, out-buildings, etc. etc. etc.{14} There was no road any higher than the passage from top of this Allen Lane into Scotland Street on the left hand; going up on the right hand was this walk over-shadowed by these fine trees I have just mentioned. Our servant girl used to fetch water from the Burnt Tree from Lambert Croft. In Summer time there was branches of water, only one in some streets, and a person (they used to call him Water John) used to come twice a week and blow a Horn at the lop of Lambert Street as there was one [branch] fixed there and you used to take your Kit or Flasket. He would have filled it twice for a penny. But then in Summer this water used to run short and you was compell'd to fetch it where it was most to be had. This Burnt Tree water was plentiful. I have gone with the servant girls on a Summers evening and I believe you would have met above 20 upon the same errand. The lasses used to be very fond of going there for water. 14 Mr. William Hoyle, attorney and Clerk to the Cutlers' Company from 1777 to 1792, married a daughter of John Redfearn whose wife was a Fretwell of Hooton Levett‹whence the later Fretwell Hoyles. Hoyle succeeded to Redfearn's practice and house, which latter is sometimes described as at Portmahon, at others as Netherthorpe. Portmahon has fallen into disuse, surviving in little more than the name of a Baptist Chapel. The position of Netherthorpe, the antithesis to Upperthorpe, is indicated by Netherthorpe Place. The house stood at the present corner of Hoyle Street and Meadow Street, the entrance to its grounds being in Burnt Tree Lane, which curved round them. The lane still exists between Meadow Street and Doncaster Street, but it has been straightened. Meadow Street is a comparatively modern improvement. 15 Brinsworth's (or more probably Brelsforth's, for the name is found in all manner of spellings Orchards became Orchard Street FROM THE OLD CHURCH TO CROOKES MOOR. I have mentioned what an old, low, dirty Street Church Lane was. Proceeding up, there was Brinsworth Orchards {15} on your left (this Street was not all built at that time). On your right is now Vicar Lane but there was no St. James Street, no Vicar Lane, no St. James Church. These places was the Vicarage Crofts. The next Street up Church Lane was Solomon's Row (now Smith Street). This Street used to be called Bloody Row. The following circumstancegave it that name. One Solomon Smith and his son going to Chesterfield Races, a Gentleman's carriage happened to be coming from Chesterfield to the Race Common, a little on this side of Stone Gravels (my Father has shewn me the place very often). The son, then a boy, threw a Stone and frightened the Gentleman's horses. The Gentleman ordered his Footman to horsewhip the boy for so doing. The boy got over a wall and run across the fields, the Footman in pursuit after him. There happened to be in one of the fields some old Coal Pits. The Footman overtaking him began of horsewhipping him and drove him into one of these old Coal pits, so that the boy was killed upon the place. The Father had the case investigated into; The Footman was committed to prison to take his trial. The Gentleman bargained with this Solomon Smith for so much money not to appear against the man at the Assizes, so by that means the man was acquitted. With this money he (Solomon Smith) sold his son's life, for he built Solomon 's Row or Bloody Row, as it was once called (it is now Smith Street). {16} When I was a Boy it was reported that this Street was haunted. My aunt used to live in it for a number of years, and I have heard her and the rest of the family say that they have heard dreadfull noises in the Street at midnight many a time. Past this street you proceeded (inclining rather to your right) on Pinfold Street (now Bow Street),{17} Pinfold Lane, very old low houses; the Pinfold same as now. On your left was Blind Lane, a very narrow old Street; the houses was unregular built, no West Street. All at the back of Blind Lane on your right hand was fields and Gardens. This Blind Lane continued a very narrow .street untill it came to the top of Coal Pitt Lane. The Balm Green, on your left hand; this Balm Green was composed of very old houses, but no regular Street. At the entrance of Blind Lane on your right hand was a foot road (in 16 Smith Street has been swallowed up in Leopold Street. This story of Miser Smith is one of many. It has been told before but not so fully as here. Local gossip fixed the sum left by Smith at his death at £60,000. He was reputed to have justified the omission of any provision for his housekeeper from his will by the remark: "Why should I ? She has had an easy place, she has earned a good deal of money by sewing at nights, and I found her a candle." 17 Bow Street was never Pinfold Lane or Pinfold Street. It was made in connection with Glossop Road in 1821, through old tenements and cutting across a narrow "jennel" called Sands Paviours, which ran from Orchard Lane to Pinfold Lane between Smith Street and Blind lane (Holly Street) 15 being now) at the back of the Brown Cow. {18} This footpath led into the fields to go to Broom Hall and Broomhall Spring and Crookes Moor that way. No Carver Street, where Carver Street Chapel now Stands was fields. I have exercised with the Regiment of Loyal Independent Sheffield Volunteers under Colonel Athorpe, in which Regiment I served for 6 years, upon the same place where the Chapel now Stands, very often. {19} From this Chapel to Sheffield Moor was all Fields. Proceeding on Trippett Lane, this was a narrow Street, nearly same as now. Bailey Field (now Street) was not complete. This was the last street on the right hand. Going forward, on your left hand was, (and is yet) a narrow passage which used to lead from Trippett Lane into the Fields, and a foot path leading from here over the fields into Back Fields, From the bottom of this narrow passage was a lane leading into the fields out of Trippet Lane to go to Broomhall Spring. {20} Forward on, Trippett Lane was a very deep narrow lane and rose up to a high hill at Portobello. No Bailey Lane; from where Bailey Lane now is to Crookes Moor, was all Fields and Gardens. Where St. George's Church now stands was a particular high hill, it was Gardens and supposed to be the pleasantest Gardens about Sheffield. Turning down Broad Lane on your right hand was all Cornfields as far as Bailey Field; on your left hand was houses but unregular built. No Red Hill Street. Proceeding down Broad Lane at the bottom on the left hand is Garden Street, this was not a Street at that time but partly Gardens, no road through into Red hill.{21} 18 'The writer, after a divergence along Blind Lane to Balm Green, here returns to the junction of Pinfold Lane with Trippett Lane. The footpath he speaks of still exists and is known as West Bank Lane. It emerges in West Street opposite to Carver Street, and has (or had) a branch to Rockingham Street. 19 The Loyal Independent Volunteers were in being from 179~ to 1802. Carver Street Chapel was built in 1805. 20 'This description of the footpath is not clear. No doubt there were several up the slope of the hill, leading towards the lane which became Broomhall Street and, on the right, towards Convent Walk. Back Fields, or Back Lands, often written Black Lands, was the whole region extending north to south from West Street to Sheffield Moor, east to west from Coal Pit Lane to Broomhall Street and Fitzwilliam Street. Coal Pit Lane marks the division between the Townships of Sheffield and Ecclesall, and along the Back Lands Division Street was run, across it Carver Street, Rockingham Street and Eldon Street. The populace converted Back Lands Lane (Broomhall Street) into Black Lambs Lane. 21 Garden Street Chapel was built in 1780, and there were not A few residents in Garden Walk, as it was usually called, by 1787 - Although there was no street at Red Hill there was access over its Waste to the Brocco Going up Townhead Street this was once the principal head of the Town. The Town at one time ranged very little higher than this Street. It was a deal more hilly than at present and a considerable deal narrower. There was formerly some very good public wells in this Street. On the left is Rotten Row. I believe this Street retains more of its ancientness than any other Street in Sheffield. The water course still continues to run in the middle of the Street, as most streets did 50 years ago. This was once a very populace street leading to the Town Head Cross, etc., it is not a very popular street at this time. {22} At the top of Town Head Street stood the old Grammar School, the road in front of this School was raised so as to be even with the roof. A little below in the yard was the old Writing School, John Eadon, Master.{23} I learnt at this school under Mr. John Eadon. The Grammar School is now removed into Charlotte Street at the top of Broad Lane. The first public Brewery was first established at the top of Townhead Street, the proprietor was Mr [John Taylor 1756]. {24} Going along Campo Lane is Holy Croft, {25} there is very little alterations in this Street except at the bottom which used to be very narrow and a good Stone house built in this Street. This large house (it was all in one) was untenanted a many years when I was a boy because say'd report in those days it was haunted and no one durst live in it ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- (22) The popular name for Rotten, or Ratten Row, indicated the sordid neglect befalling a thoroughfare whose proper designation was Radford Row, so called from Thomas Radford, Redford, Radforth or Redforth, the principal owner who lived and had his works hard by. He was Master Cutler in 1725, the year of the rebuilding of the Cutlers' Hall, when he made a curious claim for compensation for the loss of certain perquisites his predecessors had enjoyed. His house was in recent times a well-known fishing tackle shop at the bottom of Broad Lane End. Like Red Croft, in Trippett Lane, the houses of Radford Row made an island, their backs to Broad Lane End, and ran from the bottom of Townhead Street (which Gosling marks as Well Street) to Tenter Street. The Town Trustees tinkered at this squalid purlieu in 1831; later, as one of the most noisome haunts of iniquity in the town. it was wholly swept away and its site makes the eastern side of the space at the bottom of the new Hawley Street. (23) John Eadon was Master of the Free Writing School from 1760 to his death in 1810. For many years he was also writing master at the Grammar School. Mr. Woolhouse's caligraphy is one of many proofs that penmanship was not the neglected art it seems to be in the schools of to-day, but Mr. Eadon does not appear to have had a great success in teaching him grammar. Eadon's Arithmetical and Mathematical Repository survives as testimony to the author's skill in figures. Like many other schoolmasters of his period he did some land-surveying. Sims Croft, now abolished, was made through land on which the two schools had stood. (24) The statement that John Taylor established in 1756 the first public brewery in the town, where afterwards was The Warm Hearthstone, is manifestly culled from 7 he Sheffield Local Register. But there was an earlier one in Scargill Croft, for in the Leeds Mercury for May 17th, 174g, Thomas Elliott vaunted the products of the "Sheffield Brew-house" there situate. (25) Sheffield could never make up its mind whether to call this Holy Croft, or Hawley Croft which is not, perhaps, surprising, since the earlier generations of the Holy wrote themselves Awley and Hawley. The old house referred to is apparently one described in Sheffield in the Eighteenth Century, p. 176, as bearing the date 1721, though there was another in the same street dated 1729. The former is believed to have been the residence of John Smith, Master Cutler in 1722. After that it became the Ball Inn, kept by Jonathan Beardshaw, following whom was Thomas, or as he was usually called, Squire, Bright. As he was one of the twelve persons designated in the directory of 1787 as "Gentleman," it is possible that he was a descendant of one of the Bright families of Whirlow, etc., although here he was a rate-collector. The initials on the 172g house were those of Jonathan Moor, Master Cutler in 1723. 17 (what a dark age). Proceeding on Campo Lane there is a few old houses pulled down and new ones built, but it is yet a very narrow Street. There is a remnant of a part of an ancient wall still standing on your right hand. I have no doubt but ere long this street will be made considerable wider to the top of Paradise Square. This square in my Parent's time was a Cornfield called Hicks Stile field. My mother has seen Corn grow in this Square. I will relate one circumstances to show what the 17 Century was. My GrandFather as I have said in the former part of this work, lived at Green Lane and kept a public house. He likewise carried on the Trade of Pocket Knives. One of his men was lame and compell 'd to have Crutches to assist him to travel for a number of Years. His residence was in Gregory Row. My mother has mentioned his name often. This person was out late one evening and had to come on Campo Lane, he saw (or fancied he saw) the Bargast (as it has been frequent]y called) Coming towards him on Campo Lane.{26} At that time the Paradise Square was a field and a Stile at the top to go over. When he first saw this goblin he thought within himself " If I can but get over this stile into the field I can go down the hill merrily. " Gregory Row was a very narrow Row or Street at the bottom of Paradise Square. This was a very high hill at that time. The bottom of the present Street has been raised 3 or 4 feet in my time. He managed over this Stile, but the fiend gained ground of him. Faster he went and faster it followed, he ran with his Crutches till his fears came thicker and faster, and this demon still getting nearer, when, being about the middle of this field (the Square) seeing this goblin close at his heels, he there dropt his Crutches and away went he without them, and never stopt or look'd behind him until he got home (he lived in Gregory Row, a very narrow thoroughfare out of West Bar Green and came out at the bottom of Silver Street at the back of the now Sign of the Little Tankard). The wife had the door made, but him being in such a fright had not patience to wait until she opened the door but burst it open. He told the wife what was at the door, but she was the worse frightened at him coming without his Crutches than at the Bargast. However they were a little reconciled and went to bed. He could not rest from fright etc., got up at daylight the next morning to go in quest of his Crutches; he found them in exactly the same place where he dropt them. He went to his work the next morning and his Shopmen was nearly as frightened to see him come trotting to the shop without his crutches as he was when he saw the Bargast. However he was so overjoyed that he gave his Shopmen a treat of some ale, and they spent the day Cheerfully; and he for his own part never used Crutches again while he lived, and he lived a many years after this. So much for this Bargast. 