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A Quite Difficult Question


RichardB
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Guest tsavo

First installment, answer 1: Mr W.H Haigh.

Wonder if this is the same Haigh who ran his last bus to Broomhill in 1890?

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First installment, answer 1: Mr W.H Haigh.

Wonder if this is the same Haigh who ran his last bus to Broomhill in 1890?

Eeeeek, good arrow lol

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Eeeeek, good arrow lol

Since you don't have access to the materials, I may have asked you a question that can't be answered from the internet, if so, I'm sorry, didn''t mean to head you off to find an unfindable answer. My original idea for this thread was to post stupid questions, real tough ones, but ones that COULD be answered given enough effort, a stubborn streak and basically, balls.

I think his one doesn't fit my own rules, and I offer my apologies.

However, since you're a man of much resolve and effort, I give you the mans initials, should you manage to trawl through dense directories and census returns, those initials are JS

The answer is also available, since my stinker of a question (and that's the spirit it was set in) wasn't even to my own rules - sorry.

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Guest tsavo

Since you don't have access to the materials, I may have asked you a question that can't be answered from the internet, if so, I'm sorry, didn''t mean to head you off to find an unfindable answer. My original idea for this thread was to post stupid questions, real tough ones, but ones that COULD be answered given enough effort, a stubborn streak and basically, balls.

I think his one doesn't fit my own rules, and I offer my apologies.

However, since you're a man of much resolve and effort, I give you the mans initials, should you manage to trawl through dense directories and census returns, those initials are JS

The answer is also available, since my stinker of a question (and that's the spirit it was set in) wasn't even to my own rules - sorry.

No apols needed, I'm enjoying the challenge. Thought I'd cracked it with an 1880 directory but when I (eventually) got to the right place it said, "here there is a toll bar". Nothing else and it made me wonder if, maybe, the keeper lived elsewhere. Will keep on looking and try and dream up a return question.

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Since you don't have access to the materials, I may have asked you a question that can't be answered from the internet, if so, I'm sorry, didn''t mean to head you off to find an unfindable answer. My original idea for this thread was to post stupid questions, real tough ones, but ones that COULD be answered given enough effort, a stubborn streak and basically, balls.

I think his one doesn't fit my own rules, and I offer my apologies.

However, since you're a man of much resolve and effort, I give you the mans initials, should you manage to trawl through dense directories and census returns, those initials are JS

The answer is also available, since my stinker of a question (and that's the spirit it was set in) wasn't even to my own rules - sorry.

Acording to picture sheffield the gate keeper was most probly James Percy .

http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/pi...ff.refno=s16163

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Acording to picture sheffield the gate keeper was most probly James Percy .

http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/pi...ff.refno=s16163

Well that's one to ponder, here's the answer from "Old Sheffield Town" by J Edward Vickers ....

Crowds of people had assembled at the bar as it reached midnight and the last person to pass through was Mr Haigh, a cab and coach proprietor, of Glossop Road. At 12 o'clock, to cheers from the crowd, John Speer, the toll collector, his occupation gone, simply locked the doors of his toll house and walked away. The crowd then lifted the gate off its hinges and threw it over a wall into a nearby field.

-------------------

My own conclusion on this is that James Percy, owned to building, and had bought the rights to collect tolls (paid a handsome sum), as per Syrup's PictureSheffield link, but it was John Speer who was the guy actually doing the work.

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Strange, but neither James Percy nor John Speer appear in the 1881 directory:

John Speer was hiding !!

Actually John Speer is traceable for at least 30 years previous to this time in Leeds.

1881 21 Bath Street, Leeds, John Speer, aged 47, house painter, wife Elizabeth 36

1871 26 Cross Bath Street, John 37, house painter, wife Elizabeth 26

1861 10 Morpeth, East Leeds, John 25, iron turner

John Speer married Elizabeth Brownfoot during the quarter April to Jun 1868, in Leeds; bet they didn't get 7 coffee perculators !!!!

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Guest tsavo

Another little puzzler for anyone who cares to think about it.

Why was Ebeneezer Hancock summoned by the Justice of the Peace in 1802

I've a feeling Richard knows this, but I live in hope that it teases him a little.......!

:P:P :P

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Another little puzzler for anyone who cares to think about it.

