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Head Like A Beetroot


RichardB
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Been hours in the garden (wearing a silly hat most of the time), I've caught the sun though and look like a beetroot. Applied some aftersun, now I look like a beetroot thats covered in dripping.

"You'll never dig that out" was said at some point ... needless to say it's out but I will regret it for days to come.

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Been hours in the garden (wearing a silly hat most of the time), I've caught the sun though and look like a beetroot. Applied some aftersun, now I look like a beetroot thats covered in dripping.

"You'll never dig that out" was said at some point ... needless to say it's out but I will regret it for days to come.

Sounds like you have removed a tree stump?

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Sounds like you have removed a tree stump?

Either that or the return of a strange 30-foot "Giant Hogweed"-remnant (song reference ?)

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Either that or the return of a strange 30-foot "Giant Hogweed"-remnant (song reference ?)

A quick google came up with ..

The Return Of The Giant Hogweed by Genesis.

Never heard of that one before

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A quick google came up with ..

The Return Of The Giant Hogweed by Genesis.

Never heard of that one before

Full points to you; great album from when Peter Gabriel used to go on stage dressed as a bunch of grapes... well found.

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His and Hers Gardening Essentials (in order of importance)

Hers

Gloves

Secateurs

Comfy Seat

Seeds

Umbrella

His

Radio

Axe

Bowsaw

Hammer

Spade

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Either that or the return of a strange 30-foot "Giant Hogweed"-remnant (song reference ?)

Giant hogweed came to prominence in the early 1970's as when you cut it down you can have a very serious allergic reaction to its sap, which causes "burns" and blisters on the skin and another allergic reaction to its pollen which is thought to be one of the causes of the massive increases in hayfever sufferes over the last 40 years, - although I think, as a hayfever sufferer, the farming of rapeseed has a lot to do with it.

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I have a big problem with Devils Gut's at the moment,

no known cure, I'm afraid .. :(

Cure for Devils Gut

Cut down on your alcohol consumption lol

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His and Hers Gardening Essentials (in order of importance)

Hers

Gloves

Secateurs

Comfy Seat

Seeds

Umbrella

His

Radio

Axe

Bowsaw

Hammer

Spade

My wife is an excellent and well qualified gardener so I'm saying nowt! :rolleyes:

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Been hours in the garden (wearing a silly hat most of the time), I've caught the sun though and look like a beetroot. Applied some aftersun, now I look like a beetroot thats covered in dripping.

"You'll never dig that out" was said at some point ... needless to say it's out but I will regret it for days to come.

Here you are Richard, don't be to unhappy

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Full points to you; great album from when Peter Gabriel used to go on stage dressed as a bunch of grapes... well found.

Cant find the bunch of grapes but i found Peter Gabriel in his Flower outfit.

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I doubt if that will get shut of Hell Weed.

:(

So isn't Devil's Gut an upset stomach? :unsure:

Usually brought on by excessive eating or drinking of the wrong sort of stuff, - like alcoholic drinks in excess. lol

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So isn't Devil's Gut an upset stomach? :unsure:

Usually brought on by excessive eating or drinking of the wrong sort of stuff, - like alcoholic drinks in excess. lol

No Dave,

here are some offending roots,

and I have renamed it the Pot Noodle Weed.

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No Dave,

here are some offending roots,

and I have renamed it the Pot Noodle Weed.

Looks nasty, and by "no known cure" I take it you mean it's difficult to get rid of.

While on holiday this week we have managed to get down to the wifes allotment which has very quickly become over run with weeds and unwanted tall growing plants.

Although this dismayed her a bit we soon made short work of them with power tools. There is no electricity down on the allotments so petrol powered trimmers, strimmers and tillers tend to get used a lot (I wonder if the noise annoys the local residents?)

With only half a litre of petrol her overgrown third of an acre of land was soon cut down to size.

But, give it a couple of weeks and half of those weeds will be back again.

We can keep them in check and under control easily enough, but can we get rid of them for good?

I don't think so.

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Frazzled again; big wide-brimmed hat, thick long sleeved shirt, long trews; hid under a huge cast-iron based umbrella when I could - still burning up, hours later - thinking about spending the night in the freezer.

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Frazzled again; big wide-brimmed hat, thick long sleeved shirt, long trews; hid under a huge cast-iron based umbrella when I could - still burning up, hours later - thinking about spending the night in the freezer.

Well today its all rain and thunderstorms so that should help solve your "gardening in ridiculously hot, only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the mid day sun" problem for a while.

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Well today its all rain and thunderstorms so that should help solve your "gardening in ridiculously hot, only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the mid day sun" problem for a while.

Nice day here in the frozen North; warm, dry - very pleasant and not uncomfortable to work in.

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Nice day here in the frozen North; warm, dry - very pleasant and not uncomfortable to work in.

Just stopped raining here and it is brightening up a bit, but I rxpect there will be further showers.

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Giant hogweed came to prominence in the early 1970's as when you cut it down you can have a very serious allergic reaction to its sap, which causes "burns" and blisters on the skin and another allergic reaction to its pollen which is thought to be one of the causes of the MASSIVE increases in hayfever sufferes over the last 40 years, - although I think, as a hayfever sufferer, the farming of rapeseed has a lot to do with it.

Totally agree - from one Hayfever sufferer to another. I never had Hayfever until I was 18 and the Doctor said not to worry as I would grow out of it - still waiting :(

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Totally agree - from one Hayfever sufferer to another. I never had Hayfever until I was 18 and the Doctor said not to worry as I would grow out of it - still waiting :(

Never had it until I was 14 in 1970.