26 Hunter (Glossary) says the Barghasts were peculiar to towns or places of public concourse, not to the country, the features by which they were distinguished being long teeth and saucer eyes. This is borne out by the examples of the use of the word in the English Dialect Dictionary. It quotes Grose's remark that the Barghast was a ghost "commonly appearing near gates and stiles"; and a Cumberland definition, "a boggle that haunts burial places" both of which characteristics are appropriate to the story above. This Street, Campo Lane, is supposed to take its name from a camp being there in the time of the Romans. At the end of this Street once stood the old Boys' Charity School, an Ancient looking building. The back yard went into York Street.{27} This street (York Street) is much as when I first knew it. At the end of Campo Lane on your left is Figtree Lane, a very ancient Street; also New Street, this was a very narrow, hilly Street and a public well at the bottom. It is supposed that the Vicarage was once in Figtree Lane; the dwelling is now a Currier's Shop. {28} The narrow passage from the end of Campo Lane into New Street (called Figtree Lane) all around here was orchards only a little before my time. Where Queen Street Chapel is built was figtree Orchard or Wade's Orchard. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 27 The "Ancient-looking" Boys Charity School was erected 1710, with its front to the Hartshead. When rebuilt in 1825, East Parade had been made, and thereafter the School looked to the west instead of the north. 28 The delusion, shared by many, that the Vicarage was once in Figtree Lane, is a misunderstanding of the fact that here were the houses of two of the Assistant Ministers, bequeathed by Robert Rollinson. The Vicarage was always where Messrs. Eadon's Auction Mart stands, at the corner of St. James Street and St. James Row. For an account of the Currier s Shop of Joseph Smith, and his sons, afterwards librarians at the Mechanics' Library, see Reminiscences of Old Sheffield, p. 23. "The shop was a stone building, apparently two centuries old, with small leaded window panes. " As Mr. Woolhouse says nothing of the large figtree or figtrees, which once grew here, and gave the street its name, I suppose they had vanished when he wrote. FROM SNIG HILL. TO THE LADIES BRIDGE. There appears nothing new in Hollis Street only when the river rose to an uncommon height. Mr. Jonan. Green who is still alive has told me that he has seen the water from the Millsands rise as high as the Steps leading into the Sign of the Three Travellers, at the top of the Street.{29} Bridge Street used to be called Under water on account of it being so low as it was under the level of the river. Then they ascended into by 3 steps from the Isle. To go over the Ladies Bridge you had to ascend a flight of Steps, and Wagons carts etc used to go through the river {30}. (29) By Hollis Street is meant the street in front of Hollis's Hospital. That institution was removed to Whirlow in 1903, just two hundred years after its foundation. I put in this note to prevent confusion with Hollis Croft, which was made on land called "Brocho Hill" purchased by Thomas Hollis in 1727, and vested by him in the Trustees of the Hospital. The Three Travellers, a noted carrier's inn, stood in the now open space at the bottom of Snig Hill (30) We may safely reject this statement of a carriage bridge being obstructed by a flight of steps. Sheffield gossip had probably, in the course of passing down from generation to generation, confused the talk of the elders about steps having once led from the lower level of "T'Under Watter" up to the Dam Gate End of the bridge, and taken it to mean steps on the bridge itself. The House (now next to Mr. Rawson's Brewery gate is now a Cooper's Shop) had 4 or 5 Steps to go into the House, the Chamber of which is now the Cooper's Shop. The Water Lane was a very hilly street leading into Millsands. Very few houses in Millsands. The Town Mill for grinding the Town's Corn, as was the ancient custom, was here. I judge the same Mill occupied by Mr. Vickers, as he has upon his Cart Tickets "Town Mill. " There was formerly from the top of Millsands Stones set up in the river for people to pass over to Bridge Houses. My father has seen them and gone over them.{31} 31 See Note 42. 32 The above passage needs some elucidation to make it intelligible to the modern reader, especially now that the fussy meddlesomeness of our municipal ~vise- FROM THE CHURCH (THE PARISH CHURCH) TO THE LADIES BRIDGE. The High Street I have mentioned, when you arrive at Change Alley no alteration here only old houses (new fronted). Passing these on the right hand was [on the top] some low old houses which they pulled down to make the new Market. There was no Market Street. A little below the (now) Market Street was a low public house Sign of the Star, where Mr. Roger a publican now dwells, a very noted public house, (one Mr. Littlewood kept it; he is now living). Where the Commercial Inn now stands was a Hair dresser's-Shop and house, one of the first in the Town, as it was a very good and genteel trade at that time. This hair dresser the Landlord wanted from off the Premises, to pull them down to make the Commercial Inn, so they unroofed the house before they could compell the tenant (the Hair dresser) to leave. This house fronted Jehu Lane as well as down the Bull Stake Here, of course, Mr. Woolhouse is speaking of what he had heard, not what he had seen. I also venture to question the statement that there was once a ford here. acres has flouted immemorial usage by merging what was the Fruit Market in High Street. If, in the year 1784, you had stood near the bottom of Pudding Lane (King Street) with your back to the Bull Stake (Old Haymarket), and had looked southwards, you would have seen on your left, on the line of the properties on the lower side of Fitzalan Square, the narrow Jehu Lane, leading to Baker's Hill; at its western corner the barber's shop of Peter Jeeves or Jervis. To its right, other tenements and then, projecting somewhat, the house spoken of above as, later, the Star Inn. Beside and behind this were the Slaughter-houses, and facing it, an open space used as a Swine Market. Before 1797, Swine Market and Slaughter-houses had both been removed, the New Markets supplanting the former and Market Street being run through the site of the latter. And in a few more years, the order was (left to right) Jehu Lane, the Commercial Inn, Theaker's Coffee-house, the Star Inn, Market Street. Jehu Lane was always a very narrow, dirty street. The reason as I have read of the name of Jehu being given to this lane was when Mary Queen of Scots (who was a prisoner nearly 16 years at the Castle and Manor House in the Park under the guardianship of the Earl of Shrewsbury) was going from the Castle to the Manor House through this lane was then the road. The Coachman in driving thro' this lane used to make use of this expression to his horses "Jehu," which from that circumstance derived the name of Jehu Lane, and continues so to be called to this Day.{33} 33 This wild guess as to the origin of the name, Jehu Lane, and its wide acceptance, does more credit to the imagination and credulity of Sheffield than to its erudition. It is enough to say that the obvious way from the Castle to the Manor was down Dixon Lane and over Sheaf Bridge. To thread the narrow Jehu Lane and crooked Shude Hill was a roundabout way of seeking unnecessary trouble. From here going down Bull Stake on the right hand was all very low ancient houses with most of them courts before them and steps to descend from the Street into them, as far as Dixon Lane. Lower down stood the Castle Laiths. These they pull'd down to build the Tontine Inn. I can only just remember these.{34} (34) As the Tontine was opened in 1785, we get here a guide to the limit of Mr. Woolhouse's personal reminiscences and thus distinguish them from hearsay. Where the Town Hall stands was some old Houses, built with no regularity, from this corner to the corner of Castle Green. Castle Street was called True Love Gutter, but from what I can't tell.{35} 35 Truelove's Gutter took its name from a resident family named Truelove. Down Wain gate was a very hilly Street and a many old houses irregularly built, no Killing Shambles, we cross over the Bridge into the Wicker. There was very few houses on the left hand side from the Bridge to Bridgehouses; on the right hand was all Gardens. The houses on the right hand going down the Wicker was in no form; an old house or two stood in the middle of the now Turnpike road, the Sign of the Cock, which was a calling-house for all the Grimesthorpe people. It was then a very narrow road to Handly Hill. Handley Hill was a deal higher than now .{36} 36 By Handley Hill, Spital Hill is meant. The house of the Handley family, Hall Carr, was near where the Victoria Corn Mills now stand in Carlisle Street. The Turnpike road went under this hill and came with a bow to the Sign of the 12 o'Clock. The road came in just at this side of the 12 o'Clock. The present Turnpike road was all Gardens and the foot road was close by the houses, on the right hand going on this road was called the Pickle. {37} the Turnpike road from top of Handley Hill to Grimesthorpe was a very narrow deep lane and the foot road was along the fields on the right hand side until you came to the narrow lane going down to Hall Car Wood, then you cross'd the turnpike and the road went along the fields on that side and thro' that little wood nearly at Grimesthorpe. The Lane was so deep that I have seen a Cart laden with hay in the turnpike and I could have strode on the top of it from the field. {38} (37) The Twelve o'clock Public House and tollgate stood where Savile Street and the Attercliffe Road diverge. The Pickle was on the right hand side of the latter. (38) What used to be known as Occupation Road is meant. As that name implies, it was not a turnpike road, hut a semi-private country lane for the accommodation of the farms to which it led. It is now one long monotonous town street, and it goes by the name of Grimesthorpe Road. We will now return to the Bottom of Snig Hill to go to Bridge Houses. The Street called Goulston Street going past the sign of the Punch Bowl, leaving Spring Croft on your left. Spring Croft from here was partly field on the right hand side and when you was going along this Street, on your right you could see across the fields into the Bridgehouses. At the far end of this .street turning up Bower Spring was a large Garden belonging to the Workhouse. At the bottom, on your right hand Corner going up, a little above, is yet Bower Spring, a running water which has supplied this end of the Town with good water before I was born. I have fetch'd many a hundred Gallons from it myself, to the top of Lambert Street. It was dry in the year 18‹, but Mr. Benj, Beet, a particular friend of mine, lived at Sign of the Shakespear and many of the water troughs is in his backyard under ground. He applied to the Town Trustees concerning this and they order'd him to make such search for this water as in his Judgment was best. After much labour and expense they found it again to the joy of the whole neighbourhood. It was above 3 months quite dry (this he told me himself) and it now runs as plentiful as ever. It was never known to fail before that time. {39} Now return to the Sign of the Punch Bowl Corner of Spring Street for the Bridgehouses. (39) The reference here to Bower Spring throws light on certain minutes in Records of the Burgesses. The first (p. 440), 6th Oct. 1824, directs the Clerk "to enquire into the title of the Town Trustees to sower Spring and the ground immediately around it; and to ascertain by what authority the same has been lately obstructed and encroached upon; and to take such measure for the removal of the present obstructions and encroachments, and for returning the premises to their former state, as may be found advisable.~ Then five years later, 11th November, 1829 (p. 452), " Mr. Ellison undertook that the premises at sower Spring, held of the Duke of Norfolk by one Beet a publican, shall be restored to their former state, and thrown open to the public as heretofore. " Next, 7th Sept. 1835, inquiry is again to be made into the right of the Trustees to Bower Spring, and how far they can comply with Messrs. Warburton & Co.'s (brewers) application lo take in and enclose the same. Proceeding down this narrow Street towards the Bridge Houses there was no street on your right hand leading to Ladies Bridge.