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Gentleman's Outfitters


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dunsbyowl1867

Anyone remember this from 1976 - I don't - my mum was still buying my clothes :( in those days.

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I got my (2nd) wedding suit from Barney's in 1983.

They had moved to 393, Eccleshall Road by then.

Still there 2010

Google Streetview

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"Tommy The Taylor" (Was he called Tommy Machin?) had a small shop on Commonside. Possibly where Rajput takeaway is now.

In the 1970's he was near the London Rd/Queens Road junction. Can't quite remember exactly which shop.

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ukelele lady

There were also a men's tailors at the corner of Church Street

and Leopold Street , in the 1980s.

Ted Williams, the two brothers ran it, does anyone remember it?

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madannie77

Can't see any mention of this one. As is typical the picture has a tram in it, and I only noticed the shop whilst determining the location :rolleyes:

Montague Russell: The Modern Tailor. Corner of Furnival Street and Porter Street. The photo was taken in 1957.

A similar shot showing more of Montague Russell's shop can be seen here

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ukelele lady

Does any of you gents out there remember this name?

Although I didn't know they did their own coathangers.

Didn't Harold Wilson help to make this name famous?

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SteveHB

Does any of you gents out there remember this name?

Although I didn't know they did their own coathangers.

Didn't Harold Wilson help to make this name famous?

My father had two Gannex overcoats, one in white and the other was khaki.

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Does any of you gents out there remember this name?

Although I didn't know they did their own coathangers.

Didn't Harold Wilson help to make this name famous?

When I saw the photo, and before I read your comment, I thought it was one of Harold Wilsons coat hangers.

Yes he did wear and promote Gannex raincoats and regularly wore one, but so do several other World statesmen and some members of the Royal family.

However, Wilson was from Huddersfield and was a well known Yorkshireman. He loved to promote local industry and as Gannex was made in Yorkshire, just down the road at Elland.........

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There were also a men's tailors at the corner of Church Street

and Leopold Street , in the 1980s.

Ted Williams, the two brothers ran it, does anyone remember it?

There is still a Ted Williams shop on London Road. It looks like a proper tailors.

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Sad news. Sheffield war hero Bob Bray, who carried out 94 missions for RAF Bomber Command during WWII and ran Gentlemans outfitters Bray Brothers died last week aged 93. RIP mate. A true hero.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11133885/Wing-Commander-Bob-Bray-obituary.html#disqus_thread

Hello and welcome Mark.

Thanks for your input, albeit a sad one to begin with.

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Guest Mark Hanson

Hello and welcome Mark.

Thanks for your input, albeit a sad one to begin with.

No problem. Saw the article and Googled Bray Bothers as I was brought up in Sheffield before I joined the RAF and this site came up. Thought it pertinent to post it.

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ManoutotCity
On 17/03/2010 at 08:41, dunsbyowl1867 said:

Barney Goodman Pinstone Street & S Paul's Parade. 1983 Advert

post-513-126881521779_thumb.jpg

I well recall, periodically, spending Saturday afternoons in  BGs sumptuous tailors shop, shown here. I was only a kid, 10 or so but even at that tender age couldn’t but be impressed at premises ...the spaciousness of the place - big soft leather couches, piles of expensive ‘coffee table magazines’ which probably cost a chunk out of an average working persons wage, though mainly directed at men in those days, so no ‘Hellos’ or ‘Beanos’ for long - suffering wives and kids waiting for husband or dad to be measured up, fitted, or whatever. Tea, Coffee provide in a civilised way - NO confounded, vending machines in those days! It was like a lounge in an expensive hotel and a definite experience for all who ventured in. The every present ‘Barney’ G, himself, who appeared constantly fixated with how his business was running and how his customers (he’d probably call them ‘clients’ these days) were being treated ...adorned  with tape measure permanently around his neck, an armoury of straight tailors pins in the lapels of his waistcoat, scissors, chalk etc whilst hovering  around his staff, watching their every move in measuring and fitting customers. BG wouldn’t hesitate to move in, ‘shoo’ his assistant aside and take over, if he’d didn’t like the way something was being done. He thought nothing of forcefully, ripping out, with some drama, a (fortunately, I suppose, ‘tacked’) sleeve which in his eyes ‘wasn’t right’. He made sure that no one left his premises with a bespoke garment bearing his  famous label, that wasn’t tip top!  
For people watchers - even intrigued, puzzled kids, the constant parade, in and out, of clientele, itself, held a fascination. Local celebrities, businessmen, motor traders, building workers etc - the common theme - they all had professions, businesses or simply, well-paid jobs which put BG Tailoring within their reach and a compelling desire to wear BG quality and style. I even recall the stacks of swatch books advertising the best  cloths in the business, like Reid and Taylor, Crombie - sometimes, in The World - Dormeuil ‘Tonic’ etc materials which you’d need to track to London’s West End, to see, let alone buy,  today.
Looking back  over half a century, through gradually, failing,eyes, I appreciate, just what a  true institution and a tremendous flag - flyer of what was good about Sheffield ,‘Barneys’ was. I often heard as once a long time Sheffield resident, how so much better the City was/is...indeed, much vaunted on this dedicated site.

But I would argue without fear of contradiction from others from that era, that Sheffield in those days was truly a great city. Oh yes, filthy and calloused from ‘it’s dirty, hard-working hands’, socially deprived in several areas - thankfully, successive improvements over the years have changed much of those shortcomings but I’m afraid, ‘out with the bath water, went the infant’.  
Those businesses  like BGs ....the OLD Austin Reads, Cockaynes, John Walsh, Stewart and Stewart, Mappin and Webb, Burrells clock and watch  makers/ retailers, etc, etc,etc......(not to mention Mr Winning’s breath-taking  beautifully laid and tended, nationally famous, public parks and gardens), went along with the welcome death of the privations, the muck, smogs, the industry and, in realty, the REAL wealth....I strongly suspect, never to return.

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