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Guest catness

Hello everyone..

My name is Laurel. I live in Dixon Illinois 99 miles west of Chicago. Last night I was looking up Sheffield history and found this site. I've really enjoyed all the pictures and various other historical etcs.! Had a few laughs as well with the humorous banter going on. :rolleyes: Below I've copied what I have for my family thus far before coming to America. I have info. to share if interested. Thank you, Laurel p.s. I feel an addiction coming on!

Morgan County Biographies USA

CAMM, Samuel, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 34, P.O. Jacksonville; was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, Jan. 24, 1807; he was the son of William and Mary Camm; Samuel married in 1836, Miss Jane Minneack; until 1841 he was engaged in a coffee mill house; he then, accompanied by his family, emigrated to America, and settled near Winchester, Scott County, Ill.; in August, 1849, his wife died; while in Scott County, five daughters were born to them; second wife now living, formerly Miss Martha D. Butler, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Butler; oldest son, William, on the breaking out of the war, raised a company, and was elected captain of Co. K, 14th Regiment Illinois Infantry; Spring of 1861, for meritorious service he was promoted to Lieutenant colonel, serving in that capacity until the close of the war, in many hard_fought battles, as Shiloh and siege of Vicksburg; also enlisted in Hancock Corps as captain Co. H, 1st Regiment; Bernard, a brother, also enlisted in the 101st Illinois Regiment, and served four years a non_commissioned officer.

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Bayleaf

Hi Laurel, welcome to the Forum, glad you like it. That's quite a history you have there! Thanks for sharing it with us. We look forward to more from you when you have the time, on your family or anything else you have a mind to contribute. We also thrive on questions, so if there's anything we might be able help with, just let us know.It would be great if someone can pick up on your family history. Fingers crossed!

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vox

Hello everyone..

My name is Laurel. I live in Dixon Illinois 99 miles west of Chicago. Last night I was looking up Sheffield history and found this site. I've really enjoyed all the pictures and various other historical etcs.! Had a few laughs as well with the humorous banter going on. :rolleyes: Below I've copied what I have for my family thus far before coming to America. I have info. to share if interested. Thank you, Laurel p.s. I feel an addiction coming on!

Morgan County Biographies USA

CAMM, Samuel, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 34, P.O. Jacksonville; was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, Jan. 24, 1807; he was the son of William and Mary Camm; Samuel married in 1836, Miss Jane Minneack; until 1841 he was engaged in a coffee mill house; he then, accompanied by his family, emigrated to America, and settled near Winchester, Scott County, Ill.; in August, 1849, his wife died; while in Scott County, five daughters were born to them; second wife now living, formerly Miss Martha D. Butler, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Butler; oldest son, William, on the breaking out of the war, raised a company, and was elected captain of Co. K, 14th Regiment Illinois Infantry; Spring of 1861, for meritorious service he was promoted to Lieutenant colonel, serving in that capacity until the close of the war, in many hard_fought battles, as Shiloh and siege of Vicksburg; also enlisted in Hancock Corps as captain Co. H, 1st Regiment; Bernard, a brother, also enlisted in the 101st Illinois Regiment, and served four years a non_commissioned officer.

Hello there

I had a quick look for the Camms on google this morning before I went to work. It seems like there's quite a lot there already, especially after them getting to America. I didn't have much time to look very deeply but I'm assuming it's the same people.

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RichardB

Welcome Catness and enjoy - looking forward to some new (old) information.

I've been here since ***** was a kitten and its doing my head in.

Regards

RichardB (stuck in the middle of a weeks work updating Sheffield Publicans in 1879).

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DaveH

Hello there

I had a quick look for the Camms on google this morning before I went to work. It seems like there's quite a lot there already, especially after them getting to America. I didn't have much time to look very deeply but I'm assuming it's the same people.

With the anniversary of the Battle of Britain upon us I wonder if catness is any relation to this famous Camm.

Sydney Camm

The man who designed the Hawker Hurricane.

Although the Spitfire has the reputation as the aircraft that saved Britain from the Luftwaffe in 1940, a large proportion of the aircraft used in that crucial battle were in fact Hurricanes.

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DaveH

Hello everyone..