{40} 40 There was a thoroughfare for foot passengers long before, known as "Under the Water,~ and it had been made available for vehicles under the name of Bridge Street, earlier than 1808. But in this, and what follows, the writer is speaking of the state of things in his early life, or even before his own recollections. Compare my account of Coulson Crofts in the H.A.S. Trans- actions, i. pp. 365~. There is now a Malt Kiln at the bottom of this Street on your left hand. From here to the Bridgehouses was all fields and a very large Orchard. [on] The Orchard and fields from here to Bower Spring nothing was built. The road from this Malt Kiln I have before described was very narrow and the fields on your left hand was called Norris Fields, belonging to Mr. Norris in West Barr, a very opulent Razor Manufacturer, who lived in West Barr (once Master Cutler), but the French War so reduced his circumstances that he was an inmate at the Duke of Norfolk's Hospital and Died there. Proceeding past these fields was a large Orchard belonging to Mr. Burgin, Gardener, West Barr Green. This road continued till you came to a Small wooden bridge [over the goyt]. On the right side of this lane, for Street it was not then, lived one William Potts, [who; kept a public house (now Mr. Smith's). {41} 41 William Potts is described in the 1787 Directory as Victualler, Colston Croft, and in 1797, as of 20 Bridge Street. Under James Smith the house was known as The Punch Bowl‹as it still is. It is close to the narrow walk leading to the Town Mill and must not be confused with the more notorious Punch Bowl near by at the corner of Spring Street and Coulston Street once kept by Alfred (better known as Spotty) Milner. He was Drum Major in the Loyal Independent Sheffield Volunteers, this was a low old house. When the river Dunn used to swell I have seen it rise 3 Feet high in this house, there was a small Garden before the house. Proceeding forwards was a high wall. To the far end of the lane (now Street) only a few Garden Houses and 2 or 3 small Baths was built and young men and young women used to frequent them very much in Summer time to bathe. When you got to this Small bridge you continued on your left hand, same as now, only where the houses now is was a Orchard which you went round. The Kelham Wheel, on your right hand same as now to Bower Spring it was a small wheel at that time and called Kelham Wheel. This small bridge at the end of Bridge Street is now made of bricks and one arch leading to the Bridge Houses. There was 2 large fields between this small river and the River Dunn, but nothing built upon them (the cast metal bridge not built). Before this cast metal bridge was a wooden one over the same place and before this wooden one was Stones set up about 21 a yard higher than the water for people to pass over. My Father has passed over these stones many a time in coming that way from Grimesthorpe and he lived there with his Parents until he was at age. Then he came and resided in Sheffield. {42} 42 As the wooden bridge was erected about 1726, it is evident from this that the stepping stones remained and were even used, at least by boys, after the bridge was built The iron bridge replaced wood in 1795. It is interesting to note that the writer's father, h1 coming from Grimesthorpe to Sheffield, chose the way of Tom Cross Lane and Bridgehouses, thus unconsciously adhering to ancient tradition by taking what, in a recent lecture, I maintained to be the line by which the Romans reached Sheffield. 23 One of these Baths I have been speaking of was kept by a person of the name of Brocksop. He was a tall man and he and Mr. John Crome, printer, was the only 2 persons in Sheffield who wore Cock'd Hats as these hats was going out of Fashion when I was a boy. These 2 persons wore them some years after I was a man, say till I was upwards of Forty. FROM THE CHURCH TO BOTTOM OF SHEFFIELD MOOR OR (NOW) SOUTH STREET In going up Fargate there was houses built on both sides. The Lords House stood a little on the North side of the present Norfolk Row. A very elegant old House, it was inclosed by a Wall in a half Circle and Palisaded. The present Duke of Norfolk was born in this house. This I expect is the reason why it was called the Lord's house, he being Lord of the Manor. Where Norfolk Row is was a narrow foot passage into Norfolk St. From the Lord's house backwards was a large yard from the house to Norfolk Street called Stewards Croft where the Regiment of Loyal Independent Sheffield Volunteers used to parade. I belonged to this Regiment myself and has paraded in this Croft for a number of years. Above the present Norfolk Row on your left is Peper Alley leading to the Unitarian Chapel. This Chapel I believe to be the oldest Chapel in the Town built in the year 1700. The first brick house built in Sheffield was built in Pepper Alley and pulled down in 1837. Some thousands of persons went to view it. It was supposed to be built of such perishable material that it would soon yield to destruction, but it is yet standing and is likely to continue so to do. On your left is Pinstone Lane. No alteration much in this Street. The former name was Pinching Croft from, it is believed, this reason. In former times it was the sport of Shrove Tuesday to throw at Cocks in this Croft in this manner. A person, a man, would introduce a Cock alive and any person who would pay a Penny or twopence for each throw with a Stick at Certain paces from the Cock, if he knoct the Cock down with the Stick, the Cock was his. Persons who had Cocks used to get a good deal of money out of apprentice boys etc. every Shrove Tuesday in this manner.{43} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 43 A nobody of light is thrown on this strained derivation by Hunter's Glossary, where we read "Pinch"; a game which consists in pitching half-pence at a mark. " A form more usual than Pinching Croft, was Pincher Croft, and sometimes Pinson, but these, as well as Piston (like The Pickle, the Wicker, Campo Lane, Jehu Lane and others), have never been satisfactorily elucidated. The most reasonable suggestion, though mere conjecture, is that as, dialectally, to pinch is to be niggardly, or to stint, the Croft was mean in size and contracted in shape as if nipped by pinchers‹as pincers are usually called (Mr. Addy says pinsors). On your right hand is Brinesworth's Orchards (now Orchard Street~ These before my time was Orchards belonging to a person of the name of John Brinsworth. This street was only partly built in my time. At that end next Far Gate used to be a large sewer discharging itself just at the end of this Orchard Street. It was then called Sow Mouth. Proceeding forward was a many very low old houses on both sides the street. At nearly the top on the right hand stood Barker Pool a large square of water enclosed by a stone wall. I have seen it full of water many a time. It was built in the year l~ and destroyed in the year 17‹{44}. This Pool was made by one Mr. Barker living at Balm House, a large Farm house supposed to be situated in Coal Pitt Lane, as there was Orchards etc. where now Back Fields is, and went in a range to Balm Green. This Pool continued until it became a public nuisance as Dogs, Cats etc. used to be drowned in it. This Pool was first made to be used in Case of Fire in the Town. The Town at that time was so small that when they discharged this water out from this Pool, it run down every street in the Town. From this Pool to the top of Coal Pitt Lane was very narrow. Two carts was scarcely able to pass in this Street. The water road (or sink) used to run down the middle of nearly every Street in the Town. I think the only one is Ratten Row at present which runs in this way. When they pulled the old houses down from this Pool to the top of Coal Pitt Lane they found an excellent well in one of the Kitchens belonging to these old houses and has now erected a very elegant Town Pump upon the same place. The Houses where the Well Run Dimple Public House now stands is upon the exact piece of ground where Barker Pool formerly stood. 44 Mr. Woolhouse was judicious in leaving the date of the building of Barker Pool blank. For it is unknown. l once wrote: "The tradition is that one Barker of Balm Green took steps to make some sort of reservoir.... and it puts the date as 1434. All we know certainly is that in the year named there was a 'Barker of Balm' and that there had been a William Barker in 1379." The earliest definite mention of the Pool is in 1567. A plan of it, and its surroundings in 1793, the date of its abolition, will be found in Sheffield in the Eighteenth Century, p. 153. "Well Run Dimple" was the sign of a public house on, or about, the site of Mr. Cadman's book shop. Going down Coal Pitt Lane, this street used to be a very narrow low lane. There has been buried many a Hundred good Self-Tip handles and good bone nogs in this Street. I lived in this Street 26 years and it has been twice dug up and set again while I lived in it. At each of these times I have seen the men dig up barrows full of good Self Tip handles, when they was thrown away they no doubt did not know the way to straighten them as they appear'd all to be Crook'd, and I have seen the men dig up many a wheelbarrow full of bone nogs, but not fit for use, but they have sold them to Mr. Saml. Pass who lived opposite the Well Yard and used to buy bone dust. He told me himself that: he has paid the men 2 Pounds in one week for these nogs as bone dust. The men had this for their allowance for Drink. Nearly at the top of the street is a large dwelling (now turned into two) house which has a Court before it. Mr. Linley, Shear Smith, lives in part of it now. This is said was once the old Cutlers' Hall. {45} A little below on the right hand upon the hill is a range of houses above the Chapel. These was once all in one and is supposed was Balm House, as there used to be a large open yard and a deal of Stabling in my time, and behind this house was Orchards, gardens, etc. up to Balm Green. This Balm Green was the green belonging to this Balm Hall. Next to these houses is a Chapel built in the year [1774]. It has belonged to a many different Sects to my remembrance. {46} They are at present Methodists. A little below this used to be a Green and a number of good wells and troughs for water. There was one good well in my time as I lived upon the Well Yard; I have seen and got water from it hundreds of times. I saw this well made up as it had become a public nuisance for they used to drown dogs etc. in it. I remember a Certain time when a person who lived a little above this well at the house where the Pallisades is and a drain came from out of his Celler into this well. The person had a Rum Cask burst in his Cellar and the Contents drained into this well. The first person who came to the well for water in the morning was very much surprised at the singular taste and Colour of the water. The news soon spread in the street and a merry Jovial day it was to many, for it was many a time emptied of its Contents that Day. This Street has been considerably raised at the bottom and settled at the top end. The last time it was repaired they took some (I believe many hundreds) loads of earth etc from this street, and raised Sheffield Moor (now South Street). I have no doubt but Sheffield Moor was raised 4 feet in the middle from rubbish from Coal Pitt Lane. At the bottom of this street stood a sugar manufactory pulled down in 1834 or 5. My wife's Father (Abraham Moore) went to London for the model and he built it. It is now in a very ruined state (as the proprietors has built another near the Wicker) and is expected to be soon pulled down. 45 It was an old popular delusion that this, and other houses on which some Master Cutler, in his pride of office, displayed the Cutlers' Arms, had been the Cutlers' Hall. It is hardly necessary to say that all the Cutlers' Halls, in succession, have been on the present site. 46 The first Chapel in Coal Pit Lane was built by Edward Bennet, an Independent, who himself discharged the functions of Minister. In 1790 Howard Street Chapel was founded, largely through a bequest he left for the purpose. It was his father who, earlier, had been mainly instrumental in providing the early Methodists with their first two Meeting houses. The Coal Pit Lane Chapel gave place in 1835 to one erected for the Primitive Methodists. {47} What is now South Street was then Sheffield Moor. There was only a few straggling houses from the Sign of the Parrot, bottom of Coal Pitt Lane to the bridge at the bottom of the Moor. I have called this a bridge, but it does not deserve that name, as it was only a single plank or two laid to cross the river. ~arts etc. used to go through the river. From the bottom of Coal Pitt Lane to the bottom of the Moor, Cows, Horses, Asses, etc. used to be grazing all the day through. I have seen numbers of them in the daytime. 47 The sugar refinery was established by the above Edward Bennet who, in London had picked up a wife and some knowledge of "sugar baking." The Abraham Moore referred to is described in the 1797 Directory as a bricklayer, in Carver Street. At the time when Mr. Woolhouse wrote, the sugar refinery was in the hands of Samuel Revell, who, in 1836, pulled it down and removed to Nursery Street. Mr. Holy’s house and the Workshops (then a Button Manufactory) now Mr. Abraham's School. I his house etc. stood by itself, and the footroad used to go close by it. Mr. Kirkby's house a little above this last-mentioned place was then a pleasant Country house. It is yet standing.{48} I here was a few other odd houses here and there. 48 Mr. Holy's House, afterwards J. H. Abraham's (or rather, Miss Abraham's, for he taught chiefly in Milk Street) School, faced South Street at the southern corner of Eldon Street. I think it is now occupied by a club, and stands behind a line of shops. Kirkby's house was in Button Lane, where Eldon Street crosses it. The Ladies' Walk was where now Porter Street is. I his was a most pleasant rural walk from the top to the bottom of the Moor to the bridge. l his bridge was rather better than the last I have described, but this was made of wood flat and only one person at a time could pass over. I have waited many a time for my turn to go over. The Carts and Horses etc used to go through the river. This walk was shaded from top to bottom with elegant trees and ma(le entire by wooden railing. This used to be a particular walk for the Females on a summer's evening. From the Top of the Moor (now Porter Street), coming down Norfolk Street there was no house on your right hand until you came to the Assemby Room, all was fields down to Pond Lane, called Alsop Fields. There was a narrow walk from (now about Surrey Street) used to go direct into Pond Lane.
  6. Guest

    Help Solve This Mystery..

    Just read this, posted by Richard....explains why The Cutlers Company coat of arms are above Edwin Dale's old building. CHAPTER 11 - CUTLERS HALLS AND FEASTS. WE know with certainty of only three Cutlers' Halls. They successively occupied the same site, in Church Street. Their dates are I638, I726, I832. The late Mr. John Holland expressed the belief that there had been a still earlier hall, standing at the top of Coal Pit Lane, where, in his young days, there was a grinding wheel. Any evidence of the existence of such a building is wholly lacking. There was, until recently, an old house, with low mullioned windows, immediately above the Coal Pit Lane Chapel, which had been long in the family of Mr. E. Linley, sheep-shear manufacturer. Around this hovered a tradition that it had once been a Cutlers' Hall, but this was probably based on no more substantial foundation than the circumstance that over its door~say a stone shield bore the initials "J. L. S.," with the cross daggers. And the occurrence of Cutlers' Company insignia on houses in Sheffield and the neighbourhoodÑ whether utilised from older buildings, or carved by Masters or private members of the Company in pride of office or as a sort of trade markÑis too frequent for any special stress to be laid on the fact. From “Schooldays” Chapter 11 – The Cutlers Hall and Feasts http://www.omnesamici.co.uk/MemoriestRELeaderChapter11.html Thank's Richard, this confirms what I thought had happened.
