Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ukelele lady

Things Now Gone

Recommended Posts

DaveH

I can remember using pieces of lino/oilcloth inside my shoes,

it lasted a bit longer than cardboard before it started letting in water.

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnpO7lmbMGg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_GB"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnpO7lmbMGg?fs=1&amp;hl=en_GB" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

A 45rpm 7 inch single gramaphone record.

Now there's something else that's a "thing now gone" :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest davekowl

Remember segs that were hammered into the heel of your shoes when the heel was wearing down.

They were made of metal and were half moon shaped. they made your shoes a death trap to walk

in but it saved buying a new pair.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

Remember segs that were hammered into the heel of your shoes when the heel was wearing down.

They were made of metal and were half moon shaped. they made your shoes a death trap to walk

in but it saved buying a new pair.

BUT,

If you kick - scrapped them on the pavement you could make them spark for a bit of fun ;-)

Not exactly Fred Astaire but great for a few laughs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SteveHB

BUT,

If you kick - scrapped them on the pavement you could make them spark for a bit of fun ;-)

Not exactly Fred Astaire but great for a few laughs

They did make that distinctive 'click' sound as you walked,

something that I tried and they were neither use nor ornament, the Phillips Star screw on heels,

the screws always fell out :(

Note the different sizes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

They did make that distinctive 'click' sound as you walked,

something that I tried and they were neither use nor ornament, the Phillips Star screw on heels,

the screws always fell out :(

Note the different sizes

Segs, Star shoe heels..

Now with proper taps that do make a distinctive click you could do this...

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxPgplMujzQ?fs=1&amp;hl=en_GB"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxPgplMujzQ?fs=1&amp;hl=en_GB" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hilldweller

Remember segs that were hammered into the heel of your shoes when the heel was wearing down.

They were made of metal and were half moon shaped. they made your shoes a death trap to walk

in but it saved buying a new pair.

Talking of Segs, it reminded me of a prank I once played on a senior engineer at Stocksbridge Works.

He was responsible for all the transistor equivalent and characteristics reference books. He guarded these like gold ingots and would insist upon supplying the information himself.

One day I came across a very small Seg with 3 integrated nails and thought to myself how like a epoxy encapsulated transistor it looked. It was marked SEG1 on the top.

I placed three tiny bits of pvc sleeving on the legs and inserted short bits of tinned copper wire in the ends of the sleeving. It then looked exactly like a transistor.

I took it to the engineer and asked him if he could find me an equivalent for a SEG1.

After three days he sent it back to me with a message that he'd looked through all his books but couldn't find a reference.

I was young and daft in those days, now I'm old and dafter. :) :) :)

HD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hilldweller

ok

Do we AWL agree then

Old Yorkshire saying.

Never have anything to do with owt with a wooden handle, there's bound to be work involved. :)

HD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest skeets

Who knows what this object was used for then?

Hi Steve it's a wick dispenser is it not

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SteveHB

Hi Steve it's a wick dispenser is it not

Hello,

it is a wick 'cleaner' skeets,

Markbaby added an answer + a link in post # 08.

Click here for - The Answer

Sorry Steve, but one of your photos does say what it is!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

Talking of Segs, it reminded me of a prank I once played on a senior engineer at Stocksbridge Works.

He was responsible for all the transistor equivalent and characteristics reference books. He guarded these like gold ingots and would insist upon supplying the information himself.

One day I came across a very small Seg with 3 integrated nails and thought to myself how like a epoxy encapsulated transistor it looked. It was marked SEG1 on the top.

I placed three tiny bits of pvc sleeving on the legs and inserted short bits of tinned copper wire in the ends of the sleeving. It then looked exactly like a transistor.

I took it to the engineer and asked him if he could find me an equivalent for a SEG1.

After three days he sent it back to me with a message that he'd looked through all his books but couldn't find a reference.

I was young and daft in those days, now I'm old and dafter. :) :) :)

HD

What a brilliant prank that was HD. ;-)

Passing off a 3 stud seg marked SEG1 as an equivalent semiconductor to an OC71

It's the sort of trick me and Stuart would have thought in our youger days

What a pity that SEG1 doesn't have its 3 nails labelled up as E, C and B

Then you would have to be very careful to fit it into your shoe the right way round. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

Hello,

it is a wick 'cleaner' skeets,

Markbaby added an answer + a link in post # 08.

Not only that they are Aladdin wick cleaners.

Aladdin also sold paraffin in the days when paraffin was coloured.

Everyone remembers that ESSO paraffin was blue (ESSO BLUE) and that there was also a PINK PARAFFIN, but I can't remember what colour, if any, Aladdin used.

I think there was a make called "Crystal" which was clear.

All paraffin sold today has to be clear (uncoloured) under an EU regulation as it is thought that colours make it attractive to children who make then drink it.

So that's something else that's gone these days.

Much less paraffin is used now than years ago and that which is used today isn't nicely coloured.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vox

I think there was also "Aladdin Pink" Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vox

Here we are

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vox

Here we are

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

Here we are

I've got an old paraffin can just like that one in the garage somewhere.

I'll have to find it out and see what it says on the side of it.

We still use a fair bit of paraffin.

We have several hurricane lamps, a table lamp and 2 greenhouse heaters.

Last winter the greenhouse heaters were used a lot and got through about 10 gallons of paraffin.

