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Stuart0742

Lady's Bridge Question

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I noticed this today on the east side of Ladys Bridge

Where does this inflow come from, any thoughts

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I noticed this today on the east side of Ladys Bridge

Where does this inflow come from, any thoughts

Stuart

Is this the view from the other side of the bridge?

http://www.heritage-explorer.org.uk/web/he...ady&large=1

Could it be an overflow through the arch on the left above the weir? :unsure:

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Stuart

Is this the view from the other side of the bridge?

http://www.heritage-explorer.org.uk/web/he...ady&large=1

Could it be an overflow through the arch on the left above the weir? :unsure:

Thanks Dunsby, its just a matter of counting the arches then, more arches on the west side than the east lol

Why didn't I notice that <_<

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Thanks Dunsby, its just a matter of counting the arches then, more arches on the west side than the east lol

Why didn't I notice that <_<

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Stuart

Is this the view from the other side of the bridge?

http://www.heritage-explorer.org.uk/web/he...ady&large=1

Could it be an overflow through the arch on the left above the weir? :unsure:

I was hoping that was a secret tunnel ! :(

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Hello,

Just a piece of trivia.

If you look at the photo taken of the upstream side of the bridge, it shows sets of nicely painted railings over each arch. While crossing the bridge one day on my 2009 visit to Sheffield, I took particular notice of these handrails. As far as I can tell, at least one section is new, ie installed during the latest bridge reconstruction, possibly more. The old railings were likely to have been made of cast iron and this may have become a safety concern.

The present handrails closely resemble the ones installed in the 1900 widening scheme but soon after the blitz, one section of original handrail on the U/S side had the bars cut in a number of places so that that it left a series of square holes..... Four I think. These were for fire fighting as each was large enough to accomodate the basket on a fire brigade suction hose. To prevent kids like me falling through these openings, each one was fitted with a hinged steel flap. I think each flap was padlocked but I can't remember.

Looking at the photo, you would expect the holes to have been cut in the section at the extreme left, where water could be drawn from the deeper part of the river above the weir; however, I'm inclined to think they were at least one arch over- more towards the centre of the channel downstream of the weir.

The railings on the 'White Rails' section of Nursery Street also received the same cutting and flap treatment but these old railings seem to have been replaced new rails of a different design.

Regards

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Lady's Bridge used to have five arches on the west side.

http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/picturesheffield.pl?_cgifunction=form&_layout=picturesheffield&keyval=sheff.refno=s07500

The water above the weir was used to drive the wheels in the Wicker Tilt and the Wicker Wheel. Some time after 1900 the Tilt and the buildings in front of it were replaced by the Exchange Buildings and I imagine the stepped outfall was to divert the old head goits back into the river.

I believe ARCUS discovered some of the culverted head goit to the old Wicker Wheel during the construction of the new building on Blonk street.

Is the little arch on the extreme left still there ? This was added to the bridge in the 1750s I think, about the same time as the Wicker Tilt was built.

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Great find Gramps.

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I noticed this today on the east side of Ladys Bridge

Where does this inflow come from, any thoughts

This picture shows the view under that section of the bridge. I was told the bit in the middle was the original stone bridgework from the 15th century.

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