  7. Here's extracts from a booklet about St Philips church that used to stand on Penistone/Infirmary road. I remember the graveyard used to be in between the roads as was my uncles car garage repair shop next door to it. The gravestones were moved to the redevelopment of the Hillsborough Barracks and these are the ones you can see stood straight up in the walls there. Note by the author This booklet, written in response to a request by the Vicar and Council of St. Philip's Church, will, it is hoped, not only revive memories of the past and be an additional link in the long chain of local history, but also help to deepen the interest of its readers in the work and needs of a large and exacting parish. It is now nearly seventy years since I first saw St. Philip's Church. All the vicars, with the exception of the first, have been known to me, and some of them have been amongst my intimate friends. It is hardly possible to realise the vast changes that have taken place since St. Philip's parish was first formed. Brief notes are given of its four daughter parishes, together with sketches of its former vicars, whose portraits have been re-produced from those now on the walls of the ante-church. It has been truly said that the prosperity of a Church depends largely upon its connection with the past; that, whilst not the slave, it is essentially the pupil of the past, and that lessons are learnt alike from its failures and successes. A hundred years have passed since St. Philip's Church was opened. May I venture to express the hope that the beauty of the restored and renovated Sanctuary may exceed that of its past, and also, before all things, that in its higher spiritual and social activities it will ever be a faithful witness to God and His truth, and go on from strength to strength, bringing forth fruit to the glory of God and the welfare of worshippers and parishioners alike. W. ODOM, Lindum Lodge, Psalter Lane, Sheffield, June, 1928 Forward by The Bishop Of Sheffield (Leonard H. Sheffield) It is with great pleasure that I write a Foreword to Canon Odom's last contribution to the Church life of the City of Sheffield. The Church and Diocese owe a great debt of gratitude to him for the way in which he has given much time in handing down for all future generations correct knowledge with regard to the fabrics and Church life of our city. This last booklet is both accurate and interesting. It gives a picture of the vast changes which a hundred years have wrought in one of the great cities of the Empire. We of this generation can hardly realise that the great parish Churches of Sheffield are comparatively young, and that they started their existence amongst green fields and steep slopes covered with trees, where now there are only long lines of artisan dwellings interspersed with vast industrial works. Bishop Lightfoot once said that "the study of history is the best cordial for a drooping courage." The brave efforts now being made by the people of St. Philip's are only one more illustration of that undoubted truth. The thanks of the parish are due to Canon Odom for his historical account of a parish which I hope will always be second to none in the enthusiasm and vigour of its Church life. I remain, Your sincere friend and Bishop, LEONARD H. SHEFFIELD, Bishopsholme, Sheffield, 7th June, 1928. STONES THAT SPEAK Stones still speak, and this is what St. Philip's Church is saying to us today. "Yes, I am very old, my Hundreth Birthday is on July 2nd, 1928, but I hope to live a long time yet. I started life with a great flourish of trumpets. People flocked to see me, and only those who had tickets could get inside. The Archbishop was there and all the rich and influential folk of Sheffield. They drove up in their carriages from miles around. It was a great service, the music was supplied by a band of fifteen instruments, and the collection came to £47 15s 7d. Can you wonder that I sometimes sigh for the good old days when I stood almost surrounded by fields, and Upperthorpe was the best part of Sheffield. Now I have lost my high position; no rich people worship within my walls. I am surrounded by factories, the smoke from whose chimneys has covered me inside and out with grime. In spite of all, however, I am not downhearted, for I know that many who do not often come still have a very warm corner in their hearts for me, having perhaps been brought to me as babies to be baptised, and having been married within my walls. I have had a great past, and look for a still more useful future. Will you make me a real big Birthday Present ?" Surely these words may form a fitting introduction to a brief record of the life and work of St. Philip's during a hundred eventful and changeful years. PEEPS AT THE PAST On referring to a plan of Sheffield by John Leather in 1823, shortly after the building of St. Philip's began, we find Roscoe Place marked at the junction of Shales Moor, Penistone Road and Walkley Road - now Infirmary Road. Beyond Dun Street and the end of Green Lane there were few buildings save a grinding wheel, until Philadelphia Place was reached. Here was another wheel, a tilt, and some scattered dwellings, whilst a little beyond were the old barracks. A few houses with large gardens were at Upperthorpe, which at that time was beginning to be a pleasant and favourable residential district. here lived the Master Cutler, Mr. John Blake, who in 1832 laid the first stone of the new Cutlers' Hall; he died of the plague the same year. Blake Street bears his name. Another resident of Upperthorpe was Ebenezer Elliott, the "Corn Law Rhymer," who in 1834, after removing his business from Burgess Street to Gibralter Street, rented a house which was afterwards known as "Grove Hous! e," probably that once occupied by the late Master Cutler, John Blake. In 1841 Elliott went to live near Barnsley, in a house he built there. What the neighbourhood of St. Philip's was like a few years before the Church was built, is seen from a fine engraving from a painting of 1798, taken from about Portmahon, and showing the back of the Infirmary, reproduced in the Centenary History of the Infirmary. A large chromo by the late W. Ibbitt, entitled "The Valley of the Don," gives a good idea of St. Philip's parish as it was in the year 1856; in it St. Philip's Church, the Infirmary, the Barracks, the Railway Viaduct at Wardsend, and the River Don are prominent. The late Mr. R.E. Leader in "Sheffield in the Eighteenth Century," tells us what that side of the town was like a few years before St. Philip's Church was consecrated:- At the bottom of Allen Lane land had been sold for the erection of another of the "water houses" in connection with the springs and dams at the White House, Upperthorpe; and here, as at the Townhead Cross, water was sold by the bucketful or barrelful. ...Then a riding school, afterwards utilised as the Lancasterian Schools, was erected at or near to the old bowling-green...Beyond, Shales Moor was an open waste, over which the road, recklessly broad, meandered on its way to Owlerton and Penistone. The present Infirmary Road was represented by rural Whitehouse Lane, and from it, about where Lower St. Philip's Road or Montgomery Terrace are, Cherry Tree Lane wound up with indecisive curvings to Causey Lane, by which the wayfarer could reach Upperthorpe; or retracing his steps towards the town, could return by a footway past Lawyer Hoyle's house at Netherthorpe, on the line of the modern Meadow Street to "Scotland." The following extracts from "Old Sheffield," by Mr. R.E. Leader, describe the neighbourhood early in the nineteenth century:- Allen Lane and the Bowling Green marked the extremity of the inhabited region of Gibralter. Beyond, the road ran between fields - Moorfields - and on to the distant rural haunts of Philadelphia and Upperthorpe. There was Lawyer Hoyle's house up on the left; and the little barber's shop, just before you come to Roscoe Place near the junction of the Infirmary and Penistone Roads, was alone in its glory until 1806, when Mr. Shaw built the stove-grate works, and with his partner, Mr. Jobson, laid the foundation of that trade which has obtained for Sheffield the manufacture of stoves and fenders previously claimed by Edinburgh and London.... Watery Street was a rural lane with a stream running down it....Allen Street, at that point of it across the Brocco, was only a highway, without any houses, so that there was a clear space and view from the top of Garden Street to the Jericho. This view included Mr. Hoyle's house (Hoyle Street), which then stood enclosed in what, perhaps, might be described as a small park. At the back of this house was a row of high trees, serving as a rookery, where the birds built their nests, and around which they might be seen taking their serial flights. the narrow lane, now called Burnt Tree Lane, was then the road from Allen Street to Portmahon in which there was a white painted pair of gates, with the carriage way running in a straight line to the front door of the house. THE "MILLION" CHURCH BUILDING ACT During the long reign of George III, 1760-1820, the lack of church accommodation was most manifest. Not only had the population greatly increased, but it had also become more concentrated in large centres, and provision for the working classes and the poor was altogether inadequate. Influence was brought to bear upon the Prime Minister, Lord Liverpool, and in the year 1818 a Parliamentary grant of £1,000,000 was voted for Church building in populous centres, to which another £500,000 was subsequently added. Side by side with this a great voluntary effort was made, and in 1817 the Church Building Society was formed, with the result that, including the one million and a half granted by Parliament, about nine millions was expended on Church Extension in the course of a few years. One result was that on March 28th, 1820, a meeting was held in the vestry of the Sheffield Parish Church (the Rev. Thomas Sutton being the vicar), to consider the proposal of building three new Churche! s. Ultimately four were built under the Act - Attercliffe, St. George's, St. Philip's and St. Mary's. The population of the town was then 65,275, comprising 14,100 families. THE CHURCH BUILT St. Philip's Church, the second of these "Million Act" Churches, occupies a prominent position at the foot of Shales Moor, between Infirmary Road and Penistone Road. When built it was on the outskirts of the town. What is now a mass of intricate streets and closely packed houses, extending for some miles and climbing the Walkley hills, was then a well -wooded rural district with scattered dwellings at Upperthorpe and Philadelphia. The Infirmary, close by, had been built thirty years before on the Upperthorpe meadows, amid attractive open surroundings. The style is Gothic, on a plan similar to that of St. George's, although it is considered somewhat inferior to that Church in its architecture, nor does it occupy so commanding a position. The architect was Mr. Taylor, of Leeds. It is a lofty and MASSIVE building with a tower at the west end. The clerestory has five windows on each side; the nave has embattled parapets with pinnacles. The interior has a gallery running round three sides; that at the west end projects into the tower and contains the organ. the pulpit, prayer desk and clerk's desk were formerly grouped together in the centre of the nave. The lofty pulpit is on the north side, whilst the choir, formerly in the west gallery, occupies the stalls in front of the chancel. The Church is 95 feet long and 78 feet wide. When built it afforded accommodation for 2,000 persons, but the number of sittings has since been reduced to 1,600 by the erection of the choir stalls and the cutting off at the west end of an ante-church or vestibule twenty feet wide, part of which now forms the choir vestry. The contract for the Church, including incidental expenses, was £13,970. Hunter gives the cost as £11,960. the cost of the gas fittings was £183, and that of the warming apparatus £125. The site - one acre and two roods - formerly part of the Infirmary lands called the "Hocker Storth," was given by Mr. Philip Gell, of Hopton, Derbyshire, a cousin of the Rev. James Wilkinson, Vicar of Sheffield, and who had inherited a moiety of the Broomhall estate. the Church was dedicated to St. Philip as a mark of esteem to Mr. Gell, whose christian name was Philip, and the first stone was laid by him on September 26th 1822. Owing to the contractor not being able to fulfil his contract and the death of the architect, the Church was not opened until July 2nd, 1828, when it was consecrated by Archbishop Vernon Harcourt. A special hymn by James Montgomery, who was present at the consecration, began with the lines: Lord of Hosts! to Thee we raise Here an house of prayer and praise; Thou Thy people's hearts prepare, Here to offer praise and prayer. Let the living here be fed, With Thy Word, the heavenly bread; Here in hope of glory blest May the dead be laid to rest. The Rev. Thomas Sutton preached the sermon from 1 Kings ix, 3: "I have heard thy prayer and thy supplication, that thou hast made before me: I have hallowed this house, which thou hast built, to put my name there forever; and mine eyes and mine heart shall be there perpetually." An immense congregation included leading families of the town, in addition to which visitors drove up in their carriages from miles round. There was an imposing procession from the gates of the old Parish Church to St. Philip's Church, headed by a band of fifteen performers. Here is a letter of July 26th, 1828, from the Rev. Thomas Sutton, Vicar of Sheffield, to Mr. Jobson, which reads: "The bearer is Foster, the leader of the band, who has a demand upon us for £5 which you will be pleased to pay him." With the letter is a list showing that there were fifteen performers, with five clarionets, two horns, one bass horn, one serpent, one trombone, one trumpet, two flutes, one double drum, one key bugle. At the east end is a large stained window containing fourteen memorial panels representing our Lord the central figure, the twelve Apostles and St. Paul. The two lower sets of five each bear the following names: Robert Johnson, Churchwarden, 1828; Mary Elliott Hoole, John and Mary Livesey; Maria Rawson; Elizabeth Frith; Charles & Elizabeth Atkinson; Joseph Sims Warner, Churchwarden, 1845; George & Elizabeth Addey; William Frederick Dixon, Churchwarden, 1831; William & Emma Kirk. The Church bell, by Thomas Mears, of Whitechapel, London, which cost £150, was set up in December, 1832. The clock in the tower, with three very large illuminated dials, made by Mr. Lomas, of Sheffield, the cost of which was raised by subscription, was opened in January, 1847. At the time an interesting correspondence took place, in which the Gas Company was asked, on the ground of public utility, to supply gas gratuitously, as was the case with the clocks of St. Peter's, St. Paul's and Attercliffe. the Directors of the Company replied to the wardens that the request could not be complied with, but that the Company would supply the clock with gas after the same rate as the public lamps of the town. The Church has a fine brass eagle lecturn, and a small plain stone font occupies a place at the east end of the north aisle. Two oak prayer desks are "dedicated in loving memory of the Venerable Archdeacon Eyre." The silver communion plate includes a very large flagon on which is engraved "St. Philip's Church, Sheffield, 1828," two patens, and two chalices. On the walls of the ante-church are the portraits of former vicars. In the vestry is a fine set of ten old oak chairs, two with arms elaborately carved; also a very fine iron casting of de Vinci's "Last Supper," presented by Mrs. Bagnall. MEMORIALS There are mural memorial tablets to the Rev. John Livesey, for thirty-nine years incumbent, who died August 10th, 1870, and his three wives, Sarah, Emily, and Mary. It is recorded that Sarah was the widow of Francis Owen, incumbent of Crookes, and shared his labours and perils as the first missionary clergyman to the Zulus and Betchuanas of South Africa. There is also a tablet to Frances Wright, a sister of Mrs. Livesey. In the south aisle is a white marble tablet to the Rev. James Russell, M.A., "for eleven years the faithful pastor of the parish," who died on January 12th, 1882, aged fifty-one years. The tablet, erected by the congregation, records his last words: "I know whom I have believed." In a window in the south gallery are stained glass panes representing King David, with musical emblems, and inscribed: "In memory of Thomas Frith, organist of this Church, born April 17th, 1808, died April 5th, 1850." On a pillar near the choir is a brass to Joseph Beaumont, who died on July 7th, 1903, for twenty-four years choirmaster and organist of the Church, erected by members of the choir as "a tribute to his musical ability, his faithful labours, genial disposition and blameless character." Another brass commemorates Edward Law Mitchell, for twelve years choirmaster and organist of the Church, who died November 18th, 1915, aged thirty-eight - "erected by congregation and choir." At the west end, on a pillar, is a brass to Charles Marriott, who died September 28th, 1849, in his fourteenth year - "One of the first set of boys of the choir of this Church established A.D. 1848 - erected by his fellow choristers." On the south side of the chancel is a brass with the inscription:- "To the glory of God and in memory of the Rev. Ernest Vores Everard, M.A., Vicar of this Church, 1912-1917, the Electric Lighting of the Choir and Church was installed in 1920." In the churchyard is a prominent monument to Dr. Ernest, who died on November 16th, 1841. He had been house surgeon to the General Infirmary from its commencement - forty-four years - and was the author of a booklet published in 1824, on the origin of the Infirmary. SITTINGS In 1828 it was decreed by the authorities that amongst other things two pews should be reserved for the vicar and his family and another for his servants; that 800 free sittings should be provided for the use of the poor; the remainder to be let at yearly rents and assigned as a fund for the stipend of the minister. The pews were divided into two classes. In 1847 the 1st class were let at 12/- per sitting, and the 2nd class at 10/- per sitting. In the early years the seat rents averaged £250 per annum, but they gradually declined, and in 1918 seat rents were abolished and the sittings declared to be free and open. The population of St. Philip's in 1921, including persons in the Royal Infirmary, was 15,968. The Vicar of Sheffield is patron of the benefice, the annual value being set down at £400, of which £183 is from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, £100 from the Sheffield Church Burgesses and £11 13s. 8d. from Queen Anne's Bounty. The Churchyard, closed for burials in 1857, is now laid out and planted with shrubs for public use under the Open Spaces Act. In 1924 long strips of the same, from eight to ten feet wide - altogether 583 square yards - were taken by the Corporation for the widening of Infirmary Road and Penistone Road; the Corporation undertaking to erect new boundary walls with palisading thereon to the two new frontages. WARDSEND CEMETERY In June, 1857, the Rev. John Livesey, anticipating the closing of the Churchyard, conveyed five acres of ground at Wardsend to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for a new burial ground, which was enclosed and a lodge and Chapel erected at a total cost of £2,600. It was consecrated by Archbishop Musgrave on July 5th, 1859, the greater part of the cost having been defrayed by Mr. Livesey. In 1901 the Cemetery was enlarged by the addition of two acres of land, and several improvements were made to the buildings. IMPROVEMENTS AND RENOVATION In 1847 a large sum was spent in repairing and enlarging the organ, at which on the re-opening Mr. Thomas Firth presided. The preachers were the Rev. G.B. Escourt, Rector of Eckington, and the Rev. E.S. Murphy, one of the chaplains of the Sheffield Parish Church and lecturer of St. Philip's. In 1879 a considerable sum was spent in improvements. In 1887 the Church again underwent extensive repair and improvement at a cost of £1000. The uncomfortable narrow high-backed pews were lowered and sloped, and fitted with rug seating. the organ was re-built and enlarged by W. Hill & Sons, the original builders. At the re-opening in June the preachers were Archdeacon Blakeney and Canon Favell. Dr. Bridge, organist of Westminster Abbey, presided at the organ. Collections £55 10s. 0d. In 1894 £600 was expended in renovation; further improvements were made in 1899 at a cost of £300; and in 1903 the organ was again repaired at a cost of nearly £100. In 1927 a new warming apparatus was fixed in the Church at a cost of £425. the effect of bringing the choir from the west gallery to new choir stalls at the east end of the nave, and other alterations reduced the number of sittings from 2,000 to 1,600. CHURCH REGISTERS The registers of baptisms and burials at St. Philip's Church date from 1828 and that of marriages from 1848. At those times and long afterwards by far the larger number of baptisms and marriages took place at the old Parish Church. The baptisms there in 1829 being 1,955 and the marriages 798. At St. Philip's in 1828 there were three baptisms. In 1829 the baptisms numbered 27, and the burials 420. In 1830 there were 15 baptisms, and 201 burials. In the year 1927 there were 148 baptisms and 96 weddings. At Wardsend Cemetery were 86 burials. THE ORGAN In the year 1840 - September 30th and October 1st - a large and costly new organ, by W. Hill & Sons, of London, was opened. A copy of the advertisement in the "Sheffield Mercury" announcing "Cathedral Services" on that occasion is before me:- Dr. Wesley, of Exeter Cathedral, will preside at the Organ. Principal Vocalists: Miss Birch, Mr. Francis, of St. Paul's Cathedral, Mr. Pearsall and Mr. Machin, of Lichfield Cathedral. The Choral Department will be sustained by a numerous and effective body of singers. In addition to the full Cathedral Services there will be a Grand Selection of Sacred Music from Handel, Haydn, Beethoven, Greene, Cooke, Travers, Kent, and the Wesleys. Prices of tickets- MORNING: Reserved Seats 7/-, First Class 3/6, Second Class 2/6. EVENING: Reserved seats 5/-, First Class 2/6, Second Class 1/6. Miss Birch, of London, was "in the highest grade as an English singer." She sang the following Selections by Handel: "Holy, Holy, Holy," "What though I trace," "Farewell ye limpid streams," "Bright Seraphim," "I know that my redeemer Liveth," "Angels ever bright and fair," and "With verdure clad." PAROCHIAL BUILDINGS The Day and Sunday Schools in Hoyle Street were built in 1832, at a cost of £1,200, by subscription and Government grant. They were subsequently enlarged, and more recently a considerable sum has been expended on alterations and improvements. the site is leasehold for 789 years at a ground rent of £10 15s. 0d. per annum. THE VICARAGE - In 1858, the Governors of Queen Anne's Bounty purchased at a much reduced price from Mr. Livesey, his freehold house and garden at Upperthorpe, as a parsonage for St. Philip's. After a time it was found unsuitable for the vicar's residence, and the Rev. John Darbyshire, during the seventeen years of his vicariate, lived at Claremont. When the Rev. J.W. Merryweather entered upon the incumbency in 1898, the house was improved and enlarged at a cost of over £600. EVERSLEY HOUSE - In 1919, the valuable freehold house and grounds comprising 1,052 square yards of land known as Eversley House, at the corner of Upperthorpe Road and Oxford Street, was given to St. Philip's by Mr. James Wing, steel manufacturer. After extensive alterations and furnishing, carried out at a cost of £2,000, it was opened as a Club and Institute for men, women, boys and girls, and is constantly in use for social, educational and temperance work, Bible classes, and other parochial purposes. It is held for the parish by the Sheffield Diocesan Trust. SPORTS FIELD - this, near Coal Pit Lane, Wadsley Common, was acquired in February, 1924, at a cost of £375, to be used for social and recreational purposes by the parishioners and congregation of St. Philip's. It is held in trust by the Sheffield Diocesan Trust THE OLD CLERGY HOUSE - In 1864, the late Miss Rawson, of the Hawthorns, Crooksmoor, conveyed to the governors of Queen Anne's Bounty in trust for the incumbent of St. Philip's, her former residence at Philadelphia on the Penistone Road, with the surrounding grounds, for many years used as a residence for the curate. This was sold many years ago and the proceeds invested to augment the income of the benefice. PARISH BOUNDARIES When in 1848 St. Philip's was constituted a separate parish, it covered 834 acres with a population of 8,340, and included Portmahon, Upperthorpe, Walkley, Barber Nook, Philadelphia, Owlerton, with parts of Hillsborough and Malin Bridge. Its southern boundary extended from the river Don along Dun Street, Matthew Street, part of Meadow Street, Netherthorpe, Watery Lane and up Dam Lane, as high as the old footpath, with a wall on either side, which led across Crookesmoor Valley to Steel Bank, and which divided St. Philip's parish from that of Crookes. The present boundaries are the river Don, Dun Street, Matthew Street, Meadow Street, Watery Lane, Burlington Street, Bond Street, Ashberry Road, Birkendale Road, Daniel Hill Street, Woollen Lane, Edith Street, West Don Street to the river. The boundary line runs down the centre of each street. FOUR DAUGHTER CHURCHES St. Philip's has now four daughter churches - St. Mary's, St. John the Baptist's, St. Bartholomew's, and St. Nathanael's - with a combined population of 45,838 which, with that of the mother church, 15,968, gives a total of 61,805, an increase probably of 60,000 since St. Philip's was consecrated:- St. MARY'S, WALKLEY, was constituted a parish in 1870. In 1861 a Mission Church, consisting of two bays and a chancel, was built in Howard Road by the Rev. J. Livesey, at a cost of £1,000. The Sheffield Church Extension Society (No: 1) having taken up the matter by completing the nave, adding two aisles, and a broach tower with spire, at a cost of £3,200, the Church was consecrated on August 6th, 1869, by Archbishop Thomson. Near the choir stalls is a plate with the inscription: "To the glory of God and in memory of the Rev. Thomas Smith, for thirty-two years vicar of this parish, who died on March 10th, 1901, these stalls and pulpit were erected by his parishioners and personal friends." Near to the Church are extensive schools and parochial buildings. St Saviour's Church, Whitehouse Road, with 320 sittings, consecrated by Archbishop Lang in March, 1913, as a Chapel of Ease to St. Mary's, cost £4,150. In the Rivelin Valley is the Church Cemetery of seven acres. Population, 15,276. Patrons, trustees. Value £550. Vicar, the Rev. Thomas Michael Archer, M.A. St. JOHN THE BAPTIST, OWLERTON, built at a cost of £6,300, of which £2,000 was provided by a legacy from Miss Rawson, was consecrated by Archbishop Thomson on July 29th, 1874. It consists of nave, aisles and chancel, with a slender bell tower, and contains 600 sittings. In it are several stained memorial windows. A fine Parish War Memorial Hall, erected at a cost of £5,000, was opened in 1926. Population, 15,297. Patrons, the Church Patronage Society. Value £400. Vicar, the Rev. Harry Holden, M.A. St. BARTHOLOMEW'S, LANGSETT ROAD, comprising nave, chancel and aisles, with 640 sittings, was consecrated by Archbishop Thomson, on February 6th, 1882. The cost, including site, was about £5,000. In the Chancel is a memorial tablet to Benjamin Brandreth Slater, the first vicar. The parochial buildings and schools on Primrose Hill were built in 1890 at a cost of £2,000. Population, 10,790. Patrons, the Church Patronage Society. Value £400. Vicar, the Rev. William Retallack Bellerby. St. NATHANAEL'S, CROOKESMOOR, mainly due to the late Canon J.W. Merryweather, vicar of St. Philip's, a stone building consisting of nave only, is 100 feet long and 30 feet wide. Built at a cost of £6,000, it was a Chapel of Ease to St. Philip's and served by its clergy up to 1912, when the parish was constituted. The Church was consecrated by Bishop Hedley Burrows, on December 20th, 1914. The Parochial Hall is near the Church. Population 4,475. Patrons, the Sheffield Church Burgesses. Value £425. Vicar, the Rev. Samson Richard Butterton. INCUMBENTS AND VICARS WILLIAM DRAYTON CARTER, M.A., was, in