My name is Laurel. I live in Dixon Illinois 99 miles west of Chicago. Last night I was looking up Sheffield history and found this site. I've really enjoyed all the pictures and various other historical etcs.! Had a few laughs as well with the humorous banter going on. :rolleyes: Below I've copied what I have for my family thus far before coming to America. I have info. to share if interested. Thank you, Laurel p.s. I feel an addiction coming on!

Morgan County Biographies USA

CAMM, Samuel, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 34, P.O. Jacksonville; was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, Jan. 24, 1807; he was the son of William and Mary Camm; Samuel married in 1836, Miss Jane Minneack; until 1841 he was engaged in a coffee mill house; he then, accompanied by his family, emigrated to America, and settled near Winchester, Scott County, Ill.; in August, 1849, his wife died; while in Scott County, five daughters were born to them; second wife now living, formerly Miss Martha D. Butler, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Butler; oldest son, William, on the breaking out of the war, raised a company, and was elected captain of Co. K, 14th Regiment Illinois Infantry; Spring of 1861, for meritorious service he was promoted to Lieutenant colonel, serving in that capacity until the close of the war, in many hard_fought battles, as Shiloh and siege of Vicksburg; also enlisted in Hancock Corps as captain Co. H, 1st Regiment; Bernard, a brother, also enlisted in the 101st Illinois Regiment, and served four years a non_commissioned officer.

Hi Laurel and welcome to Sheffield History, glad you are enjoying the site and in particular our humour.

As your ancestor was from the northern state of Illinois he would have been with the union troops. There is evidence that here in northern England, including Sheffield, that as Lancashire in particular which had the worlds largest cotton goods industry at the time which relied upon cotton imported from the southern states that there was active support in this part of Britain for those southern rebel boys of the Confederacy who wanted to keep their slaves on the plantations and were prepared to "cede from the union" to keep this right. Looks like we were on the wrong side. <_<

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RichardB

Hi Laurel and welcome to Sheffield History, glad you are enjoying the site and in particular our humour.

As your ancestor was from the northern state of Illinois he would have been with the union troops. There is evidence that here in northern England, including Sheffield, that as Lancashire in particular which had the worlds largest cotton goods industry at the time which relied upon cotton imported from the southern states that there was active support in this part of Britain for those southern rebel boys of the Confederacy who wanted to keep their slaves on the plantations and were prepared to "cede from the union" to keep this right. Looks like we were on the wrong side. <_<

Good job you are a Chemist, Dave.

That reply needs taking out and shooting ! Stick some punctuation in there ...

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Guest catness

Hi Laurel, welcome to the Forum, glad you like it. That's quite a history you have there! Thanks for sharing it with us. We look forward to more from you when you have the time, on your family or anything else you have a mind to contribute. We also thrive on questions, so if there's anything we might be able help with, just let us know.It would be great if someone can pick up on your family history. Fingers crossed!

Thanks for the warm welcome Bayleaf.. I'm pleased you all enjoy questions for I will thrive on asking them!

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Guest catness

Hello there

I had a quick look for the Camms on google this morning before I went to work. It seems like there's quite a lot there already, especially after them getting to America. I didn't have much time to look very deeply but I'm assuming it's the same people.

Nice to meet you Vox. Yes, most the info. I have is on my side of the pond. Alot of interesting civil war history for these Camm brothers. So I continue on with my Camms of Sheffield area pre 1841. I read about Samuel Camm and the beechcliff home. Looked it up and its currently a victorian rest home. I'm also curious about Camm Street, do you know origin of?

vox means good voice? something musical I believe. ty laurel

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Guest catness

Welcome Catness and enjoy - looking forward to some new (old) information.

I've been here since ***** was a kitten and its doing my head in.

Regards

RichardB (stuck in the middle of a weeks work updating Sheffield Publicans in 1879).

Thankx RichardB...you must be one of the more seasoned members! Ur interests sound interesting. Nice to meet you. laurel

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Guest catness

With the anniversary of the Battle of Britain upon us I wonder if catness is any relation to this famous Camm.

Sydney Camm

The man who designed the Hawker Hurricane.

Although the Spitfire has the reputation as the aircraft that saved Britain from the Luftwaffe in 1940, a large proportion of the aircraft used in that crucial battle were in fact Hurricanes.

