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Sheffield History

THE BUCCANEER - Leopold Street, Sheffield

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good memories of the Bucc good music ,youngers tartan bitter ,Newcastle brown ,guiness,great atmosphere great times with my brother john sad day when it closed, if it hadn't closed I think I would still be going

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I remember the dancer he was called Mighty Melvin

And I believe previously worked in Sammy Osbourne's rolling mills.

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This was my pub of choice in town and I started drinking there in 1970/71. If we were there early enough we went for the seats below the window to the street level on your immediate left as you went downstairs. You had the advantage of seeing everything that went on in the bar and admiring the view as mini skirted girls walked past on Leopold Street. It was dimly lit and I remember that being an attraction. If it had been well lit I guess it would have looked far worse than it was as a lot of beer finished up on the floor most nights! It was so dark that if you popped over to the Stonehouse for a late drink you needed shades as it seemed so bright in comparison. The toilets were a dump and very small?

I remember paying 1/6d (7.5pence would you believe) for a pint of double diamond. I don't remember them having draught lager at that time and I still hadn't aquired the taste for bitter. I seem to remember the music was better and louder than most pubs which they probably got away with being below street level. This also had the disadvantage of it being very smoky. We all seemed to smoke back then and if you didn't you probably breathed in a pack of 20 a night of other peoples smoke! You sometimes use to see the the odd group of Sheffield Wednesday players there and I seem to remember Wilf Smith, David Ford being there a couple of times.

There was a lot of protest when plastic glasses were introduced and things didn't seem the same after that. I haven't lived in Sheffield since 1982 but was there to see it close which was a sad day. I only ever went to the place that replaced it once. Featureless I remember.

ps. evidently it closed in 1973 but I thought it was a lot later than that.

I remember well the introduction of plastic glasses, my mates and I walked out and never went in again. It was a great place before that however, plenty of gorgeous young lasses.

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We used to call it "The Beakers" because of the plastic glasses.It closed before I was 18 so I never did drink in there legally.We used to sneak in,sometimes got funny looks,but I can't remember ever being turned away.There was a barmaid called Lorraine who used to serve me even if I was miles away from the bar,then she'd give me a wink.Hehe.Best pub ever.

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When it was announced that it was to close loads of people arranged descend on the Bucc to have one final wild time. The date was getting close and anticipation high.

Me and a few mates decided to go there a few days before the closure date only for it to be announced it was to close that night probably due to worries regarding the number of people who may try to get in on the closure date.

At the end of the night we said our goodbyes and helped ourselves to a keepsake or two like ashtrays, beermats or posters.

Wondered around a while then went for the whistle bus home but as we came up the escalator onto High Street about 6 policemen brushed past me and arrested 3 of my mates for theft (they weren't trying to conceal anything).

They were release with a caution at West Bar.

Real shame we used to love going there even though it could take an age to get a drink.

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This was my pub of choice in town and I started drinking there in 1970/71. If we were there early enough we went for the seats below the window to the street level on your immediate left as you went downstairs. You had the advantage of seeing everything that went on in the bar and admiring the view as mini skirted girls walked past on Leopold Street.

You possibly saw me fall over the row of beer barrels waiting for the drayman!

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Spent part of my STAG night in there in October 68. Don't remember much about it except some clown trying to get us to go to the Barley Corn next, - now that was a pub ?????

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My one memory of the Buck was my stag night. One of our stops on our pub crawl.

How I made the stairs I have no idea. Luckily we did this on the thursday so we made the church on the saturday ok.   

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On 14/02/2007 at 16:31, Sheffield History said:

also a piece about Vietnam, but right now I cannot remember the singer – lyrics were:

"And its one. Two, three, what are we fighting for? Don’t ask me I don’t give a damn,Next stop is Vietnam

This is a song by Arlo Guthrie, son of Woody Guthrie.  I have it on an album, (I think the album is Alice's Restaurant), which I bought in Wilson Peck music store, in about 1975 or 76 - just a few yards from where The Buccaneer had been.  I don't remember the name of that particular song.

I was far too young to ever go in The Buccaneer, but I do remember a huge pirate outside the Leopold Street door, which isn't in the photo at the top of the thread.  Does anyone else remember this?  I think it was sitting down in a huge chair, and it may have had a hook for a hand.  Was it made of plastic, wood, plaster?  It was certainly there in the last two or three years before they demolished The Grand Hotel.

I spent 1979 to 1984 working on the 7th floor of the Fountain Precinct, so the Pig & Whistle, (later the Fountain Bar), which occupied the physical space of The Buccaneer, became a regular after-work drinking hole, and Josephine's felt like it was "our" sports & social club.

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On 22/07/2013 at 23:50, thejoker53 said:

I remember the dancer he was called Mighty Melvin

 

He was indeed. He also went by the title of the Mighty Atom iirc - at least I herd him called that. He also used to perform at a bar/pub at the junction of Staniforth Road and Attercliffe road, near the old Banners store because we saw him there. I did have a girlfriend who knew him to talk to and he was a nice guy, and couldn't half dance too. 

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On 13/01/2019 at 18:26, Craigio said:

This is a song by Arlo Guthrie, son of Woody Guthrie.  I have it on an album, (I think the album is Alice's Restaurant), which I bought in Wilson Peck music store, in about 1975 or 76 - just a few yards from where The Buccaneer had been.  I don't remember the name of that particular song.

I was far too young to ever go in The Buccaneer, but I do remember a huge pirate outside the Leopold Street door, which isn't in the photo at the top of the thread.  Does anyone else remember this?  I think it was sitting down in a huge chair, and it may have had a hook for a hand.  Was it made of plastic, wood, plaster?  It was certainly there in the last two or three years before they demolished The Grand Hotel.

I spent 1979 to 1984 working on the 7th floor of the Fountain Precinct, so the Pig & Whistle, (later the Fountain Bar), which occupied the physical space of The Buccaneer, became a regular after-work drinking hole, and Josephine's felt like it was "our" sports & social club.

I feel like i'm fixin to die, --probably were if you were in the queue for the bar.

https://www.songfacts.com/facts/country-joe-the-fish/i-feel-like-im-fixin-to-die-rag

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