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DaveH

Furnival Gate Underpass

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DaveH

Went to town the other day and noticed that they were doing excavation work on either side of Furnival Gate where the old underpass used to be.

The excavations had revealed some of the old underpass which could be seen through the safety fencing from the street.

This used to be quite a busy underpass and had a set of public toilets under the middle of Furnival Gate.

Since its closure crossing Furnival Gate has been a bit risky,

Some pedestrians are impatient and don't wait for the green man and cross on the red man (that's like driving a car through a red light)

Some car drivers coming down Furnival Gate ignore the directions forcing them to turn up Pinstone Street and go straight down anyway, causing them to have to drive through a red light while there is a green man on the pedestrian crossing.

Certainly crossing the road here is more risky than being mugged by a gang of yobs in a busy underpass.

I don't know why they are doing this excavation work but I supose it's too much to ask and too much like wishful thinking on my part, BUT...

Will they be working to reopen the underpass?

In the unlikely event that the answer is YES, then what about us having the hole in the road back as well. lol

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Guest suzy

Went to town the other day and noticed that they were doing excavation work on either side of Furnival Gate where the old underpass used to be.

The excavations had revealed some of the old underpass which could be seen through the safety fencing from the street.

This used to be quite a busy underpass and had a set of public toilets under the middle of Furnival Gate.

Since its closure crossing Furnival Gate has been a bit risky,

Some pedestrians are impatient and don't wait for the green man and cross on the red man (that's like driving a car through a red light)

Some car drivers coming down Furnival Gate ignore the directions forcing them to turn up Pinstone Street and go straight down anyway, causing them to have to drive through a red light while there is a green man on the pedestrian crossing.

Certainly crossing the road here is more risky than being mugged by a gang of yobs in a busy underpass.

I don't know why they are doing this excavation work but I supose it's too much to ask and too much like wishful thinking on my part, BUT...

Will they be working to reopen the underpass?

In the unlikely event that the answer is YES, then what about us having the hole in the road back as well. lol

Very interesting B)

Wonder what they will find under there : fish still swimming happily in the fish tank he he

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DaveH

Very interesting B)

Wonder what they will find under there : fish still swimming happily in the fish tank he he

No that was the hole in the road as you well know. ;-)

All the Furnival Gate underpass had was the public toilets with "wash and brush up" facilities, - don't suppose they will find the attendant still on duty. lol

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Guest suzy

No that was the hole in the road as you well know. ;-)

All the Furnival Gate underpass had was the public toilets with "wash and brush up" facilities, - don't suppose they will find the attendant still on duty. lol

Glad to see you are on the ball today Dave lol

I reckon the toilet attendant may still be there , waiting for the next customer to arrive

UGH!!! Just think what else may be unearthed down there : on 2nd thoughts dont go there - I have not had my tea yet lol

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Bayleaf

Are we talking about 2 different places here? As I remember it, the toilets/wash and brush-up were in the subway at Moorhead, while the underpass was in the roundabout at the junction of Arundel gate and Furnival Gate, so you walked down into the central area then over a footbridge over the traffic on Arundel gate. I don't remember any toilets etc there, but I may be wrong (and frequently am according to 'er indoors!)

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DaveH

Are we talking about 2 different places here? As I remember it, the toilets/wash and brush-up were in the subway at Moorhead, while the underpass was in the roundabout at the junction of Arundel gate and Furnival Gate, so you walked down into the central area then over a footbridge over the traffic on Arundel gate. I don't remember any toilets etc there, but I may be wrong (and frequently am according to 'er indoors!)

What's the difference between an underpass and a subway?

The one in my pictures are at Moorhead and it went under (underpassed) Furnival Gate.

If calling it the Furnival Gate subway makes it any clearer, or even the moorhead subway.

The one at the Furnival Gate / Arundel Gate didn't underpass Furnival gate that much as Arundel Gate was at the lowest level.

Sorry about the confusion there Bayleaf. ;-)

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Stuart0742

What's the difference between an underpass and a subway?

The one in my pictures are at Moorhead and it went under (underpassed) Furnival Gate.

If calling it the Furnival Gate subway makes it any clearer, or even the moorhead subway.

The one at the Furnival Gate / Arundel Gate didn't underpass Furnival gate that much as Arundel Gate was at the lowest level.

Sorry about the confusion there Bayleaf. ;-)

I would agree with Bayleaf, :) I thought from the title you were talking about the underpass as Bayleaf describes, then I realised from your photo you were talking about the Moorhead subway.

Pedestrian subways and Road underpasses, both in the same area

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DaveH

I would agree with Bayleaf, :) I thought from the title you were talking about the underpass as Bayleaf describes, then I realised from your photo you were talking about the Moorhead subway.

Pedestrian subways and Road underpasses, both in the same area

OK, so subway is pedestrian and underpass is for vehicles.

Now if you had Man Wright for English, -

Sub = a prefix meaning under, below or beneath

Way = a route, path or passage (as in "right of way")

So, literally translated Subway = Underpass.