Why was Ebeneezer Hancock summoned by the Justice of the Peace in 1802

I've a feeling Richard knows this, but I live in hope that it teases him a little.......!

:P:P:P

You have me beaten with this one ... please tell lol

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Guest tsavo

You have me beaten with this one ... please tell lol

I never realised it, but Sheffield was also a centre for button making

In 1802 Ebenezer Hancock, described as a Sheffield roller, was summoned before the Justices at the Cutlers Hall, for an offence under a little used law. This law from, 1362, limited the use of expensive cloths, jewels or buttons amongst Yeomen and Handicrafts men. Giving evidence against him was John Barlow, a Sheffield Buttonmaker. The buttonmaker's of Sheffield successfully prosecuted Hancock for wearing 'twelve cloth covered buttons on his coat'. This law was apparently still on the statue books and Ebeneezer was fined a hefty 40 shillings for his trouble. I wonder what that would be in present day terms. Anyone hazard a guess?

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Well, I should have got that, well done lol

Indeed Sheffield had a button industry, somewhat overshadowed by Birmingham I believe. I was going to set a question relating to "Spatterdash", until I found they were a US/Canadian rock band and I got 60,000 hits, not the 3.2 hits I was expecting !!

So, as an additional question, wot's spatterdash all about please (in a Sheffield kind of way)

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Guest tsavo

That's a nice one. First thoughts is someone with the trots, trying to find which communal privie is unoccupied!

lollol lol

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Well, I should have got that, well done lol

Indeed Sheffield had a button industry, somewhat overshadowed by Birmingham I believe. I was going to set a question relating to "Spatterdash", until I found they were a US/Canadian rock band and I got 60,000 hits, not the 3.2 hits I was expecting !!

So, as an additional question, wot's spatterdash all about please (in a Sheffield kind of way)

Hi RichardB spatterdash

spat·ter·dash [ spáttər dàsh ] (plural spat·ter·dash·es)

knee-length covering: a knee-length cloth or leather legging formerly worn to protect clothing from water or mud spatters

Did Sheffield provide the Buttons ??

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Hi RichardB spatterdash

spat·ter·dash [ spáttər dàsh ] (plural spat·ter·dash·es)

knee-length covering: a knee-length cloth or leather legging formerly worn to protect clothing from water or mud spatters

Did Sheffield provide the Buttons ??

Apparently so, search this site for John Watts & Co, of Lambert Street, more info there if I remember correctly lol

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Guest tsavo

Who (a former Master Cutler) tried to get the streets of Sheffield paved with wood, instead of granite ? He also promoted Smoke abatement, but, that not nearly as interesting as wooden-paved streets :rolleyes:

Took a while, Richard, but the answer is Sir John Bingham of Walker & Hall fame. Apparently thrown from his horse when it slipped on the granite setts, landing him on his head. He seems to have unamused.

Talking about him, what was unusual procedure for customers to get into the Walker and Hall retail shops?

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It was Col Sir John Bingham (Mastle Cutler twice), Conservative member of the Town Council... nephew of Walker of Walker and Hall.

Tsavo, great answer, I like the way you waited three months since I posted the answer lol and, at the moment I don't know what special arrangements there were for getting in.

Well Done, on finding the answer Pal !!!

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Guest tsavo

Tsavo, great answer, I like the way you waited three months since I posted the answer lol and, at the moment I don't know what special arrangements there were for getting in.

Well Done, on finding the answer Pal !!!

Sorry, Richard, never saw the answer or your reply! It's been niggling me for a while but finally found the answer in Aspects of Sheffield (1) which Student Nurse brought over for me last week.

:rolleyes::rolleyes: :rolleyes:

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Talking about him, what was unusual procedure for customers to get into the Walker and Hall retail shops?

Well done on finding your own question, cuz I couldn't !!!

You had to be invited, recommended if you like, once accepted (an honour) you received a trade discount (50% I think)

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A bit random I know lol but I have a couple os ashtrays made by Walker & Hall inscribed'The Waldorf Hotel' evidently borrowed at sometime :blink: is there a Waldorf in England or would these have been loaned from the USA :huh:

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Do you remember, approximately, when you stole them ? or when you last visited the US ? lol

Hey!! Nothing to do with me, they were in the possession of my Great Aunt b 1896 then they passed to my Dad and now to me :( I have never fancied visiting the US :unsure:

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