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RichardB

Hunters Gate Bar And Cows

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1832

Mr Wheatcroft, keeper of Hunter's Gate Bar, near Sheffield summoned George Bartholomew for having passed through his bar on the 25th July with seven cows and refused to pay toll for them.

The defendant claimed exemption under the 3rd Geo. III. which allows horses and other beasts to pass through, free of toll, in going to or from plough, harrow, or pasture if they do not go more than two miles on the same line of road.

The toll keeper contended that milch cows from which the farmer was receiving a profit were not the kind of beasts meant by "other beasts" in the Act.

The magistrate differed from him in this point and dismissed the summons.

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1832

Mr Wheatcroft, keeper of Hunter's Gate Bar, near Sheffield summoned George Bartholomew for having passed through his bar on the 25th July with seven cows and refused to pay toll for them.

The defendant claimed exemption under the 3rd Geo. III. which allows horses and other beasts to pass through, free of toll, in going to or from plough, harrow, or pasture if they do not go more than two miles on the same line of road.

The toll keeper contended that milch cows from which the farmer was receiving a profit were not the kind of beasts meant by "other beasts" in the Act.

The magistrate differed from him in this point and dismissed the summons.

Apparently it was a common practise in the Porter and Mayfield Valleys for cows to be taken into town to be milked rather than milked on the farm and the milk then taken into town. I guess it must have been fresher that way! I wonder if that was what Mr Bartholemew was doing?

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Remember that until the comming of the railways it was very common for cows to be kept in towns , indeed in London there were 1,000's of cows in what we would now call central london.

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