They mean the same thing!

You'll be trying to tell me next that a "Refuse Disposal Officer" isn't the same thing as a bin man :unsure:

Or that "BOGOF"and "2 for the price of 1" are different offers :blink:

Anyway, I'm not bothered what you want to call it, I'd just like to see it re-opened, - and the other one as well come to that.

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Guest suzy

OK, so subway is pedestrian and underpass is for vehicles.

Now if you had Man Wright for English, -

Sub = a prefix meaning under, below or beneath

Way = a route, path or passage (as in "right of way")

So, literally translated Subway = Underpass.

They mean the same thing!

You'll be trying to tell me next that a "Refuse Disposal Officer" isn't the same thing as a bin man :unsure:

Or that "BOGOF"and "2 for the price of 1" are different offers :blink:

Anyway, I'm not bothered what you want to call it, I'd just like to see it re-opened, - and the other one as well come to that.

Lets have the lot re-opened, underpasses, subways, etc, etc - there could be all sorts down there ........... and Dave, I get the feeling you just want to go underground regardless lol

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Bayleaf

OK, so subway is pedestrian and underpass is for vehicles.

Now if you had Man Wright for English, -

Sub = a prefix meaning under, below or beneath

Way = a route, path or passage (as in "right of way")

So, literally translated Subway = Underpass.

They mean the same thing!

You'll be trying to tell me next that a "Refuse Disposal Officer" isn't the same thing as a bin man :unsure:

Or that "BOGOF"and "2 for the price of 1" are different offers :blink:

Anyway, I'm not bothered what you want to call it, I'd just like to see it re-opened, - and the other one as well come to that.

Sorry Dave, just living up to my signature ;-)

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vox

Sorry Dave, just living up to my signature ;-)

I think "subway" is just another "Americanism" which we now have to accept. :(

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DaveH

Sorry Dave, just living up to my signature ;-)

No problem Bayleaf.

But this signature of yours, the "Yonder Peasant" thing, looks like a bit of Shakespeare to me.

I'm lost, it's not my strong point.

I may have had Man Wright (a brilliant teacher) for English at school but even he would be hard pushed to get any interest in it from a rough bunch of Arbourthorne lads. lol

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DaveH

I think "subway" is just another "Americanism" which we now have to accept. :(

Well in 1965 Bob Dylan (an American) came out with "Subterrainian Homesick Blues" on his album "Bringing it all back home"

But in 1967 it was Petula Clark (an English Francophile) who sang "Don't Sleep In The Subway" which was written by Tony Hatch and Jackie Trent (both English)

Now a song called "Don't Sleep In The Underpass" just doesn't sound right does it? It certainly wouldn't have been such a big hit for Pet Clark lol

..and to answer suzy, although this is not really my era,

I'm not thinking of "Going Underground" but in 1980 The Jam were, song written by Paul weller (English) I believe.

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Bayleaf

No problem Bayleaf.

But this signature of yours, the "Yonder Peasant" thing, looks like a bit of Shakespeare to me.

I'm lost, it's not my strong point.

I may have had Man Wright (a brilliant teacher) for English at school but even he would be hard pushed to get any interest in it from a rough bunch of Arbourthorne lads. lol

With apologies to Good King Wenceslas? ;-)

Isn't what the Americans call the Subway what we call the Underground?

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DaveH

With apologies to Good King Wenceslas? ;-)

Isn't what the Americans call the Subway what we call the Underground?

So your signature isn't Shakespeare, it's a line from a Christmas carol <_<

Previously we have sort of implied that subway was pedestrian and that underpass was for road vehicles

(although I would be tempted to call a road underpass a "tunnel") lol

This new American revelation now seems to be saying that a subway is a railway underpass if it is like our Underground.

Then again, I would call a railway underpass / subway a "tunnel" as well

Unless it was the London Underground in which case it could be the "tube" :huh:

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madannie77

So your signature isn't Shakespeare, it's a line from a Christmas carol <_<

Previously we have sort of implied that subway was pedestrian and that underpass was for road vehicles

(although I would be tempted to call a road underpass a "tunnel") lol

This new American revelation now seems to be saying that a subway is a railway underpass if it is like our Underground.

Then again, I would call a railway underpass / subway a "tunnel" as well

Unless it was the London Underground in which case it could be the "tube" :huh:

[digression]

Except that technically the term "Tube" applies only to the deep underground lines in London, built by proper tunnelling (Central, Bakerloo, Victoria, Piccadilly, Waterloo & City, Jubilee and Northern lines): the lines built by cut and cover methods (Metropolitan, District, Circle and Hammersmith & City lines) are technically the sub-surface lines. It is just laziness on the part of the travelling public to refer to all London Underground lines as "Tube", and this has become the name generally used by the authorities as well.