December 1827, appointed by Dr. Sutton as the first minister of St. Philip's, but nothing is recorded of him. As his successor was appointed before the Church was consecrated it is probable that he did not enter upon the charge. THOMAS DINHAM ATKINSON, M.A., a former fellow of Queen's College, Cambridge, became incumbent in June, 1828. After a short ministry of three years he resigned in July, 1831 on his preferment to the vicarage of Rugeley, Staffordshire. JOHN LIVESEY M.A., of St. John's College, Cambridge, curate to the Rev. Charles Simeon, was appointed incumbent in July, 1831, and held the office for the long space of thirty-nine years. He was a tall man of fine presence, very active, and, as his after eventful ministry proved, a man of war. I well remember, in my early years, going to see him at his pleasant home in Wadsley Grove on some legal business. St. Philip's parish then included the districts of Hill Foot, Owlerton, Walkley and Upperthorpe in addition to a large district near the Church, with a total population of 25,000. The Church has become the mother church of four other distinct parishes, namely, St. Mary's, Walkley; St. John the Baptist, Owlerton; St. Bartholomew's, Langsett Road; and St. Nathanael, Crookesmoor. Of these, Walkley was founded by Mr. Livesey, he having secured the site in Howard Road, and raised £1,000 by subscription for a Mission Church, which now forms part of St. Mary's Church. In June, 1862, there was great excitement, accompanied with rioting, at Wardsend Cemetery, in consequence of reports that bodies had been sold for dissection by the sexton, whose house was burnt down. Mr. Livesey, who had at his own cost purchased and laid out the cemetery, unhappily became mixed up in the prosecutions that followed. Charged with giving a false certificate of burial, he was committed for trial at York Assizes, and sentenced to three weeks imprisonment. Resolutions of sympathy were passed, and in August a free pardon was granted to him. He successfully asserted in the Court of Queen's Bench the rights of the incumbents of the district Churches to the fees arising from marriages as against the Vicar of Sheffield; at another time he had a warm controversy with the War Office on the question of the chaplaincy to the Barracks. He died on 11th August, 1870, in his sixty-seventh year. Mr. Livesey introduced into St. Philip's Church what were known as "Cathedral Services," with a surpliced choir. The following notes are from an article by a Sheffield journalist, "Criticus," who was present at a service on a Sunday morning in 1869: There was the choir at the top of the centre aisle, and there were the choristers, ten nice little boys in white surplices, five on each side, and six men, all in surplices. the singing and chanting were unquestionably good. There was nothing higgity-jiggity about the tunes, anthems, or music. The congregation did not join in the response very extensively........ The service was conducted by Mr. Livesey, whose style of reading is easy, fluent, rather rapid and somewhat familiar. In the pulpit he wore his academic gown, having never worn his surplice when preaching since 1847, when his wardens presented him with an address, thanking him for giving it up. The text was four words, "Enoch walked with God," and the sermon occupied sixteen minutes. In private life Mr. Livesey is a very worthy and estimable character. he is genial, benevolent and kind hearted. he has a just and enlightened apprehension as to what is due to his position as incumbent or vicar of St. Philip's, and has on several occasions sacrificed himself to uphold great principles. Like Job, Mr. Livesey has had to "endure affliction," and, as in the case of that patriarch, his "latter end" yields a redundant return of peace and plenty. Sitting under his own vine and figtree in the pleasant retreat of Wadsley Grove, none daring to make him afraid, he rejoices in the esteem o! f his friends and parishioners. JAMES RUSSELL, M.A., formerly vicar of Wombridge, who died on January 12th, 1882, in his fifty-second year. He was a diligent pastor and an active promoter of parochial organizations. He was instrumental in the building of St. John's Church, Owlerton, and lived to see a further division of the parish, St. Bartholomew's, Langsett Road, the Church of which was consecrated shortly after his death. "In general Church work he was wont to take a leading share, displaying great business capacity along with religious zeal, and lived to see one of the largest congregations in the town at the evening services at St. Philip's." JOHN DARBYSHIRE, M.A., vicar of St. Paul's, Wolverhampton, was appointed vicar in 1882. Here is a characteristic letter from Archdeacon Blakeney the patron to the wardens of St. Philip's, on the appointment of Mr. Darbyshire, who was his brother-in-law: "I have much pleasure in informing you that the Rev. J. Darbyshire, vicar of St. Paul's, Wolverhampton, has accepted the living of St. Philip's. I believe you will find him all that you could desire. In making this appointment I have been solely guided by the requirements of the parish, and I pray that the divine blessing may accompany it in the extension of the Redeemer's Kingdom." Mr. Darbyshire was a genial and earnest pastor, highly esteemed by his parishioners and a wide circle of friends. In 1898 he became vicar of Doulting, Somerset, where he died on December 22nd, 1919, at the age of seventy-two. JAMES WHITE MERRYWEATHER, M.A., vicar of Carbrook, Sheffield, who for twenty-three years had been vicar of Carbrook, Sheffield, was appointed vicar in 1898. To him was mainly due the Church of St. Nathanael, Crookesmoor, a daughter Church of St. Philip's. He remained at St. Philip's until 1912, when he became vicar of Fulwood, where, after much suffering, he died on May 6th, 1916, at the age of seventy. He was a faithful minister, an able and fearless preacher of the gospel, a diligent bible student, a zealous educationalist, and an uncompromising protestant. He was canon of Sheffield Cathedral. ERNEST VORES EVERARD, M.A., vicar of St. James', Sheffield, was, in 1912, appointed to St. Philip's. "He was a liberal Evangelical in his views and methods, and had a straightforward, breezy style, and an unruffled geniality, which gained him popularity wherever he went. He was a hard worker, and could sing and play the piano well. Some people knew him as the 'singing parson.' " He died with startling suddenness on January 14th, 1917, at Newcastle, as he rose to address a gathering of soldiers. HENRY CECIL, A.K.C., curate of the Cathedral Church, was in 1917 appointed to the vicarage of St. Philip, where he remained until 1926, when he was preferred to that of St. Barnabas, Sheffield. ERNEST WILLIAM SELWYN, M.A., of Queens' College, Cambridge, and Ridley hall, curate of St. George's, the present vicar, was appointed in 1926. ASSISTANT CURATES 1836-1838 G.M. CARRICK 1839-1844 JOHN GWYTHER 1850-1851 G. EASTMAN 1852-1855 A.B. WHALTON 1855-1860 J.F. WRIGHT 1861-1862 WILLIAM MARSHALL, became rector of St. Paul's, Manchester, 1871 1863-1867 C. SISUM WRIGHT, vicar of St. Silas', Sheffield, 1869-78; vicar of Doncaster, 1878-1903; .................. Canon of York, died 1903. 1866-1870 CRESWELL ROBERTS, left in 1870 for Marston Magna, Somerset. 1867-1870 H.J. BARTON, formerly a missionary in India. 1871-1874 W.G. FERRY, deceased. 1875-1897 C.R. KILLICK, vicar of Holy Trinity, Runcorn, 1897-1923, retired. 1878-1882 C.J. PARMINTER, deceased. 1880-1881 J.P. CORT, vicar of Sale, Cheshire, deceased. 1882-1892 J. TURTON PARKIN, vicar of Wadsley, 1894-1902, died 1902. 1898-1899 S.R. ANDERSON, now incumbent of Lisnaskea, Co. Fermanagh. 1899-1911 T. COWPE LAWSON, now vicar of Castle Bytham, Grantham. 1899-1906 P.H. FEARNLEY, now vicar of St. Luke's, Formby, Liverpool. 1906-1909 R.N. DEWE, now vicar of Balne, near Snaith. 1911-1912 S.R. BUTTERTON, now vicar of St. Nathanael's, Sheffield. 1913-1915 T. STANTON, now vicar of St. Matthew's, Wolverhampton. 1915-1917 T.H. PRIESTNALL, now vicar of Whittle-le-Woods, Chorley. 1917-1919 F.L. PEDLEY, now vicar of St. Oswald's, Little Horton. 1921-1923 H. CARD, now curate-in-charge of St. Hilda's Conventional District, Thurnscoe. 1924- J.M. BORROW THE SCRIPTURE READERS - Include the late Mr. W. Whitehead, who was a Reader for nearly forty years, Mr. Jackson, and Mr. Goddard who died in the Church when about to read the lesson. CHURCHWARDENS, 1828-1928 1828 ROBERT JOHNSON 1831 W.F.DIXON - J. WATSON 1832 W.F.DIXON - J. WATSON 1834 PAUL BRIGHT - JOHN JACKSON 1836 R. YEOMANS 1840-2 CHARLES F. YOUNGE - W.I. HORN 1841-2 H. WHEAT - W.I. HORN 1842-3 HENRY WHEAT - DANL. GREENWOOD 1843-5 DANL. GREENWOOD - Wm. BADGER 1847 JOSEPH WARNER - JAMES KIRKMAN 1848-59 Names not available 1860 EDWARD BROWN - FRED MAUNDER 1863-4 FRED MAUNDER - GARLAND 1868-9 R.W. MARSHALL - A. BUCKLE, B.A. 1870-3 J.L. COCKAYNE - EDWARD BROWN 1873-7 THOMAS BIGGIN - JOSEPH PICKERING 1877-80 EDWIN LEADBEATER - JOSEPH PICKERING 1880-1 EDWIN LEADBEATER - C.E. DICKINSON 1881-4 EDWIN LEADBEATER - H. ELLIOTT 1885-9 EDWIN LEADBEATER - W.H. BARNES 1889-91 EDWIN LEADBEATER - H. ELLIOTT 1891-2 C.E. DICKINSON - H. ELLIOTT 1892-3 JOHN SUTTON - CHARLES BURGON 1893-5 CHARLES BURGON - C.E. DICKINSON 1895-1900 W.P. KENYON - H. GREGORY 1900-3 W.P. KENYON - C.E. DICKINSON 1903-4 G. JOHNSON - C.E. DICKINSON 1904-11 C.E. DICKINSON - JOHN BARBER 1911-12 JOHN BARBER - E.B. WILKINSON 1912-13 J.W. ILIFFE - W. WILD 1913-14 E.B. WILKINSON - W. WILD 1914-15 H.B. JACKSON - W. WILD 1915-24 J.F. MITCHELL - W. WILD 1924-5 W. WILD - W.B. STATHER 1925-7 W. WILD - A. DIXON 1927-8 J.F. MITCHELL - A. DIXON ORGANISTS THOMAS FRITH, 1840-1843 F.J. LEESON, 1843-1845 J.E.NEWTON, 1845-1847 (possibly longer) GEORGE LEE, 1866-1877 SAMUEL SUCKLEY, 1877-1879 JOSEPH BEAUMONT, 1879-1903 E.L. MITCHELL, 1903-1915 Mr. ELLISS, 1916-1917 Mr. DYSON, 1917- IRVIN SENIOR, Mr. MILLINGTON, 1920- T, WILLIAMS, 1920-1923 J.T. WATSON, 1923-1928 CHURCHWARDEN'S ACCOUNTS On going through a bundle of old Churchwardens' accounts in the early years of St. Philip's I found many of much interest. Here is one wholly in Montgomery's handwriting. After an item for printing 5,000 hymns and prayers for foundation laying at St. George's, at 2/- per 100, £5, follow those relating to St. Philip's: March 19th, 1822, advertising contracts wanted for new Church of St. Philip's 10/2. September 24th, dinner on laying foundation of St. Philip's Church 7/-. Ditto, procession 11/6. Ditto, thanks to Freemasons 7/-. Printing 500 hymns ditto, 13/-. Other items bring the total to £10 12s. 2d. The account was paid by Mr. Rowland Hodgson, on September 22nd, 1826. Amongst other accounts are the following: July 1828, H.A. Bacon, 19, Angel Street, printer and publisher of the Sheffield Independent, for advt. opening of the Church, etc. 15/6. March 1828, to George Ridge, printer, Stamp Office and Mercury Office, King Street, £3 10s. for printing tickets, receipts, and 2,000 bills "pews to let." July 1828, to John Blackwell, the Sheffield Iris, £1 12s. for advertising consecration and sermons. July 1828, to J.C. Platt & Co., printers and booksellers, Courant Newspaper Office, 6, Haymarket 16/-, advt. "pews to let." August 1833, to Porter and Taylor, 7, High Street, for communion wine, "one doz. very rich old port £1 18s." Others include payments to organists and singers, e.g.- January 1845, £20 to J.E. Newton "for one year's services as Organist." December 1843, £6 5s. to J.F. Leeson, "a quarter's salary as Organist." May 1833, 15s. to John South "for singing ten Sundays at St. Philip's Church." The sum of £11 14s. 11d. was paid to the Sheffield Gaslight Company for gas during 1842; and in 1845, £2 17s. 8d. to Joseph Scorthorne for "6 tons 17 cwt. of coal at 6/6 per ton." CHOIR RULES Here are rules made about 1834, "to be observed by the choir in order to promote the more regular attendance and to preserve the respectability of the choir of singers assembling at St. Philip's Church":- 1. That the time of practice shall commence at eight o'clock in the evening and conclude at nine, or a quarter past. 2. That on each night of meeting those not attending at eight o'clock shall forfeit a penny, and for non-attendance to ... forfeit twopence. 3. That the forfeits to be paid into the hand of the clerk, and the gross amount at the end of each year to be expended ... at a meeting of the choir in such manner as shall be agreed upon by the majority. 4. That on Sundays, if any of the choir are absent at the commencement of service, they shall each forfeit one penny; .... if absent half a day to forfeit threepence each, and if the whole day to forfeit sixpence each. 5. That sickness only shall be cause of exemption from the above forfeits. 