Strange really because at this time hogweed was a particular problem and rapeseed was just starting to be grown around here so I don't actually know what it is I am allergic too.

I am probably allergic to grass pollen (and there was plenty of that about before I was 14) because my hayfever starts around May or June depending on the weather, peaks in the second half of June and first half of July and then stops abruptly around mid July. This seems to correspond to the grass pollen season.

Throughout the 1970's it was a real pain. None of the drugs at that time worked(over the counter ones, I never went to the doctors with it). I took all my exams, CSE, O-level, A-level and degree suffering from it as all exams then were at this time of year.

It wasn't until the late 1980's that I found a set of tablets called "Haymine" which actually worked. That was great, I could go out in the summer again and I even started going to steam rallies, held in fields, at the height of the pollen season.

However, some time around 2002 the "Haymine" tablets were withdrawn because they contained an amine called ephidrine which was on some sort of banned list for some reason. It was also alledged that they could make you drowsy and that it would prevent you doing certain things like driving but they never affected me that way.

The other antihistamines still available, like Piriton, didn't work.

All Hayfever tablets now seem to contain one of two ingredients, the main one being Citerizine Hydrochloride. Fortunately this does work, not as well as Haymine used to, but it does work.

More recently (this year in fact) I have found that I am on that many prescription medicines, permenantly for other problems that I have bought an NHS prescription prepayment card which gets you ALL your prescriptions at a fixed monthly price regardless. If you need 2 or more prescription items per month it works out a lot cheaper.

So, for the first time ever this year I have had to admit to my doctor that I have been suffering from Hayfever for 40 years and can I have a prescription for the tablets for it because the prescription is now cheaper than buying them over the counter.

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Never had it until I was 14 in 1970.

Strange really because at this time hogweed was a particular problem and rapeseed was just starting to be grown around here so I don't actually know what it is I am allergic too.

I am probably allergic to grass pollen (and there was plenty of that about before I was 14) because my hayfever starts around May or June depending on the weather, peaks in the second half of June and first half of July and then stops abruptly around mid July. This seems to correspond to the grass pollen season.

Throughout the 1970's it was a real pain. None of the drugs at that time worked(over the counter ones, I never went to the doctors with it). I took all my exams, CSE, O-level, A-level and degree suffering from it as all exams then were at this time of year.

It wasn't until the late 1980's that I found a set of tablets called "Haymine" which actually worked. That was great, I could go out in the summer again and I even started going to steam rallies, held in fields, at the height of the pollen season.

However, some time around 2002 the "Haymine" tablets were withdrawn because they contained an amine called ephidrine which was on some sort of banned list for some reason. It was also alledged that they could make you drowsy and that it would prevent you doing certain things like driving but they never affected me that way.

The other antihistamines still available, like Piriton, didn't work.

All Hayfever tablets now seem to contain one of two ingredients, the main one being Citerizine Hydrochloride. Fortunately this does work, not as well as Haymine used to, but it does work.

More recently (this year in fact) I have found that I am on that many prescription medicines, permenantly for other problems that I have bought an NHS prescription prepayment card which gets you ALL your prescriptions at a fixed monthly price regardless. If you need 2 or more prescription items per month it works out a lot cheaper.

So, for the first time ever this year I have had to admit to my doctor that I have been suffering from Hayfever for 40 years and can I have a prescription for the tablets for it because the prescription is now cheaper than buying them over the counter.

Many years ago I used to have a series of 3 injections before the hayfever season started which had to be put in a muscle at the top of the leg - not pleasant, but seemed to work to a degree. Only problem was you could only have them for a few years because after that the muscles start to degenerate!! I now have a nasal spray, drops for my eyes and Benadryl tablets, but still get symptoms - cant seem to find anything that clears it fully :( Tesco has Benadryl at the moment for a BOGOF. Piriton dont work for me either.

The prepayment card is worth it for me because I have asthma inhalers too and apparently hayfever and asthma go hand-in-hand.

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Many years ago I used to have a series of 3 injections before the hayfever season started which had to be put in a muscle at the top of the leg - not pleasant, but seemed to work to a degree. Only problem was you could only have them for a few years because after that the muscles start to degenerate!! I now have a nasal spray, drops for my eyes and Benadryl tablets, but still get symptoms - cant seem to find anything that clears it fully :( Tesco has Benadryl at the moment for a BOGOF. Piriton dont work for me either.

The prepayment card is worth it for me because I have asthma inhalers too and apparently hayfever and asthma go hand-in-hand.

Piriton do have their use.

To go back to the theme of this thread, gardening, my wife is a keen gardener and has her own allotment.

Unfortunately gardeners frequently get insect bites, many of which my wife is allergic to and bring her out in a nasty red rash around the bite which can rapidly spread.

Fortunately a couple of doses of Piriton usually clears it up quickly with no lasting effects.

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Piriton do have their use.

To go back to the theme of this thread, gardening, my wife is a keen gardener and has her own allotment.

Unfortunately gardeners frequently get insect bites, many of which my wife is allergic to and bring her out in a nasty red rash around the bite which can rapidly spread.

Fortunately a couple of doses of Piriton usually clears it up quickly with no lasting effects.

Yep agree - just no good for hayfever.

At the moment we are fighting a losing battle against weeds in our garden and they are the only thing that seem to be flourishing.

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