Hi DaveH... I have no idea. Hope so! Impressive to say the least. Scanned the link briefly, will read more soonish. Thanks for the info. laurel

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Guest catness

Hi Laurel and welcome to Sheffield History, glad you are enjoying the site and in particular our humour.

As your ancestor was from the northern state of Illinois he would have been with the union troops. There is evidence that here in northern England, including Sheffield, that as Lancashire in particular which had the worlds largest cotton goods industry at the time which relied upon cotton imported from the southern states that there was active support in this part of Britain for those southern rebel boys of the Confederacy who wanted to keep their slaves on the plantations and were prepared to "cede from the union" to keep this right. Looks like we were on the wrong side. <_<

Very interesting DaveH! War between the states had great impact around the world trade wise..angle I havent thought of enough. I had kin on both sides. Here my many gr gr etc grandfather and uncle were fighting the rebs..when they had family back in their homeland which they prolly still communicated with needing export from their enemy. OK I'm ranting not making a bit of sense, need to go to bed!

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DaveH

Good job you are a Chemist, Dave.

That reply needs taking out and shooting ! Stick some punctuation in there ...

Come on Richard you know whats wrong with my post here,-

Early evening after tea

School holidays, no pressure or extra work

Quantity of alcohol been consumed with tea

Quantity of alcohol being consumed while posting

..and another one

As long as you get the point of the post.

Catness's family originate from the north of England and went to the northern states, so would have been union forces in the civil war

Due to International trade most people in northern England would have been supporting the southern states.

That could have potentially put the Camm family, on opposite sides of the Atlantic also in opposing forces in the war.

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DaveH

Very interesting DaveH! War between the states had great impact around the world trade wise..angle I havent thought of enough. I had kin on both sides. Here my many gr gr etc grandfather and uncle were fighting the rebs..when they had family back in their homeland which they prolly still communicated with needing export from their enemy. OK I'm ranting not making a bit of sense, need to go to bed!

Thanks catness,

At least you seemed to understand what I was saying a bit better than what Richard did. lol

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vox

Nice to meet you Vox. Yes, most the info. I have is on my side of the pond. Alot of interesting civil war history for these Camm brothers. So I continue on with my Camms of Sheffield area pre 1841. I read about Samuel Camm and the beechcliff home. Looked it up and its currently a victorian rest home. I'm also curious about Camm Street, do you know origin of?

vox means good voice? something musical I believe. ty laurel

Well the voice bit is right. I'll accept the good addition graciously.

Ta

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Guest catness

Thanks catness,

At least you seemed to understand what I was saying a bit better than what Richard did. lol

Upon reading my reply I realized I could have worded what was in my head more clearly..lol My yankee soldiers fighting the confederates ..who were supplying my yankees kinfolk in England. Enemy being the rebs to the yanks. Ugh! Thats no better. haha Well I'm sure you guys get what I'm saying. Warning: I might tend to say weird things in the middle of the night! |aure|

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DaveH

Upon reading my reply I realized I could have worded what was in my head more clearly..lol My yankee soldiers fighting the confederates ..who were supplying my yankees kinfolk in England. Enemy being the rebs to the yanks. Ugh! Thats no better. haha Well I'm sure you guys get what I'm saying. Warning: I might tend to say weird things in the middle of the night! |aure|

You got it catness.

But that it is why it was a CIVIL war.

It wasn't one country or one empire against another.

It was virtual neighbours, relatives and friends against each other.

and, like all wars, what a terrible, shameful waste of lives and resources it was. :(

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Guest catness

You got it catness.

But that it is why it was a CIVIL war.

It wasn't one country or one empire against another.

It was virtual neighbours, relatives and friends against each other.

and, like all wars, what a terrible, shameful waste of lives and resources it was. :(

On an entirely new spin.. Saw Michael Palin is a Sheffieldian. Hope I'm correct in my reading. Grew up to Monty Python. :P

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DaveH

On an entirely new spin.. Saw Michael Palin is a Sheffieldian. Hope I'm correct in my reading. Grew up to Monty Python. :P

Michael Palin is a well known Sheffielder (Sheffieldian!!!).

I am sure there is a named brass plate for him in the walk of fame on the pavement outside the town hall.

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