6. That the clerk is requested to keep a book in which he will enter the attendance and forfeitures respectively. These rules agreed to, and signed by Paul Bright and John Jackson, Churchwardens, James Lee, William Horsfield, Wm. Lee, George Gill, Wm. Whitehead, Sarah Heald, Elizabeth France, and Mary Ann Smith. THE INFIRMARY Almost opposite to St. Philip's Church are the extensive buildings of the Royal Infirmary (formerly called the General Infirmary). The first block was built in 1797. It was on part of the Infirmary estate, which had been acquired in exchange by Mr. Philip Gell, that St. Philip's Church was erected. In September, 1849, a sermon in aid of the Infirmary was preached in the Church by Dr. Musgrave, Archbishop of York, the collection amounting to £92 10s. The Infirmary now contains 500 beds, and in 1927 had 6,237 in-patients, 22,727 out-patients; in addition to which 20,213 accidents and emergencies were treated. The chaplaincy was for many years held by the vicars of Walkley, but in 1927 the present vicar of St. Philip's was appointed that post. THE BARRACKS The Sheffield Barracks, amongst the finest in the kingdom, standing on 25 acres of land, and fronting Langsett Road, completed in 1850 in place of the old barracks were then in St. Philip's parish. Before the garrison Church was built the officers and soldiers used to march with their band to St. Philip's Church every Sunday, when the Church was usually full. Here is a story of those days. Mr. Robert Jobson, one of the founders of the stove-grate works at Roscoe Place, near to St. Philip's, was a regular attendant at the Church. It is said that he was the last Sheffielder to adhere to the old fashion of wearing his hair in a pigtail or queue. One Sunday as he sat in his pew, he became conscious of some movement behind him, and detected an officer of the 3rd Light Dragoons in the pew behind, pretending to cut the pigtail by moving his first and second fingers as if they were scissors. Mr. Jobson said nothing, but the next day called at the barracks, and interviewed the commander, Lord Robert Manners. The military joker got a good wigging, and made an ample apology, accompanied by a contribution of £5 to the Infirmary. In January 1834, the wardens of St. Philip's received from the War Office a letter enclosing thirty shillings as an annual subscription from the War Department for Church expenses, in addition to the rent of the pew occupied by the officers. THE GREAT FLOOD St. Philip's parish suffered severely in the terrible flood of 12th March, 1864, which involved the loss of 240 lives, the flooding of 4,000 houses, and immense destruction of property. I well remember some of the sad scenes I witnessed at that time. The lower side of the parish from Hillsborough to Shales Moor, felt the full force of the flood. The waters touched the walls of the churchyard, and amongst those who perished were a large number of residents in the parish. The Rev. Charles Sisum Wright, afterwards vicar of St. Silas, Sheffield, and subsequently vicar of Doncaster, was curate of St. Philip's, and lived at Philadelphia House near the Don. He related how the flood rose considerably above his garden wall which was eight feet high. When day dawned the garden was covered with a thick layer of mud in which was embedded a horse, which the flood had carried from its stable over the garden wall. It had on its halter to which a heavy stone was attached. Although much exha! usted it ultimately recovered. *************************** Such is the story of St. Philip's, its beginnings, growth, and work, during the first hundred years of its existence. it has filled a large niche in the history of our city. What of its future ? This, under God, depends in great measure upon the earnest, prayerful, and self sacrificing efforts of its workers and worshippers. As we survey the past with its many changes, we may look to the unknown future with unabated confidence and hope. We live in a new age, an age of opportunity, when the Church of God is confronted with new forces, faced with new and difficult problems, and called upon to make new sacrifices. Amid greatly changed conditions and with special needs, the Clergy, Wardens and Council of St. Philip's boldly, and not without confidence, ask for a Centenary Birthday Gift of £2000. The sum of £1,000 is desired for new choir stalls and communion rails, new chancel pavement, and a new reredos worthy of the fine Church at a cost of £425, of which £100 is yet required. £200 is needed for extensive repairs to the roof, pointing of the stone work, and new fall-pipes, already partly carried out. £250 is needed for renovating and decorating the interior of the Church, besides which a considerable sum is wanted for the improvement of the organ including pneumatic action and an electric blower. To meet all these needs, most of which are urgent, self-sacrifice and generous gifts are called for. May St. Philip's long continue to be a burning and a shining light amid the thousands of busy workers by whom it is surrounded, and also a faithful witness to the Truth of the Eternal Gospel of the Grace of God as revealed by the great Head of the Church, our Lord Jesus Christ, Who is the "same yesterday, and to-day, and for ever." THY KINGDOM COME Composed by James Montgomery, for St. Philip's Bazaar, May 1850 Send out thy light and truth, O God ! With sound of trumpet from above ; Break not the nations with Thy rod, But draw them as with cords of love : Justice and mercy meet. Thy work is well begun, Through every clime, their feet, Who bring salvation, run ; In Earth as Heaven, Thy will be done Before Thee every idol fall, Rend the false Prophet's vail of lies ; The fullness of the Gentiles call, Be Israel saved, let Jacob rise ; Thy Kingdom come indeed, Thy Church with union bless, All scripture be her creed, And every tongue confess One Lord - the Lord of Righteousness. Now for the travail of His soul, Messiah's peaceful reign advance ; From sun to sun, from pole to pole, He claims His pledged inheritance ; O Thou Most Mighty ! gird Thy sword upon Thy thigh, That two-edged sword, thy Word, By which Thy foes shall die, Then spring, new-born, beneath Thine eye. So perish all Thine enemies ; Their enmity alone be slain ; Them, in the arms of mercy seize, Breathe, and their souls shall come again : So, may Thy friends at length, Oft smitten, oft laid low, Forth, like the Sun in strength, Conquering to conquer go : Till to Thy throne all nations flow. ST. PHILIP'S CHURCH, SHEFFIELD, 1928. HOURS OF SERVICE SUNDAYS --- Morning Service at 11: Evening Service at 6-30. Holy Communion at 8 a.m. every Sunday; 11a.m. 1st and 3rd Sundays, and 7-45 p.m. 4th Sunday. Children's Service at 2-45 p.m. 1st Sunday. WEDNESDAYS --- Holy Communion at 7-30 a.m. Intercessions and Address at 7-45 p.m. SAINTS DAYS --- Holy Communion at 7-30 a.m. Holy Baptism and Churchings: Sundays, 4 p.m. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Marriages: By arrangement any weekday. CLERGY: The Rev. E.W. SELWYN, M.A., Vicar, the Vicarage, 104, Upperthorpe. The Rev. J.M. BORROW, A.K.C., 43 Oakland Road, Hillsboro'. Hon. Diocesan Reader---Dr. H. Caiger, F.R.C.S., 79, Upper Hanover Street. Lady Worker---Miss C. Goddard. Organist & Choirmaster---Mr. J.T. Watson, 32, Conduit Road. Churchwardens---Mr. J.F. Mitchell and Mr. A. Dixon. Parochial Church Council---Secretary, Mr. E. Cook, 75, Wynyard Road; Treasurer, Mr. A. Lofthouse, 85, Meadow Street. Verger Mr. W.C.H. Wood, 34, Matthew Street. Sunday Schools, Hoyle Street and in the Church. Bible Classes for Young Men and Young Women, Eversley House. Day Schools, Hoyle Street---Headmaster (Mixed Dept.) Mr. M. Green, 278, Granville Road. Headmistress (Infants' Dept.) Miss Thompson, 105, Burngreave Road. EVERSLEY HOUSE. Clubs for Men and Girls, etc. Other Parochial Organisations include the Church of England Men's Society, the Mothers' Union, Girls' Friendly Society, Women's Fellowship, Boy Scouts and Wolf Cubs, Girl Guides and Brownies, Children's Church, Band of Hope, Football Club, Church Missionary Society Branch, Church Pastorial Aid Society Branch. Centenary Commemoration Services. During June a Crusade was conducted by past Curates of St. Philip's, who preached each Sunday and held Open-air Services. BIRTHDAY WEEK. Sunday, July 1st, 11 a.m., The Ven. the Archdeacon of Sheffield. The Master Cutler (Percy Lee, Esq.) will attend. 6-30 p.m., Canon F.G. Scovell. The Lord Mayor of Sheffield will attend. Monday, July 2nd, 8 p.m., Canon Trevor Lewis. Sunday, July 8th, 11 a.m., The Lord Bishop of Sheffield. Special R.A.O.B. Parade. 6-30 p.m., Rev. E.W. Selwyn, Vicar. GARDEN FETE On Saturday, June 30th, 8 to 10 p.m. at Banner Cross Hall, Ecclesall, (by kind permission of David Flather, Esq.) Opener, Mrs. J.W. Fawcett, Chairman, Samuel Osborn, Esq. A BAZAAR, will be held in the Cutlers' Hall, on October 18th, 19th and 20th, 1928. Credits Source - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~engsheffield/ Please visit the site linked - it's excellent and has many interesting articles on Sheffield and it's historical past !
  8. Here's a list of Sheffield streets, roads and places pre 20th Century LIST OF STREETS IN SHEFFIELD circa 1700 Balm Green Broad Lane Bull Stake Campo Lane Castle Fold Castle Green Castle Green Head Castle Hill Church Lane Far Gate Fig Tree Lane or New Street Hartshead High Street Holling Lane or Blind lane - later Holly Street Irish Cross Mill Sands New Hall Street Pinfold Lane Ratten Row Redcroft Scargill Croft Snig Hill The Isle The Underwater Townhead Street Waingate Water Lane West Bar West Bar Green IN 1821, Ainley yard, 72, Newfield Albion row, Broad lane end Albion square, 20, Solly street Allen Street, Gibraltar street Allen yard, 13, Smithfield Allot's yard, 18, Porter lane Alpha cottages, Highfield Alsop row, 5, Porter lane Andrew street, Wicker Andrew's yard, 29, Furnace hill Angel street, Market place Appleyard's yard, 21, Furnace hill Armitage yard, 13, Gaol street Arundel street, Norfolk street Arundel lane, Arundel street Backfields, Division street Back lane, Division street Back lane, 18, Wicker Back lane, Rockingham street Back broad street, Park Bacon island, near Hillfoot Badger's row, 25, Portobello Bailey lane, Trippet lane Bailey street, Trippet lane Baker's hill, Market street Baker's yard, 36 Peacroft Bail yard, 56 Pond street Ball yard, 1, Young street Balm Green, Bailey street Bank street, Angel street Barber's court, 20, Radford street Barber nook, Crooks moor Barker's yard, Backfields Barlow's yard, Broad street, Park Barnet street, Snowhill Barns yard, 12, Cross Smithfield Barracks, Pennistone road Barrel yard, 17, Little Pond street Barrel yard, 15, Edward street Barrett's yard, 14, Allen street Bates square Top of Westbar green Bath yard, Philadelphia Batty's yard, Dyer's bridge Batty's yard, 22, Furnace hill Batty's yard, 17, Young street Beach's yard, 1, Solly street Bealey's yard, t2, Young street Bealey's yard, 37, Hereford street Beal's yard, 43, Solly street Beardshaw's court, 39, Allen street Beardshaw's yard, Allen street Beast market, Wicker Beaver's Buildings, 2, Pye bank Beet street, Broad lane Belk's court, 60, Scotland Street Bell's square, Trippet lane Bennett's court, 12, Radford street Bennett's lane, Forge lane Bingham's yard, 35, Radford street Bingham's yard, 10, Young street Birkenshaw's yard, 11, Orchard street Birtle's yard, 1, Young street Bishop street, Tudor street Black Swan yard, 7, Burgess street Black Swan yard, 3, Fargate Blast lane, Canal bridge Blank street, Wicker Blue bell yard, 43, High street Boot yard, Redhill Boot and Shoe yard, Pinstone street Bower spring, Westbar green Bower street, Spring street Bower's buildings, 27, Pye bank Bower's yard, 33, Nursery Bowling green street, Gibraltar street Bradley's yard, 5, Hollis croft Bradow row, 83 Rockingham street Bradwall row, Baley lane Brammall lane, Bennett's wheel Brick pond side, Broad lane Brick yard, 20, Green street Bridgefield, Barnsley road Bridge houses, near iron bridge, Nursery Bridge Inn yard, Bridgehouses Bridge street, Lady bridge Brightmore's yard, 6, Garden street Brightmore's yard, Church street Bright street, South street Bright's row, Hawley croft Bright's yard, Lee croft Britannia place, 41, Garden street Broad lane, Townhead street Broad lane end, Tenter street Broad street lane, Broad Street Broad street, Park Brocco street, Solly street Brook hill, head of Broad lane Brook's open, 20, Nursery Broomhall lane mill, Shemeld's croft Broomhead square, Park hill Broomhead yard, 39, Hoyle street Brown Cow yard, 7, Brighouse hill Browne street, End of Pond street Brown's yard, 106, Eyre street Bunting's yard, Hereford street Burdekin's yard, Bridgehouses Burgess street, Balm green Burgess Yard, 44, Pond street Burgin's Yard, 6, Harvest lane Burton bridge gardens, Pond street Button lane, Foot of Carver street Buxton's yard, 8, Copper street Cabbage alley, Cheney square Cadman's court, 13, Fargate Cadman's yard, 67, Eyre lane Calver square, Duke street Campo lane, Hartshead Canton place, Upperthorpe Carpenter street, near Iron bridge Carr's yard, 24, Smithfield Carr's yard, 68, Newfield Carver lane, Division street Carver street, West street Castle folds, Castle hill Castle green, Castle street Castle hill, Bottom of Hay market Castle street, Foot of Angel street Caton square, 33, Nursery Cayley's yard, 45, Garden street Centre fields, Infirmary road Change alley, 29, Fruit market Chapel lane, 23, Chapel street Chapel street, Bridgehouses Chapel walk, 5, Fargate Chapman's yard, Redhill Charles lane, back of Charles street Charles street, Union street Cheney row, Norfolk street Cheney square, New church street Cherry tree yard, Gibraltar street Church street, top of High street Clay hole, 78, Bridgehouses Clayton's row, 20, Wicker Cliff's yard, 3, High street Cloth houses, 10, Gaol street Clough hill, near Clough o ugh wheel Club, yard, Mill sands Club mill yard, 20, Smithfield Coaldwell's yard, 54 Porter lane Coal pit lane, Balm green Colley's yard, 28, Lambert Street Colliers row, Mansfield row, Park Copley's yard, 88, Broad lane Copley's yard, 6, Portobello Copper street, Gibraltar street Corn hill, Sully street Corn market, Market place Cotton mill bridge, Cotton mill lane Cotton mill lane, Longcroft Cotton mill row, Cotton mill lane Cotton mill walk, Cotton mill lane Cotton street, end of Bridge street Coulson croft Coulson street Coulson street, Westbar Cranshaw's court, Shales moor Cranshaw's yard, Green lane Crawshaw's yard, 39, High street Creswick square, 24, Pond hill Cricket Inn lane, Snowhill, Park Crooks croft Hospital walk Crooks moor, end of Broadlane Crook's yard, 43, Hollis croft Crosland square, 72, Allen street Crossland yard, Broad street, Park Cross Burgess street, Burgess street Cross Keys yard, 4, Shade hill Crossland's yard, 81, Allen street Cross Orchard street, Orchard street Cross Smithfield, Smithfield Cross street, 12, Chapel street Crown alley, Duke street, Park Cumberland street, South street Cupola street, 21, Gibraltar street Daisy walk, 52, Allen street Daniel hill, Upperthorpe Davy's yard, 74, Bridgehouses Dawson's yard, Snow lane Dearman's yard, Trippet lane Denton's yard, 3, Chapel street Dewsnap's yard, 5, Furnace hill Dickenson's yard, Cotton mill lane Division street, Carver street Dixon's lane, Hay market Drury's houses, 30, Gaol Street Duke's lane, back of Duke street Duke street, Broad street Duke street, South street Dunfields, Shales moor Dunfield's court, Dunfields Dun wheel, Cotton mill walk Dungworth's yard, 18, Cumberland street Dyer's bridge, Pond hill Dyer's yard, Wicker Eadon's yard, 43, Peacroft Earl street, South street East bank, Pond street East parade, Church yard Edward Street, Scotland street Eel's houses, 56, Rockingham street Elliott's yard, 14, Furnace hill Emmett's court, New street, Park