In addition to which, in many parts of the world, underground railways are known as Metro. :o

[/digression]

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DaveH

[digression]

Except that technically the term "Tube" applies only to the deep underground lines in London, built by proper tunnelling (Central, Bakerloo, Victoria, Piccadilly, Waterloo & City, Jubilee and Northern lines): the lines built by cut and cover methods (Metropolitan, District, Circle and Hammersmith & City lines) are technically the sub-surface lines. It is just laziness on the part of the travelling public to refer to all London Underground lines as "Tube", and this has become the name generally used by the authorities as well.

In addition to which, in many parts of the world, underground railways are known as Metro. :o

[/digression]

Why would anyone want to name an underground railway system after a roaring lion at the start of a film? lol

As one of our London Underground is called the Metropolitan (whatever that means) isn't "Metro" just a shortened form of this? :unsure:

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madannie77

Why would anyone want to name an underground railway system after a roaring lion at the start of a film? lol

As one of our London Underground is called the Metropolitan (whatever that means) isn't "Metro" just a shortened form of this? :unsure:

Can't think of an underground railway known as the Mayer or the Goldwyn :blink:

I think it is indeed taken from the Metropolitan Railway, but in a slightly roundabout way: the Paris underground was named the Metropolitane (after the London line), and this was soon shortened to Metro in common parlance.

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DaveH

Can't think of an underground railway known as the Mayer or the Goldwyn :blink:

I think it is indeed taken from the Metropolitan Railway, but in a slightly roundabout way: the Paris underground was named the Metropolitane (after the London line), and this was soon shortened to Metro in common parlance.

Just as we call the London Underground "The tube" Parisians tend to stick a Le (the) in front of their Metro, calling it "Le Metro" which then makes it imply that it is the entire network.

In a similar way "The Tube" implies the entire network even though, as you have pointed out in your digressionary post that in fact it isn't.

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madannie77

Just as we call the London Underground "The tube" Parisians tend to stick a Le (the) in front of their Metro, calling it "Le Metro" which then makes it imply that it is the entire network.

In a similar way "The Tube" implies the entire network even though, as you have pointed out in your digressionary post that in fact it isn't.

So is/was the Furnival Gate Underpass really a subway or a tunnel or a tube or a metro or a flyunder (if it is acceptable to have flyovers, why not flyunders) :o

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vox

(if it is acceptable to have flyovers, why not flyunders) :o

Because the opposite would be a "burrow-under" lol

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Guest suzy

..and to answer suzy, although this is not really my era,

I'm not thinking of "Going Underground" but in 1980 The Jam were, song written by Paul weller (English) I believe.

Good one Dave he he

Anyway - have you found out whats really happening? : is the gap big enough for you to crawl through, maybe push your lens down or at the very least send down a small child to have a look : legally and safely of course (not at all like sending them down chimneys in the Victorian era) lol

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DaveH

So is/was the Furnival Gate Underpass really a subway or a tunnel or a tube or a metro or a flyunder (if it is acceptable to have flyovers, why not flyunders) :o

Thanks madannie, - that seems to be the question that needs answering to sort out the confusion we have with the naming of our subterrainian walkways which which once plentiful in Sheffield in the 1970's and 80's.

I had hoped that this topic would generate interest in our lost subways / underpasses and whatever you want to call them when I started it.

Instead it seems to have become a discussion on what these underground walkways should actually have been called.

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Bayleaf

Thanks madannie, - that seems to be the question that needs answering to sort out the confusion we have with the naming of our subterrainian walkways which which once plentiful in Sheffield in the 1970's and 80's.

I had hoped that this topic would generate interest in our lost subways / underpasses and whatever you want to call them when I started it.

Instead it seems to have become a discussion on what these underground walkways should actually have been called.

Well, there was the one from Cole's Corner to Boots, including an entrance to Boots from the subway,underpass/tube thingy. Unfortunately it was short-lived as they made Fargate a pedestrian precinct not long after. I remember watching them fill it in by pumping huge amount of concrete into it.

Planning seems never to have been a strong point with the Council. They paid a fortune to bring Italian paviours over to lay the cobbles in Fargate, then when someone wanted to put tables out for a coffee shop they were told they couldn't, cos it would obstruct the passage of wheelchairs and prams, as the cobbles weren't suitable for anything with wheels. or for walking on. In a pedestrian precinct....

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DaveH

Well, there was the one from Cole's Corner to Boots, including an entrance to Boots from the subway,underpass/tube thingy. Unfortunately it was short-lived as they made Fargate a pedestrian precinct not long after. I remember watching them fill it in by pumping huge amount of concrete into it.

Planning seems never to have been a strong point with the Council. They paid a fortune to bring Italian paviours over to lay the cobbles in Fargate, then when someone wanted to put tables out for a coffee shop they were told they couldn't, cos it would obstruct the passage of wheelchairs and prams, as the cobbles weren't suitable for anything with wheels. or for walking on. In a pedestrian precinct....

Yes there was, - I used the one at Coles Corner to get into Boots at that lower floor (Basement) level because at one time that was where Boots had their home brewed beer section. lol

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