Fortunately with MrsH working in a garden centre it's not that difficult to get hold of at a fairly reasonable price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vox

"The public were encouraged to associate celebrities such as Malcolm Campbell, Major Seagrave and Colonel Eyston with BP petrol. The company, did not market petrol alone, but also a range of oil derived products (not nearly as extensive as those produced today). The best remembered is Aladdin Pink, known after the war as Pink Paraffin. The pink dye was added as a safety feature in order to prevent paraffin being mistaken for other liquids. An uncoloured form was sold (much more cheaply) as ‘White May’."

Source

A History of BP Advertising

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vox

The Esso Blue advert was a cartoon. The character was called 'The Esso Blee Dooler'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

It seems my mention of the different types and colours of parafin has opened up a whole new area of "things now gone" ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hilldweller

What a brilliant prank that was HD. ;-)

Passing off a 3 stud seg marked SEG1 as an equivalent semiconductor to an OC71

It's the sort of trick me and Stuart would have thought in our youger days

What a pity that SEG1 doesn't have its 3 nails labelled up as E, C and B

Then you would have to be very careful to fit it into your shoe the right way round. lol

I pre-date the invention of the junction transistor by a few months and most of my childhood electronics dabbling was carried out using thermionic valves. These generally operated from power supplies of two to three hundred volts DC and resulted in many shouts of "ouch" or worse.

The first Mullard transistor I ever saw was a double ended device with the base lead separate from the emitter and collector.

The Mullard OC71 (AF) and OC44 (RF) transistors were very expensive for a young lad, at about 44/6 each (£2.22). A man's wage at the time being only about £20 a week if he was lucky.

I used to buy "surplus" transistors of American origin from a little business on Granville Street.

These were unmarked apart from a dab of paint, green for RF and "red spot" for AF operation.

They were in flat metal packages with the collector lead spaced slightly apart. I think I paid about 3 shillings each for them.

In those days not even Bardwell sold transistors. He did however sell much WW2 government surplus equipment such as ex Navy R107 communications receivers and small search-lights which were a delight for a young lad.

I never had enough money to buy a R107 set but I did get a little R109 Army receiver which gave me hours of pleasure listening to radio hams.

Happy Days :)

HD

t

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest plain talker

Here we are

PInk?.... PINK?

we can't have PINK!

what about the song?

Bom-bom, Bom-bom, Esso blue!

(god! I remember the other adverts for esso blue...

the one where the little cartoon-man sang "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes!"

and the one where he did a pastiche of lord Kitchener, with a rhyme which ended

"... your heater, too, needs Blue!")

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Markbaby

PInk?.... PINK?

we can't have PINK!

what about the song?

Bom-bom, Bom-bom, Esso blue!

(god! I remember the other adverts for esso blue...

the one where the little cartoon-man sang "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes!"

and the one where he did a pastiche of lord Kitchener, with a rhyme which ended

"... your heater, too, needs Blue!")

"They asked me how I knew,

it was Esso blue,

I, of course replies

With lower grades one buys

Smoke gets in your eyes"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SteveHB

What was Carbide, and can you still buy it ?

I had at one time an old brass front light that fitted on my push-bike,

it was illuminated by carbide/gas.

Can remember the carbide as looked like bits of blue/green stone, and gave of a distinctive gas like smell,

the lamp had a water reservoir that dripped on the carbide to produce the flammable gas.

Where did Carbide come from, and did it have other uses .. ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest plain talker

"They asked me how I knew,

it was Esso blue,

I, of course replies

With lower grades one buys

Smoke gets in your eyes"

Hooo- rah! that was the one! lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

I pre-date the invention of the junction transistor by a few months and most of my childhood electronics dabbling was carried out using thermionic valves. These generally operated from power supplies of two to three hundred volts DC and resulted in many shouts of "ouch" or worse.

The first Mullard transistor I ever saw was a double ended device with the base lead separate from the emitter and collector.

The Mullard OC71 (AF) and OC44 (RF) transistors were very expensive for a young lad, at about 44/6 each (£2.22). A man's wage at the time being only about £20 a week if he was lucky.

I used to buy "surplus" transistors of American origin from a little business on Granville Street.

These were unmarked apart from a dab of paint, green for RF and "red spot" for AF operation.

They were in flat metal packages with the collector lead spaced slightly apart. I think I paid about 3 shillings each for them.

In those days not even Bardwell sold transistors. He did however sell much WW2 government surplus equipment such as ex Navy R107 communications receivers and small search-lights which were a delight for a young lad.

I never had enough money to buy a R107 set but I did get a little R109 Army receiver which gave me hours of pleasure listening to radio hams.

Happy Days :)

HD

t

A bit younger but a similar experience with electronics HD.

Started with valve and made the HAC (stands for Hear All Continents) 1 valve short wave receiver.

Valve projects were hard not because of the high voltages but because of the aluminium chassis and circular holes for the valve holders, so I quickly moved on to transistors which were ideal for just soldering onto a piece of Veroboard (the poor mans printed circuit board).

Almost all early transitor projects involved the OC71 or similar. the germanium type pnp junction transistor, but things were changing rapidly, first to the silicon based npn transistors, then to FEt's and other wierd types and then to IC's (Intergrated Circuits) and finally to the silicon chips we know and use today.

So another item for my suggestions of "things now gone is, -

Electronic devices that used thermionic radio valves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH

"They asked me how I knew,

it was Esso blue,

I, of course replies

With lower grades one buys

Smoke gets in your eyes"

Not exactly how I remember The Platters version of it from 1958

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57tK6aQS_H0?fs=1&amp;hl=en_GB"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57tK6aQS_H0?fs=1&amp;hl=en_GB" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...