Emsworth's court, 6, Radford street Emsworth's court, 33, Radford street Emsworth's yard, 8, Radford street Ethcate yard, 13, Edward street Eyre lane, bottom of Surrey street Eyre square, Wicker Lyre street, Surrey street Eyre's yard, 28, Fargate Fanshaw's yard, 99, Eyre lane Fargate, 25, High street Favell's yard, 78, Fargate Favell's yard, 70, Spring street Field's yard, near Hillfoot Fig tree lane, 12, Bank street Fire brick yard, Wicker Fisher's court, Bridge street Fisher's yard, 34, Smithfield Fish market, King street Flat street, near Market street Flint well, Balm green Flockton's houses, near Allen street Flockton's row, 66, Rockingham street Flockton's yard, 7, Jessop street Flockton's yard, 26, Division street Forge lane, 20, Cumberland street Forge lane, Shudehill Foundry lane, Duke street Francis Yard, 29, Peacroft Frith's court, Snig hill Froggatt's yard, Wicker Fruit market, near Haymarket Furnace hill, Westbar green Furnace yard, 24, Scotland street Furnace yard, High street, Park Furnace yard, Garden street Furnace yard, 50, Nursery Furnace hill, Nursery Furniss yard, 40, Eyre lane Furnival street, end of Union street Gaol street, South street Garden square, 90, Broad lane Garden street, Broad lane end Gate yard, Coal pit lane Gell street, Portobello street George street, High street Gibraltar street, Westbar green Gill's yard, 6, Chapel street Glave's yard, 86, Peacroft Gooden's Yard, 8, Bright street Goodlad's houses, near Allen street Grayson's yard, 62, Newfield Grayson's yard, 19, Scotland street Greaves yard, Pond street Greaves yard, 47, Harvest lane Greaves yard, 11, Gibraltar street Green lane, near Roscoe place Green lane, 28, Pye bank Green Man yard, Broad street, Park Green street, Gaol street Greenwood's yard, 42, Nursery Grindlegate, Tenter street Grove houses, Hill top Hadfield's Court, 6, Love street Hadfield's row, 9, Gaol street Hadfield square, 8, Gaol street Halbert square, 3, Spring street Hallamgate, near Reservoir Hallatt's yard, 20, Nursery Hallcar place. Wicker Hall's Yard, 56, Sully street Hall's yard, 19, Orchard street Haly bank, Highfield Hammond's yard, 95, Pond street Hammond's yard, Trinity street Hancock's yard, 60, Hollis croft Hanson's square, Walker street Hardy's Yard, Cotton mill lane Harmer lane, Pond street Hartram's yard, 31, Sully street Hartshead, Watson's walk Harvest lane, Bridgehouses Hattersley's yard, 11, Bright street Haukridge yard, Duke street, Park Hawksworth's yard, 34, High street Hawley croft, Campo lane Hawley's yard, 41, Jessop street Haymarket, Market place Haymarket lane, Haymarket Headford court, Headford Street Headford street, Young street Hereford lane, 13, Cumberland street Hereford Street, South street Hibberson's yard, 12, Sycamore street Hick's lane, West bar Highfield, Little Sheffield High house, Pennistone road High street, Market place High street, Broad street, Park Hill foot, Pennistone road Hill's court, 65, Broad lane Hill's court, 53, Wicker Hill's yard, 54, Nursery Hill's yard, 59, Wicker Hill's yard, 32, Young street Hobson's court, 8, New church street Hobson's yard, 86, Duke street, Park Hodgson's court, Little Sheffield Hodgson's yard, 2½, Pond hill Holbert's yard, 21, Trinity street Holdsworth's row, 9, Shales moor Holdsworth's yard, 15, Jessop street Hollis croft, Broad lane end Holly street, Balm green Hop yard, Clough wheel Horrax yard 79, Fargate Hospital walk, near Sheaf bridge Howard lane, Pond street Howard street, Norfolk street Howden's yard, ½4, Hollis croft Hoyland's yard, 16, Peacroft Hoyle street, 29, Shales moor Hudson's yard, 34, Harvest lane Hughes yard, 36, Smithfield Hughes yard, Lambert street Infirmary lane, Shales moor Isle, Bridge street Jehu Lane, Haymarket Jenkinson's yard, Bailey lane Jepson's yard, 25, Edward street Jerico, Allen street Jessop street, South street Jessop's yard, Carver street Johnson street, 29, Nursery Joiner street, 39, Nursery Jones's yard, King street Keaton's square, Wicker Kilham island, Dun wheel King street, Angel street King's Arms yard, 42, Fargate King and Miller court, 79. Norfolk street Kirby court, 6, Steelhouse lane Kirby lane, High street Kirby lane, Park street Kirby's yard, 21, Cross Smithfield Lambert's croft, Westbar green Lambert street, Trinity street Lambert's yard. Pye bank Law's yard, Hollis croft Leavey greave, near Brook hill Lee croft, Campo lane Lee lane, Brightside Lindley's yard, Newfield Lindsley's yard, Copper street Little Pond street, Shude hill Little Sheffield, bottom of South street Littlewood's yard, 9, Sycamore street Long croft, Dunfields Lord's yard, 29, Trinity street Love at, eel, Spring street Low street, South street, Park Machan's yard, 50, Harvest lane Maiden's row, 27, Duke street Mansfield road, Duke street, Park Market place, bottom of High street Market street, Fruit market Marple's yard, Hollis croft Marple's yard, Solly street Marshall's yard, 80, Rockingham street Marshfield, 32, Portobello Martin's yard, 2½, Broad lane Matthew's yard, 28, Young street Mayer's yard, Duke street, Park Meadow bank, Pond street Meadow street, 10, Allen street Meeting lane, Bank street Milk street, Norfolk street Mill lane, Bridge street Mill lane court, 40, Bridge street Millsands, Bridge street Moorfields, Gibraltar street Moor street, Tudor street Morton's court, 3, Brick yd. Green street Morton's houses, Allen street Morton wheels, Philadelphia Moseley's court, 8, Townhead street Mulberry street, High street Nag's Head court, Haymarket Nag's Head yard, Haymarket Naylor's yard, Chapel street Naylor's yard, Solly street Neepsend, Harvest lane Nell's yard, Rock street Nelson's row, Wicker Nether hallam, Crooks moor Nether slack, Penistone road Netherthorpe, Allen street Newbould's court, 9, Young street New Church street, Norfolk street Newfield, near Iron bridge Newhall street, Snig hill Newhill, Sheffield moor Newmarket Street, Norfolk street New meadow street, Allen street New street, Bank street New street, Park New street, Queen street Newton's court, 32, West bar New town, Park Norfolk lane, Surrey street Norfolk row, 62, Norfolk street Norfolk Street, Market street Norrisfield, Love street North street, Queen street Nowell's yard, 52, Gaol street Nursery, Wicker Nursery lane, 15, Wicker Nursery row, 20, Nursery Nursery walk, Lady bridge Oakes houses, Duke street, Park Oborne street, Bridge houses Old Steam Engine yd. Crook's croft, Park Old street, Broad street, Park Onion's yard, 13, Porter lane Orange street, Broad lane Orchard lane, Orchard street Orchard lane, Park Orchard place, 12, Orchard street Orchard street, Church street Osborne's yard, 11, Smithfield Owen's yard, 44, High street Palfreyman's yard, 39, Newfield Paradise square, Campo lane Paradise street, Paradise square Parker's yard, West bar Parkgate, Broad street, Park Park hill, New street, Park Parkin's yard, Jehu lane Parkin's yard, 78, Peacroft Parrot yard, 110, Sheffield moor Parsonson yard, 16, Smithfield Paternoster row, Pond street Peace yard, 4, Smithfield Peacroft, Tenter street Penistone road, Moorfields Pepper alley, 25, Fargate Pheasant yard, Sheaf bridge Philadelphia place, Penistone road Pickle, Wicker Pinder's yard, 33, Arundel street Pinfold lane, Church street Pinstone street, Norfolk street Pitts moor, Bridge houses Plant's yard, Highfield Pond hill, Flat street Pond hill, Sheaf gardens Pond lane gardens, Dyers bridge Pond Street, Flat street Porter brook, Jessop street Porter lane, Porter street Porter street, Union street Port Macon, Meadow street Portobello, Rockingham street Potter's yard, 85, Eyre lane Prince of Wales yard, 1, Sycamore street Prince's yard, Edward street Prince's yard, Young street Providence row, Allen street Pye bank, Barnsley road Queen's Head yard, Castle street Queen street, Bank street Radford row, Townhead street Radford street, Mien street Ramsden's court, High street, Park Rawson's yard, 21, Harvest lane Rayner's yard, 4, Pond street Redcroft, Pinfold lane Redhill, Broad lane Red place, Solly street Robert's yard, Garden street Robinson a yard, 27, Meadow street Robinson's yard, 40, Harvest lane Rockingham lane, Garden street Rockingham place, Rockingham street Rockingham street, Broad lane Rock street, Chapel street Rodger's court, 3, Norfolk street Roscoe place, Hoyle street Rough bank, Park Rowarth's yard, 43, Charles street Royal Oak yard, 9, Pond street Royston's yard, 9, Young street Russel's yard, 20, Union lane Rutherforth's yard, 78, Broad lane Sambourn square, 7, Edward street Sands paviours, West street Sargent's buildings, Wicker Sargent's yard, Lee croft Saunder's square, New street, Park Saville street, Rotherham road Saxton's yard, 47, Gaol street Scantlebury's yard, 7, Copper street Scargill croft, 7, Bank street School street, Duke street, Park Scotland street, Westbar green Senior's row, 20, Spring street Shales moor, Moorfields Shales square, Duke street, Park Sharrow grange, Highfield Sharrow green, Highfield Sharrow Head, Highfield Sharrow lane, Highfield Sharrow moor, Highfield Sharrow mount, Highfield Shaw's yard, Meadow street Shaw's yard, 65, Newfield Sheaf gardens, the Banks Sheaf island, Pond street Sheaf street, Pond hill Sheard's yard, 14, Orchard street Sheffield moor, South street Sheldon's square, 24, Orchard street Sheldon's yard, Wicker Shemeld's croft, Forge lane Shepherd's yard, 14, Hollis croft Shepherd's yard, 14, Newfield Shepherd's yard, 26, Peacroft Shepherd's yard, 17, Solly street Sherley hill, Sharrow grange Shillitoe's yard, 72, Eyre lane Shouter's yard, 29, Waingate Shude hill, Baker's hill Siddall street, Broad lane Silcock's square, 16, Pond hilt Silver street, Westbar green Silver street head, Lee croft Simscroft, Townhead street Singleton's yard, 8, Chapel street Slack's yard, Allen street Sleigh's lane, 4, Carver street Sleigh's yard, Carver street Smith street, Scotland street Smith's yard, 10. Edward street Smith's yard, High street, Park Smith's yard, 14, Doily street Smith's yard, 35, Nursery Smith's yard, 27, Snow lane Smith's yard, Spring Street Smith's yard, West bar Smith's yard, 41, Wicker Snig hill, Angel street Snowhill, Broad street, Park Snowhill, Scotland street Solly street, Peacroft Souter's lane, Townhead street South street, Park South street, Sheffield moor Spinning street, Coulston croft Spitalfields, Wicker Spital hill, Pickle Spooner's yard, Tenter street Spring gardens, Thomas street Spring lane, Broomhall lane Spring street, Coulston street Spring street, Snig hill Stacey's yard, Furnace hill Stacey's yard, 35, Scotland street Stafford yard, Redhill Stag's Head court, Pinstone street Staley's yard, Rockingham street Staley's yard, 27, Young street Staniforth yard, Duke street, Park Stanley street, 1½, Wicker Steelbank, Crooks moor Steelhouse lane, 84, Westbar green Stephenson's yard, 77, Westbar green St. James' row, Church street Stone yard, George's street Stoney croft, near Iron bridge Styran's yard, 33, Broad lane Styring's court, 1, Cross Smithfield Surrey street, Norfolk street Swallow's yard, 21, Smith street Sycamore hill, Union lane Sycamore street, Arundel street Sykes field, 22, Porter lane Sykes square, Pinstone street Sykes yard, Church street Sylvester gardens, Porter brook Taylor's yard, 36, Harvest lane Taylor's yard, Millsands Taylor's yard, 10, Townhead street Taylor's yard, Trinity street Tenter street, Westbar green The Banks, near Clough wheel Thomas street, Broomhall lane Thornton square, 23, Green street Three Cranes yard, 18, Queen street Tilt yard, 50, Pond street Timm's yard, Lee croft Townhead cross, Townhead street Townhead street, Church street Trickett's yard, 47, Coalpit lane Trinity street, Gibraltar street Trippet lane, Pinfold lane Trippet yard, 37, High street Trough yard, 2, Whitecroft Tudor place, Tudor street Tudor street, Sycamore street Turner's yard, 22, Bright street Turner's yard, 31, Norfolk street Twelve o'Clock, End of Wicker Tyas yard, 56, Peacroft Tyas yard, 26, Meadow street Type lane, Nursery Union lane, Charles street Union street, Norfolk street Union yard, near Iron bridge Union yard, 60, Peacroft Upper Edward street, Edward street Upper meeting yard, 25, Fargate Upper slack, Penistone road Upperthorpe, Infirmary Vicar lane, Church street Vicker's yard, 30, Edward street Vicker's yard, 43, Garden street Vicker's yard, Hillfoot Waingate, Haymarket Wainwright's square, '23, Norfolk lane Wainwright's yard, 86, Eyre street Walk mill, Twelve o'Clock Walker street, 23, Wicker Walton's yard, Cornhill Warbleton's square, 18, Eyre lane Ward's court, 58, Scotland street Ward's square, 1, Duke street Warmbath yard, Green lane Water lane, Angel street Waterloo place, Green lane Water street, Spring street Watery lane, Roscoe place Watson's walk, Angel street Weaver's yard, Campo lane Weigh lane, Shales square Wellington street, Carver street Well's yard, 50, Coalpit lane Well's yard, 36, Newfield Well's yard, 87, Pond street West bar, Snig hill Westbar green, West bar West Don, Philadelphia place Western bank, Broad lane Westfield lane, Pinfold lane West lane, West street West street, Church street Wheatcroft row, 12, Chapel street Wheats' yard, 70, Carver street Whieldon street, Broad lane Whieldon's yard, Red hill White Bear yard, High street White Bear's walk, Norfolk street White croft, Tenter street Whitehead's yard, Hawley croft Whitehouse lane, Infirmary lane Whitelock's yard, 2, Long croft Wicker, Lady bridge Wicker lane, Nursery street Wigfold's yard, 2, Smithfield Wilkinson's court, 22, Meadow street Wilkinson's court, 16, Peacroft Wilkinson's street, Gell street Wilkinson's yard, 85, Duke at. Park Wilkinson's yard, 12, 14 & 27, Young st. Willey's square, 31, Nursery Willey street, Wicker Willey's yard, 61, Wicker Wilson's yard, 18, Haymarket Wilson's yard, 18, Orchard street Windle's yard, 2?, Lambert street Woodcock's row, 66, Eyre street Woodcock's yard, 24, Pond street Wood grove, Hill foot Woodhouse yard, 16, Young street Woodside, 12, Harvest lane Woolhouse yard, 11, Peacroft Woolhouse yard, Broad street, Park Woollen's yard, 28, Radford street Workhouse croft, Paradise square Workhouse lane, West bar Worstenholm's yard, Carver street Wright's houses, Providence row York street, 31, High street Young street, South street Young's yard, 11, Portobello
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